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The Bradford Williams Medal is awarded to two outstanding articles in landscape every year.

Great writing about landscape architecture and related topics should be celebrated, and one of the ways LAM does that is with the Bradford Williams Medal. The medal is awarded every year to two articles, one that has run in LAM and one from an outside publication, that told compelling stories and left us understanding the subjects from the inside out. LAM’s Editorial Advisory Committee nominates articles and chooses winners from the nominees.

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“Fresno V. Eckbo” by Mimi Zeiger from the December 2014 issue of LAM.

This year the medal winner for an article in LAM is Mimi Zeiger, for her story “Fresno v. Eckbo” in the December 2014 issue. Zeiger focuses on the struggling downtown area of Fresno, and proposed changes to the pedestrian-oriented Fulton Mall, originally designed by Garrett Eckbo, that are intended to revitalize the area at the expense of its design history.

Stay tuned for an announcement of the medal winner for an article outside LAM.

The medal’s namesake, Bradford Williams, was an editor and publisher of LAM in its earlier days when it was Landscape Architecture Quarterly. The medal was named to honor his contributions to the magazine and to ASLA. A list of past winners can be found here.

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After 10 years of evolution, the green roof of the American Society of Landscape Architects is producing a new and varied crop. Photo courtesy of the American Society of Landscape Architects.

After 10 years of evolution, the green roof of the American Society of Landscape Architects is producing a new and varied crop.

We recently came across this piece by Brittany Patterson at E&E Publishing on green roofs in the nation’s capital and their enormous (and necessary) benefits, which was originally published behind E&E’s paywall. E&E, which does excellent daily reporting on climate change and energy issues, has kindly allowed us to repost the article in full.

 

NATION’S CAPITAL BECOMES GREEN ROOF CAPITAL TO FIGHT EXTREME HEAT, HEAVY STORMS

BRITTANY PATTERSON, E&E PUBLISHING, LLC, JUNE 9, 2015

Nestled on Eye Street in downtown Washington, D.C., near the heart of the bustling city lies the headquarters of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA).

From the front, the brick building looks like any other in the neighborhood, but take the elevator and a flight of stairs to the roof and you’ll find yourself surrounded by rows of green Sedum, blooming prickly pear cactus, and patches of lush butterfly milkweed and hare’s-foot clover. It’s almost possible to imagine you are sitting in the tranquil countryside, not just on the roof of a building covered in foliage.

As relaxing as they can be, green roofs are more than just easy on the eyes.

“Green roofs deliver multiple benefits for both combating heat and in the retention of stormwater,” said Kate Johnson, a program analyst with the District Department of the Environment (DDOE). “Both are issues we think are going to continue to be important in light of climate change. It’s projected to get hotter, and it’s projected we’ll have more extreme rain events.”

(more…)

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Stone Brewing World Bistro & Cardens, San Diego, a one-star SITES pilot project by Schmidt Design Group.

Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens, San Diego, a one-star SITES pilot project by Schmidt Design Group.

Today is a big day for what has long been known as the Sustainable Sites Initiative, now known as SITES, the rating system for developing sustainable landscapes. SITES is now under the administration of Green Business Certification Inc., or GBCI, based in Washington, D.C., which also runs the LEED rating system for buildings, after which SITES is modeled.

With this acquisition, GBCI is now taking applications for certifying landscape projects under the SITES v2 Rating System, and will also administer professional credentialing for the program.

SITES, begun a decade ago, was developed in a collaboration among the American Society of Landscape Architects (the publisher of LAM), the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas at Austin, and the United States Botanic Garden. ASLA and UT, the owners of SITES, have transferred full ownership to GBCI. Its purpose is to guide development projects of all scales, from residential gardens to national parks, toward rigorous measures of stewardship for land and other resources. SITES certification criteria—refined through expert advice from professionals in numerous disciplines, case study examples, and more than 100 pilot projects—account for environmental factors in landscape design such as water use, stormwater handling, wildlife and habitat protection, air quality, and energy use, as well as human health and recreation. Forty-six projects so far have earned SITES certification. (ASLA members are eligible for discounts on all SITES materials and certification.)

“It’s exciting to see years of work developing and field-testing SITES culminate with the availability of this rating system,” said Frederick R. Steiner, FASLA, the dean of the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin.

Nancy Somerville, Honorary ASLA, the executive vice president and CEO of ASLA, said: “GBCI will take SITES to the next level and ensure its future growth and influence.”

A full news release on the SITES acquisition can be found here. For more information, visit sustainablesites.org.

Credit: Schmidt Design Group Inc.

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June’s issue of LAM looks at the tough choices that landscape architecture firms, such as Sasaki Associates and OLIN, must face when updating for a new era; the rustic landscape of a house in Northern California by Lutsko Associates, a winner of a 2013 ASLA Professional Honor Award; and we visit New York City’s biggest secret, Governors Island, the first phase of which opened to the public last year with designs by West8 Urban Design & Landscape Architecture.

