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LAM_Oct15_Cover

Whether you’re a professional working on a downtown plaza or a student hoping to shape the future landscape, it’s time to show off your finest work. ASLA is now accepting submissions for its 2016 Professional and Student Awards. Professionals have until March 18 to submit their work, and students have until May 13 (yes, that’s after semester’s end, we hope).

As ever, the competition will be tough, but the opportunity for recognition is well worth the time and effort in submitting. “It’s an honor to be selected by your peers from among hundreds of submissions as one of the best in landscape architecture from around the globe,” says Carolyn Mitchell, ASLA’s Honors & Awards Coordinator.

Once selected, winners will be featured in the annual awards issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine and at the 2016 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO, held this year in New Orleans, October 21-24, 2016.

For more information, please click here.

 

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One of the many peer-led sessions from the 2015 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO held in Chicago.

Until January 28, ASLA is accepting session proposals for the 2016 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO, which will be held this year in New Orleans (yes, it is exciting) October 21–24.

The possibilities are broad. New topics, such as research into the mechanics behind a design, are always welcome to help push the knowledge discussion forward. But there is always an eager audience for familiar topics, says Emily O’Connor, the Education Programs Administrator at ASLA. “Residential design and sustainable development have been popular sessions in past meetings,” O’Connor says. But time is running out. Refine your topic, round up any other panelists you might invite, and get your proposal in!

For more information, please visit here.

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LAM rings in the new year with 300 Ivy in San Francisco by Fletcher Studio, winner of a 2015 ASLA Professional Honor Award in Residential Design; the Fayetteville 2030: Food City Scenario, developed by the University of Arkansas Community Design Center in Fayetteville, Arkansas, which aims to bring food security to local residents; Buhl Community Park, by Andrea Cochran Landscape Architecture, which reimagines a historic square in the center of Pittsburgh; and a look at national park “extremes” across the United States helps to kick off the centenary year of the National Park Service.

In Interview, Gwen McGinn’s research probes the little-known world of urban tree root growth, and won a 2015 ASLA Student Award in Research; and in Office, three types of landscape architecture firms describe what they look for in new employees. And don’t miss our regular Now, Species, Goods, and Books columns. The full table of contents for January can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating January articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Peak Condo,” Bruce Damonte; “The Next Meal,” University of Arkansas Community Design Center; “Ephemera, Here to Stay,” Marion Brenner, Affiliate ASLA; “The Mostest American Treasures,” http://www.shutterstock.com/Doug Meek; “A World Underground,” Gwendolyn Dora McGinn, Associate ASLA; “Got the Job,” Richard Johnson.

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stair-cross-section

The redesign will open the stairwell for better light circulation. Credit: Gensler.

For the next eight months or so, the ASLA national headquarters building, located in the heart of Chinatown in Washington, D.C., will undergo renovations to transform its outdated interior into the new ASLA Center for Landscape Architecture. The society sees the renovations, designed by D.C.-based Gensler, as an opportunity to fully represent the “image and ethic of its great profession.” The ASLA staff is eager to see the sunlight-filled space and a vast, open-floor layout for conferences and events.

Starting December 16, ASLA will be temporarily relocated to 601 13th Street NW in Washington, D.C., while renovations take place. All staff phone and emails will remain the same, and any mail addressed to ASLA should continue to be sent to 636 I Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20001.

While all of ASLA’s many services will be available during this time, ASLA’s library and archival collection will be temporarily unavailable, including all awards materials, membership handbooks, past LAM issues, and Fellows files. However, Brooke Hinrichs, ASLA’s Research/Collections Analyst, will still be able to access the Fellows database and conduct searches for magazine citations. For more information or library contact info, please visit here.

For more information on the new ASLA Center for Landscape Architecture, please visit here.

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Credit: David Wilson [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

It’s that time of year again, and the Landscape Architecture Magazine team is off to sweet home Chicago [Many LAM staff hail from Chicago.—Ed.] for the 2015 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO. Here are just a few places to find us during the meeting:

Editor Brad McKee will be a panelist on From the Editor’s Desk: Navigating the Modern Media (SUN-A08), at 11:00 a.m. on Sunday, 11/8. He will also be moderating Hybrid Practices (FRI-B02), at 10:30 a.m. on Friday, 11/6, and Inside the LA Studio with Hollander Design (SAT-A02), at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday 11/7.

