Archive for the ‘ASLA’ Category


Hopeful candidates pitch their projects and ideas to editors at the 2014 Meet the Editors in Denver.

The ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO can be a great way to catch up with current trends in the profession and those much-needed Professional Development Hours. But it can also be an opportunity to share with the Landscape Architecture Magazine team that much-beloved project you’ve been working on all year. Editors from LAM, The Dirt, and Topos will be on hand at the 2015 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO in Chicago, Saturday and Sunday, November 7–8, for Meet the Editors, a time block of 15-minute sign-up sessions with your choice of editor to pitch story ideas or that project you’ve worked so hard on.

New to Meet the Editors this year is Christopher McGee, Art Director for LAM, who will be available to provide feedback on photography portfolios. Spots are limited and fill quickly, so be sure to snag a session before they’re gone. While we love to hear about new products and advertisements, Meet the Editors is meant for practitioners and professionals only. However, if you’ve got that hot new product you’re sure landscape architects will love, be sure to contact our Goods columnist, Lisa Speckhardt, at lspeckhardt@asla.org.

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October’s LAM is our awards issue, and that means almost 70 pages of Student and Professional Award winners, including the 2015 Landmark Award given to Dan Kiley’s South Garden at the Art Institute of Chicago. Finished in 1962, the South Garden celebrates almost 50 years of continued excellence as both a landscape architecture project and a cherished space in the public realm.

Out of 327 submitted projects to the Student Awards, 23 winners were chosen, with many of the projects highlighting the diversifying nature of landscape architecture. In the Professional Awards, 33 winners were selected from 463 submissions, many of which set the tone for the future of the profession. All this plus our regular Land Matters and Now columns.

You can read the full table of contents for October 2015 or pick up a free digital issue of the October LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating October articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: Landmark Award, © Tom Harris/Courtesy the Cultural Landscape Foundation; Professional Communications Award of Excellence, Landscape Architecture Foundation; Professional Analysis and Planning Award of Excellence, Hargreaves Associates and Red Square; Professional Residential Design Award of Excellence, Hocker Design Group, Robert Yu, Justin Clemons; Professional General Design Award of Excellence, Courtesy Reed Hilderbrand.

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Suburban Street Stormwater Retrofitting: An Introduction to Improving Residential Rights-of-Way is the most recent addition to LATIS.

Suburban Street Stormwater Retrofitting: An Introduction to Improving Residential Rights-of-Way is the most recent addition to LATIS.

LATIS (Landscape Architecture Technical Information Series) is a great way to learn the technical intricacies of new research in the field, all while earning those much-needed professional development hours (PDHs). Each paper is peer reviewed to provide a learning experience that enriches the profession, with a test at the end that could earn up to 3.5 PDHs, depending on the paper.

New to the LATIS lineup is Suburban Street Stormwater Retrofitting: An Introduction to Improving Residential Rights-of-Way, by Andrew Fox, ASLA, and Jim Cooper, ASLA. At first glance it seems an odd choice in research, as most design professions have become so city focused. But Shawn Balon, ASLA, the professional practice manager at ASLA, says it’s an important topic to cover for landscape architects. “We often discuss green street design and low impact development within the urban context, but it is also important to begin thinking of how suburban interventions can create more aesthetic and healthier places for residents,” says Balon. To work toward a greener future, we must start to retrofit the present.

The paper takes a critical look at present suburban developments and their effects on hydrology, water quality, and community health, and explores existing retrofits, stormwater calculation estimations, design and construction details, cost estimation, and planting/maintenance options for suburban communities, Balon says.

LATIS papers are available to read free of charge for members, while nonmembers will pay $50. Exams for PDH credit are $40 for members and $60 for nonmembers. Click here for more information.

