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Archive for the ‘ASLA’ Category

A monthly roundup of the news, dispatches, and marginalia that caught our eye.

In this dispatch of the Queue, the staff reads up on the latest on the troubled National Flood Insurance Program, considers the legacy of Bunny Mellon, and indulges in a little nostalgia.

 

CATCHING UP WITH…

    • Slate (via Climate Desk) has an article on “Flood Zone Foolishness,” detailing how the very states most at risk are blocking reforms to the National Flood Insurance Program. In the November 2013 issue, we ran an interview with the project lead on the plan that recommended changes to the program (“The Risk Picture”) and the likely uptick in consumer premiums.
    • Lawrence Halprin (posthumously), along with Lawrence Noble (sculptor) and George Lucas (owner), will receive the Henry Hering Memorial Medal for Art and Architecture from the National Sculpture Society (founded 1893) for their outstanding collaboration on the Letterman Digital Arts Center in the Presidio in San Francisco.

 

FIELD STUDIES

 

OUT AND ABOUT

    • Deadline approaching for this radically hybrid art/geography/landscape/performance event: The Anthropocene, Cabinet of Curiosities Slam, to be held at the University of Wisconsin–Madison November 8–10, 2014. The conference will feature a keynote address from Elizabeth Kolbert, author of The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History and Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Change.
    • The Cultural Landscape Foundation unveils its 2014 season of events, which includes What’s Out There Weekends in Miami, Richmond, Virginia, and Los Angeles; the Garden Dialogues series; and a land-art theme for Landslide.
    • The Middle East Smart Landscape Summit 2014 will be held in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, May 6–7, 2014.

 

DISTRACT ME FROM MY DEADLINE DEPT.

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Shangri La Botanical Gardens, Jeffrey Carbo Landscape Architects. 2012 ASLA Award, General Design.

Shangri La Botanical Gardens, Jeffrey Carbo Landscape Architects. 2012 ASLA Award, General Design.

Another ASLA Professional Awards cycle is upon us! This is your yearly chance to get your best work in front of a fantastic jury and potentially broadcast to a global audience of your peers and potential clients. If your work is honored, it will be published in LAM’s annual awards issue in October. The awards will be presented at the ASLA Annual Meeting & EXPO in Denver in November.

Some people don’t enter because they’re shy or believe their projects won’t catch the jury’s attention. But you must play to win: “My advice: Believe in your work,” says Jeffrey Carbo, FASLA, of Jeffrey Carbo Landscape Architects & Site Planners in Alexandria, Louisiana. Carbo’s first national ASLA award, for the Cane River Residence in 2005, came on his third try. That award “was a springboard to other projects, including the project that won an award in 2012,” which was the Shangri La Botanical Gardens in Orange, Texas.

 

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 A monthly roundup of the news, dispatches, and marginalia that caught our eye.

CATCHING UP WITH…

 

FIELD STUDIES

 

OUT AND ABOUT

    • The Cities and Nature: Urban Ecological Design and Planning conference at the University of Texas at Austin (February 27–March 1, 2014) will reprise the ground-breaking conference that led to Ecological Design and Planning (1997).
    • A bit late but worth keeping an eye on: the Rivers of the Anthropocene project just held its first conference  at Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis. The event brought an international group together to focus on “rivers and their landscapes as human-nature entanglements,” particularly the Ohio and Tyne River systems.

 

DISTRACT ME FROM MY DEADLINE DEPT.

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Edison Park Site Proposal: A raised circulation system embraces a contained dredge production facility. Images courtesy of Matthew D. Moffitt.

Edison Park Site Proposal: A raised circulation system embraces a contained dredge production facility. Images courtesy of Matthew D. Moffitt.

The Penn State undergraduate Matthew Moffitt won the 2013 ASLA Student Award of Excellence in General Design by showing that not all dredge is created equal. Moffitt’s project, Dredge City: Sediment Catalysis, uses dredged material from the Maumee River, a tributary of Lake Erie, to restore a brownfield site, reestablish migratory bird stopovers, and connect urban and ecological systems, all in the context of an elegantly detailed park. By processing the material dredged from a shipping channel on the Maumee, Moffitt looked at Toledo, Ohio, the most heavily dredged port in the Great Lakes, and asked how one of the lake’s greatest polluters—the Maumee dumps a considerable amount of phosphorous into Lake Erie, causing algae blooms among other problems—can become a source of lifeblood for the city. We talked with Moffitt, who now works at Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, about how he conceived the project and how dredge is becoming a hot research topic.

