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Archive for the ‘AWARDS’ Category

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Whether you’re a professional working on a downtown plaza or a student hoping to shape the future landscape, it’s time to show off your finest work. ASLA is now accepting submissions for its 2016 Professional and Student Awards. Professionals have until March 18 to submit their work, and students have until May 13 (yes, that’s after semester’s end, we hope).

As ever, the competition will be tough, but the opportunity for recognition is well worth the time and effort in submitting. “It’s an honor to be selected by your peers from among hundreds of submissions as one of the best in landscape architecture from around the globe,” says Carolyn Mitchell, ASLA’s Honors & Awards Coordinator.

Once selected, winners will be featured in the annual awards issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine and at the 2016 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO, held this year in New Orleans, October 21-24, 2016.

For more information, please click here.

 

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LAM rings in the new year with 300 Ivy in San Francisco by Fletcher Studio, winner of a 2015 ASLA Professional Honor Award in Residential Design; the Fayetteville 2030: Food City Scenario, developed by the University of Arkansas Community Design Center in Fayetteville, Arkansas, which aims to bring food security to local residents; Buhl Community Park, by Andrea Cochran Landscape Architecture, which reimagines a historic square in the center of Pittsburgh; and a look at national park “extremes” across the United States helps to kick off the centenary year of the National Park Service.

In Interview, Gwen McGinn’s research probes the little-known world of urban tree root growth, and won a 2015 ASLA Student Award in Research; and in Office, three types of landscape architecture firms describe what they look for in new employees. And don’t miss our regular Now, Species, Goods, and Books columns. The full table of contents for January can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating January articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Peak Condo,” Bruce Damonte; “The Next Meal,” University of Arkansas Community Design Center; “Ephemera, Here to Stay,” Marion Brenner, Affiliate ASLA; “The Mostest American Treasures,” http://www.shutterstock.com/Doug Meek; “A World Underground,” Gwendolyn Dora McGinn, Associate ASLA; “Got the Job,” Richard Johnson.

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BY GARY HILDERBRAND, FASLA

Dan Kiley's South Garden at the Art Institute of Chicago has seasoned over nearly 50 years into a rugged, magical hawthorn canopy.

Dan Kiley’s South Garden at the Art Institute of Chicago has seasoned over nearly 50 years into a rugged, magical hawthorn canopy.

From the October 2015 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

There is nothing quite like sitting beneath the almost fully connective canopy of 50-year-old cockspur hawthorns in Dan Kiley’s South Garden at the Art Institute of Chicago in early summer. The 32 trees at the center of the garden, set in a 20-foot grid, reached their natural maximum height long ago. Their wily trunks have thickened and twisted with age; their craggy, wandering branches continued to elongate, eventually overlapping and intertwining, creating a space that has a level of repose perhaps unequaled in a midcentury urban landscape space. Crataegus crus-galli has narrow, waxy, obovate leaves, which are naturally held upright at the tops of the branches, suggesting intolerance for shade; they filter a kaleidoscope of sunlight and shadow onto the warm brown crushed-stone paving below. Reflections from the water surface and gravel color the air. Though generally I find the modernist conceit of describing “rooms” in landscapes inadequate or ill-suited, this canopy explicitly creates a ceiling and produces a dazzling sense of interiority within the garden’s sunken court space. It’s hard to believe you are sitting within 150 feet of Chicago’s main drag.

Michigan Avenue, the historic eastern anchor of Chicago’s exalted grid, attracts hordes of traffic and tourists to its institutions, architectural sites, and parks. There are excellent urban landscapes to see here, including the Lurie Garden, Maggie Daley Park, Grant Park, and the grounds of the Field Museum. None is more tranquil than the South Garden. Peter Schaudt, one of Chicago’s most admired landscape architects, considered it Chicago’s best landscape space. This year, ASLA conferred its Landmark Award to the project, which recognizes works between 15 and 50 years old that retain their design integrity and benefit to the public realm. At about its 50-year mark, the South Garden more than (more…)

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

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Credit: © Tom Harris, courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation.

From “The Wild Grid” by Gary Hilderbrand, FASLA, in the October 2015 issue, featuring Dan Kiley’s South Garden at the Art Institute of Chicago, winner of the 2015 ASLA Landmark Award.

“It’s a simple palette of only four colors, yet there’s such a complexity to the layering of shadows and light play.”

—Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

Pick up a free digital issue of the October LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

xxx

Credit: Clementine Inhye Jang, Student ASLA; Michelle Shofet, Student ASLA; and Jia Joy Hu, Student ASLA.

ASLA 2015 Analysis and Planning Student Honor Award winner “Airborne” by Clementine Inhye Jang, Student ASLA, Michelle Shofet, Student ASLA, and Jia Joy Hu, Student ASLA, in the October 2015 issue, features the investigation of designing easement networks through aerial seed transmission.

“This has a mesmerizing perspective with a mysterious quality that presents more questions than answers.”

—Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

Pick up a free digital issue of the October LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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BY CONSTANCE CASEY

BEDIT_Tu_Youyou_in_1950s

Dr. Tu Youyou during the 1950’s.

Artemisia annua, a common roadside weed, is one of the humblest of the several hundred Artemisia species found all around the world. It’s dull and ragged, but it is instrumental in bringing a Chinese scientist to Stockholm to receive a Nobel Prize this December. The species is a shabby version of Artemisia ‘Powis Castle,’ familiar to gardeners for its lacy silvery foliage. Back in the 1960s Dr. Tu Youyou screened 2,000 traditional Chinese remedies in search of a new treatment for malaria. The malaria-causing parasite had grown resistant to quinine and other earlier drugs. Ho Chi Minh, in desperation because his soldiers were dying, appealed to Mao Tse-tung for help, and Mao set Tu to work. She found the clue in a 1,700-year-old manuscript that advised sweet wormwood, Artemisia annua’s common name, for intermittent fevers, a common malaria symptom. She found that an extract of the herbivore-repellent sesquiterpenoid lactones that give Artemisia its distinctive bitter scent killed the malaria-causing parasite. Born in 1930, Tu is still at work at the China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences in Beijing. You (you) go, girl.

Constance Casey, a former New York City Parks Department gardener, is a contributing editor to LAM.

Credit: By Xinhua News agency [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

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October’s LAM is our awards issue, and that means almost 70 pages of Student and Professional Award winners, including the 2015 Landmark Award given to Dan Kiley’s South Garden at the Art Institute of Chicago. Finished in 1962, the South Garden celebrates almost 50 years of continued excellence as both a landscape architecture project and a cherished space in the public realm.

Out of 327 submitted projects to the Student Awards, 23 winners were chosen, with many of the projects highlighting the diversifying nature of landscape architecture. In the Professional Awards, 33 winners were selected from 463 submissions, many of which set the tone for the future of the profession. All this plus our regular Land Matters and Now columns.

You can read the full table of contents for October 2015 or pick up a free digital issue of the October LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating October articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: Landmark Award, © Tom Harris/Courtesy the Cultural Landscape Foundation; Professional Communications Award of Excellence, Landscape Architecture Foundation; Professional Analysis and Planning Award of Excellence, Hargreaves Associates and Red Square; Professional Residential Design Award of Excellence, Hocker Design Group, Robert Yu, Justin Clemons; Professional General Design Award of Excellence, Courtesy Reed Hilderbrand.

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