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This season marks the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, and the city of New Orleans finds there is still a long way to go to fully heal. But there are a lot of great revitalization stories, including those involving the beloved green spaces at the heart of the city, old and new. This three-minute video highlights four of these spaces, including the 2013 ASLA award-winning Lafitte Greenway by Design Workshop, which connects City Park to downtown, and Arnold Park, which plays host to Jazz in the Park, a free, weekly concert from September to October.

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Researchers will be paid an honorarium of $2500 if their work is accepted forthe LATIS series.  Credit: ASLA

Researchers will be paid an honorarium of $2,500 if their work is accepted for the LATIS series. Credit: ASLA.

Solid peer-reviewed research in new landscape practice areas is highly valuable and not always easy to find, and that’s why LATIS (Landscape Architecture Technical Information Series) is such a terrific resource.

LATIS papers provide practicing landscape architects with peer-reviewed technical information about new and evolving practices and products and offer an economical way to earn the professional development hours (PDH) needed to meet state licensure requirements. This work is important to the growth of the field, and the production and distribution of this new research is supported by the ASLA Fund with $2,500 honoraria for accepted papers and free access to LATIS papers for ASLA members (a $50 fee applies for nonmembers). The papers are accompanied by a 10- to 15-question test you give yourself, through which practitioners can earn LA CES approved PDH for an additional fee.

If you are pioneering a new practice area or are successfully using an innovative technique, publicizing your work through LATIS will help increase the fluency in new and developing topics within landscape architecture. Authors of all papers are carefully selected by ASLA, and all papers are subject to a blind review process. ASLA is now accepting proposals for the 2015–2016 LATIS cycle, and accepted LATIS authors will be offered honoraria of $2,500 for their work.

If you’re interested, email Shawn Balon, ASLA, the Professional Practice Manager, at sbalon@asla.org for additional information. Responses to the LATIS Call for Abstracts must be received by COB on Friday, August 14, 2015, to be considered for the 2015–2016 LATIS publications.

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IMG_7846 In a profession as diverse as landscape architecture, it can be hard to get a sense of how the profession is performing as a whole. So each quarter, ASLA sends out its Business Quarterly Survey to a wide variety of firm types to get a snapshot of the profession’s health. The survey helps measure activity in firms’ billable hours, inquiries for new work, and hiring.

For the second quarter of this year, about 86 percent of firms reported stable to significantly higher billable hours over the previous quarter, which is slightly better than reported for the same quarter of 2014. About 84 percent said inquiries for new work were stable to significantly higher in quarter two. Slightly fewer than half (48 percent) said they plan to hire in the coming quarter; during the first quarter, the figure was 62 percent.

The survey also asked firms about their recruiting approaches and the use of social media. Although nearly 42 percent of respondents said they use social media in recruiting, only 16 percent said they think a potential job candidate should have strong social media skills.

For the full news release and highlights from the 2015 second quarter BQS, visit ASLA’s website here.

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The Bradford Williams Medal is awarded to two outstanding articles in landscape every year.

Great writing about landscape architecture and related topics should be celebrated, and one of the ways LAM does that is with the Bradford Williams Medal. The medal is awarded every year to two articles, one that has run in LAM and one from an outside publication, that told compelling stories and left us understanding the subjects from the inside out. LAM’s Editorial Advisory Committee nominates articles and chooses winners from the nominees.


“Fresno V. Eckbo” by Mimi Zeiger from the December 2014 issue of LAM.

This year the medal winner for an article in LAM is Mimi Zeiger, for her story “Fresno v. Eckbo” in the December 2014 issue. Zeiger focuses on the struggling downtown area of Fresno, and proposed changes to the pedestrian-oriented Fulton Mall, originally designed by Garrett Eckbo, that are intended to revitalize the area at the expense of its design history.

Stay tuned for an announcement of the medal winner for an article outside LAM.

The medal’s namesake, Bradford Williams, was an editor and publisher of LAM in its earlier days when it was Landscape Architecture Quarterly. The medal was named to honor his contributions to the magazine and to ASLA. A list of past winners can be found here.

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