How did you become interested in dredging as a source of remediation?
The project originally began as a studio project during my senior year at Penn State. The studio origins were in Toledo, Ohio, so that’s how it all began. My professor, Sean Burkholder, is very knowledgeable about dredge and is often working in the greater Ohio region. There are several postindustrial sites in Toledo along the Maumee River, and the river feeds into the Western Basin of Lake Erie. We were given one of several sites along the river, and the site I chose was Edison Park. The challenges of the site included [combined sewer] outfall, dumping postindustrial material, and adjacency to one of the newer bridges and the downtown skyline.

His studio prompt was very inspiring, and from there I started making the connections between dredged material and the sediment itself, and from there it blossomed. The general goal for the studio was to use dredge or sediment from the shipping channel for a park design. The assignment was pretty broad, so we had a lot of room to use our imaginations.

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LAM Arrives at the 2013 ASLA Expo in Boston.

LAM Arrives at the 2013 ASLA Expo in Boston.

The ASLA Annual Meeting & EXPO begins in Boston this Friday, and LAM will be there! Look for Editor-in-Chief Brad McKee and Writer/Editor Jennifer Reut, who will be hosting Meet the Editor sessions on the EXPO floor on Saturday and Sunday. Meeting attendees who’ve signed up for time slots can talk with them about article ideas or projects that might be of interest to our readers.

McKee will present this year’s Landscape Architecture Magazine Advertising Awards, also known as the Lammys, on Friday evening. Organized by LAM’s publisher, Ann Looper, Honorary ASLA, the awards recognize excellence in graphics, messages, and persuasiveness among the magazine’s advertisers. A jury made up of ASLA members from various practice and geographic areas represents the readership and chooses the winners, giving feedback on what kinds of ads catch the attention of landscape architects.

Among their many activities at EXPO, Reut and McKee will be attending meetings, stepping into Education and Learning Lab sessions, and, fresh off our November issue that focused on climate change, McKee will moderate the ASLA Open Forum on Climate Change at 11:00 a.m. on Sunday. You can also follow Reut on Twitter during the EXPO @JenniferEditor.

I will be on the EXPO floor on Saturday to tour the booths and look for products to include in future Goods columns. In 2014 we’ll have columns on new plant varieties, furniture for residential and public spaces, water and irrigation, fences, play equipment, and more. If you’re going to be at EXPO, keep an eye out for the LAM staff and introduce yourself.

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LAM-Jan2013-Interview-HalfDome

From the January 2013 issue of LAM:

By Lydia W. Lee

Even though Alexander Dunkel, Student ASLA, has never visited the High Line in New York City, he can tell you exactly what part of the park is the most popular: the 10th Avenue Square. How? He spent a year analyzing Flickr, the popular image web site, and seeing where people take the most photos. Because many of the images in Flickr collections are tagged with their precise geographic location as well as a descriptor (“Golden Gate Bridge,” for example), Dunkel was able to generate maps of an area’s most frequently photographed subjects. From his home in Dresden, Germany, he spoke about his research at the University of California, Berkeley, which won a 2012 ASLA Student Honor Award.

What inspired you to study Flickr?

Flickr is a unique source of data that shows how people interact with the landscape. Some people take pictures all the time, some people only take a picture of things that are really important to them, but if you look at the whole data set, you see what the majority opinion is.

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A JUNGLE IN PHOENIX

Landscape Structures’ booth at the ASLA EXPO in Phoenix

A jungle in the middle of the desert is surprising enough, but it’s even more startling when it’s in the middle of the Phoenix Convention Center. Landscape Structures wowed the crowd at the ASLA EXPO today with its plant-themed play structure, complete with climbing elements and slides.

The ASLA EXPO is the only show where every one of the exhibitors is relevant to landscape architects, and the attendees of the 2012 Annual Meeting are making the most of the opportunity to check out products they can use in their work. If you’re at the meeting, don’t miss the chance to see what’s here. And if you can’t make it, keep an eye on LAM’s Goods column to see some of what you missed.

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