The staff will also be attending the Landscape Architecture Magazine Advertising Awards (aka the”LAMMYs”) on Friday, 11/6, the ASLA Student and Professional Awards Ceremony on Monday, 11/9, and the second annual Edible Landscape Celebration on Saturday, 11/7. Tickets are still available for this event, but it will sell out.

LAM editors will be on hand for Meet the Editors in the EXPO hall on Saturday and Sunday to hear about those new projects and story ideas, so sign up if you’d like to pitch your project.  New to Meet the Editors this year is LAM Art Director Chris McGee, who will be available for photography reviews. There are still a few spots left, so be sure to snag yours before they’re all gone!

In between sessions you can find us at the LAM table in ASLA Central on Saturday and Sunday. Drop by and introduce yourself and be sure follow us on Twitter @landarchmag throughout the meeting—remember to use #ASLA2015 on Instagram and Twitter! If you see us in a session or event, be sure to say hello—we love to meet readers and hear what they think about the magazine and the blog.

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Credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture (Flickr: Pollinator 2) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

This is a big year for pollinators at ASLA. Not just because of recent ASLA advocacy efforts for legislation protecting and enhancing pollinators and their habitats in the United States, but also because of ASLA’s involvement in the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge, a new White House initiative aimed at creating a million new pollinator-friendly gardens within the next two years. Disappearing habitat, lack of native plants, pesticides, and unknown forces are leading to the frightening loss of pollinators, and the White House is calling on the nation to step up its game.

Mark Cason, the government affairs manager at ASLA (and our friendly floormate), is leading the pollinator advocacy projects. He sees landscape architects as poised to help rebuild pollinator populations. “ASLA is promoting the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge as a way to engage landscape architects to incorporate pollinator-friendly habitats in their designs,” says Cason. Providing for pollinators might seem like a no-brainer, but a study last year found pesticides toxic to bees covering plants marketed as “bee-friendly”; this problem underlines the need to do more. If we protect pollinators, we protect ourselves.

For more information on the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge, please visit here.

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BY GARY HILDERBRAND, FASLA

Dan Kiley's South Garden at the Art Institute of Chicago has seasoned over nearly 50 years into a rugged, magical hawthorn canopy.

Dan Kiley’s South Garden at the Art Institute of Chicago has seasoned over nearly 50 years into a rugged, magical hawthorn canopy.

From the October 2015 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

There is nothing quite like sitting beneath the almost fully connective canopy of 50-year-old cockspur hawthorns in Dan Kiley’s South Garden at the Art Institute of Chicago in early summer. The 32 trees at the center of the garden, set in a 20-foot grid, reached their natural maximum height long ago. Their wily trunks have thickened and twisted with age; their craggy, wandering branches continued to elongate, eventually overlapping and intertwining, creating a space that has a level of repose perhaps unequaled in a midcentury urban landscape space. Crataegus crus-galli has narrow, waxy, obovate leaves, which are naturally held upright at the tops of the branches, suggesting intolerance for shade; they filter a kaleidoscope of sunlight and shadow onto the warm brown crushed-stone paving below. Reflections from the water surface and gravel color the air. Though generally I find the modernist conceit of describing “rooms” in landscapes inadequate or ill-suited, this canopy explicitly creates a ceiling and produces a dazzling sense of interiority within the garden’s sunken court space. It’s hard to believe you are sitting within 150 feet of Chicago’s main drag.

Michigan Avenue, the historic eastern anchor of Chicago’s exalted grid, attracts hordes of traffic and tourists to its institutions, architectural sites, and parks. There are excellent urban landscapes to see here, including the Lurie Garden, Maggie Daley Park, Grant Park, and the grounds of the Field Museum. None is more tranquil than the South Garden. Peter Schaudt, one of Chicago’s most admired landscape architects, considered it Chicago’s best landscape space. This year, ASLA conferred its Landmark Award to the project, which recognizes works between 15 and 50 years old that retain their design integrity and benefit to the public realm. At about its 50-year mark, the South Garden more than (more…)

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