In departments, Michael Cannell interviews the computer scientist Ioannis Karamouzas about the anticipatory nature of people in crowds; New York State’s new “unwanted” list of invasive plants, fish, invertebrates, and vertebrates outright bans the use of some fan favorites; and Louisville’s tree canopy is disappearing by approximately 54,000 trees a year, according to a new report by the Davey Resource Group. All this plus our regular Now, Species, Goods, and Books columns. The full table of contents for June can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating June articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Treasure Island,” © Iwan Baan; “The Shelter of Oaks,” Marion Brenner, Affiliate ASLA; “Crowd Computing,” Ioannis Karamouzas; “Don’t Bring It Here,” “Flowering Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) Somewhere in Massachusetts, USA” by Liz West is licensed under CC by 2.0; “A Canopy in Crisis,” Courtesy Davey Resource Group.

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Professional Practice Networks (PPNs) are great resources for members of ASLA. The 20 networks represent the diversity of topics important to the practice of landscape architecture, and each provides the opportunity to share information with other members connected to that particular network. The concerns of the newest network, Environmental Justice, have recently been much on the minds of practitioners and educators alike in new and evolving ways, reflecting design professionals’ desire to help right current social injustices that are knowingly, and unknowingly, inflicted upon others. And it is a topic that some practitioners feel should be more integrated in today’s practice.

Kathleen King, Associate ASLA, a landscape designer at Design Workshop in Denver, is a co-chair of the Environmental Justice PPN. “Landscape architects have a really important role in the sociology of places,” King says. The other co-chair is Julie Stevens, assistant professor of landscape architecture at Iowa State University. “There are a few design firms dedicated to… environmental justice, and then there’s everybody else. And I think that this is not a topic that has to be exclusive to a certain number of firms… I think everybody needs to start embracing these projects,” Stevens says.

King spoke on a panel about social justice at the 2014 ASLA Annual Meeting in Denver, along with Diane Jones Allen, ASLA; Kurt D. Culbertson, FASLA; Randolph T. Hester Jr., FASLA; and Anne Whiston Spirn, FASLA. They talked about the role of environmental justice in their careers. The response was overwhelming; students and professionals alike inundated them with requests for more information. “We’re going to figure out what this really means for landscape architecture,” King says.

Members of ASLA can join one Professional Practice Network for free, with a yearly charge of $15 added for each additional network. For more information on the new Environmental Justice and other PPNs, visit ASLA’s PPN website.

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United States Capitol dome under restoration. Photo Architect of the Capitol

United States Capitol dome under restoration. Photo Architect of the Capitol

A monthly bit of headline news from ASLA’s national office.

It’s April, which at ASLA headquarters in Washington means that Advocacy Day is nigh—Thursday, April 23. Every year around this time, hundreds of ASLA members come to town ahead of the midyear meetings of the Society’s Board of Trustees and Chapter Presidents Council to spend a day on Capitol Hill visiting the offices of their senators and representatives to make the case for national issues that are important to landscape architects.

This year, the focus of advocacy efforts is on three issues: the reauthorization and full funding of the Transportation Alternatives Program and the Land and Water Conservation Fund, and the authorization and funding (at $100 million) of the National Park Service Centennial Challenge. Advocacy Day is about showing strength in numbers. But the individual work of telling Congress what landscape architects do and why it matters never stops—especially because design in the public realm helps create new jobs, stimulate consumer spending, increase property values, and, in turn, generate billions in new federal, state, and local tax revenues. Even design professionals not planning to take part in Advocacy Day activities should stay aware of how these issues are moving, or not, in Washington, and keep in touch with the members and staff of their congressional delegations.

Each day, Roxanne Blackwell, Mark Cason, and Leighton Yates of ASLA’s government affairs staff work with legislators on issues of importance to the profession, and you should follow them on Twitter at @ASLA_Advocacy. But members of Congress really sit up and listen to the concerns of individual constituents and business owners. To help acquaint you with ways to communicate with Congress, the government affairs staff will hold a webinar tomorrow, April 9, from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m. Eastern. You can register to join the webinar here. Questions? ASLA’s government affairs staff is happy to help. Contact the director of federal government affairs, Roxanne Blackwell, at rblackwell@asla.org.

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To see individual values by state, please click here, or the picture, for a full interactive map.

From the March 2015 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

When you have more states with licensure for landscape architecture (all 50 now since 2010), you can expect growing numbers of landscape architects. In January, Julia Lent, ASLA’s managing director of government affairs, counted, as she does every couple of years, the names of resident licensees on each state’s licensure rolls and found there are currently 16,436 landscape architects in the United States. That’s an increase of 1,359 licensees (or 9 percent) over 2008. If you factor out Colorado, New Hampshire, and Vermont, which were later to licensure, the increase was 6 percent since 2008. Of 35 states with an increase, 19 had an increase of 10 percent or greater. By contrast, the number of architects has risen 3.3 percent since 2008; the number of engineers has risen by 2.7 percent.

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