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Archive for the ‘AWARDS’ Category

BY ELIZABETH PADJEN

Ramps for the 1,400 car garage are camouflaged by walls and plantings.

Ramps for the 1,400-car garage are camouflaged by walls and plantings.

From the October 2014 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

At 10:30 on a July morning, an east wind brings a damp chill off the harbor and gray clouds hang overhead like sodden hammocks. And still, people come to the park. They are everywhere—perched on walls, settled onto benches, hunched over tables outside the café. Some stare into space. Some check out the passersby. Many more peer at screens. It’s a perfect morning for a cozy cup of tea in the hotel across the street or coffee at a nearby Starbucks. That’s where you’d expect all these people to be. Not in a park.

But this is the Norman B. Leventhal Park—better known to Bostonians as Post Office Square or simply P.O. Square, and it is the recipient of ASLA’s 2014 Landmark Award, which honors projects finished between 15 and 50 years ago that have kept their original design integrity and make a major contribution to the civic realm. “The fact that it’s still there, intact, is important,” said one juror. “How many other parks that are 15 years old haven’t been renovated?” Another juror said: “It’s one of the best landscapes in our country, simply for what it did for the financial district. It allowed people to get outside and get some nature in the urban environment.”

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First, here’s the news that Michael van Gessel, the Dutch landscape architect, took his time and a fair bit of teasing indirection to get out last Friday night in Barcelona: The winner of the 2014 Rosa Barba International Landscape Prize is the North Wharf Promenade and Silo Park on the waterfront of Auckland, New Zealand. It was designed by Taylor Cullity Lethlean of Melbourne with Wraight + Associates of Wellington and completed in 2011.

The big announcement came late in the day, near 9:00 p.m. Van Gessel, who served as the president of the six-person Rosa Barba prize jury, sat with his feet propped casually atop a chair on a stage of the astonishing Palau de la Música Catalana—though in the handsome contemporary auditorium belowground, not the 1908 modernista marvel upstairs, designed by Lluis Domènech i Montaner, which at that hour was filling for a dance performance of the Gran Gala Flamenco. In front of van Gessel were several hundred people gathered for the prize announcement as part of the 8th International Biennial of Landscape Architecture, which ran from September 25 to 27. The audience included the designers of the 11 finalist projects for the prize; they each had presented their entry the previous day. There was also a large turnout of landscape architects, academics, and students from Europe and elsewhere.

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From the October 2014 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine:

Several faculty members at different schools recently have told me, unbidden, that remarkable numbers of their landscape architecture students want to find work that has a social impact, such as with a nonprofit or NGO group, after they graduate. To judge by this year’s run of ASLA Student Awards in this issue, it would seem they are having no trouble finding worlds of need. There is a playground designed and built for 350 children at an AIDS orphanage in South Africa, and a project for people in an informal settlement in Lima, Peru. There are two projects that directly benefit military veterans. Another considers the tangible ways people attach to a place as they grow old. And, of course, examples of ecological redemption abound. What I think we are seeing is a natural impulse to do good, compounded by a much greater awareness among young people today of the importance of community service, which is being ingrained in and required of them before they finish high school. Added to that are the signs of starker inequality, food scarcity, and climate volatility that are getting through to students and sticking with them.

In that regard, this issue, with the awards for students plus the ASLA Professional Awards and the Landmark Award, is all good news, which is why we look forward to doing it so much each year. This is our fourth year combining the student and professional awards in one rather mind-opening and deeply heartening package. There are 21 student winners chosen from 313 entries; 34 professional winners emerged from 596 entries. Seriously, if you need a lift as much of the world seems bent on coming unglued, read this magazine.

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CAP TBD  Credit: New Orleans Redevelopment Authority.

A Mardi Gras parade passes by one of the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority’s pilot rain garden lots in Algiers, designed by Spackman Mossop and Michaels. Credit: New Orleans Redevelopment Authority.

This week, the Van Alen Institute announced Future Ground, a new, open, and international competition to develop ideas and policies for dealing with New Orleans’s nearly 30,000 vacant lots and abandoned buildings. Nearly 10 years post-Katrina, New Orleans has thousands of idle urban spaces that the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority, which owns more than 2,000 of them and is a cosponsor of the competition, wants to see turned into community resources.

The Future Ground RFQ stresses the need to develop workable policies for these vacant spaces as well as design solutions. It states that competitors should be multidisciplinary teams of “individuals and firms with expertise in architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, urban planning, graphic design, policy, engineering, finance, real estate, community development, and other fields.” Competing teams need to include local partners. Winning teams, the brief says, will receive $15,000 to work on small projects that can have broader applications and also generate policies that can sustain the program for the next several decades.

This is not Van Alen’s first foray into vacant land—it sponsored the Urban Voids competition back in 2005 for Philadelphia, and this competition is part of the multiyear, multiproject Elsewhere: Escape and the Urban Landscape initiative.

The timeline is short: The deadline for applications is September 29, 2014, and teams will kick off in New Orleans in October 2014 and wrap up by the spring of 2015. You can find the RFQ and more information, including a list  of advisers, local sponsors, and jury members, on the Van Alen Institute site.

Tell us in the comments if you decide to submit, and what intrigues you about this opportunity.

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Interboro Partners

Interboro Team. Courtesy Rebuild by Design.

In the Hurricane Sandy destruction zone today, there were long-awaited exhales to accompany the end of the yearlong competition phase of Rebuild by Design, the federal post-Sandy recovery project. Scores of designers learned which of 10 multidisciplinary teams, and which of the teams’ ideas, will receive federal funding to help make the New York and New Jersey metropolitan region better adapted to fend off huge storms and rising seas in the future.

The announcements of winners were made in two rounds by Shaun Donovan, the secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, who also has served as chair of the federal Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force. Donovan, who is set to leave HUD imminently to become the director of the Office of Management and Budget upon his confirmation by the Senate, announced the winning projects for New York this morning at a public event on the Lower East Side. This afternoon, Donovan announced the winning New Jersey projects in the borough of Little Ferry.

For projects in New York, the winning teams, their project sites, and funding amounts are:

  1. The BIG Team, for its project, the Big U, a flood-protection system designed to run 10 miles around the lower half of Manhattan. Funding: $335 million.
  2. The Interboro Team, for its project, Living with the Bay: A Comprehensive Regional Resiliency Plan for Nassau County’s South Shore. Funding: $125 million.
  3. The team led by SCAPE/Landscape Architecture, for its project, Living Breakwaters, a series of constructed reef habitats along the south shore of Staten Island at Tottenville to slow storm surges and regenerate coastal ecology. Funding: $60 million.
  4. The PennDesign/OLIN team, for its project, Hunts Point Lifelines, a series of flood-protection and infrastructure strategies to protect the one-square-mile Hunts Point peninsula of the Bronx, the hub of a $5 billion annual food industry serving New York City. Funding: $20 million.
MIT

MIT CAU + ZUS + URBANISTEN. Courtesy Rebuild by Design.

For projects in New Jersey, the winning teams, their project sites, and funding amounts are:

  1. The team led by OMA, for Resist, Delay, Store, Discharge: A Comprehensive Strategy for Hoboken, which looks at a variety of ways to handle flash flooding and storm surges in Hoboken as well as in Weehawken and Jersey City. Funding: $230 million.
  2. The team MIT CAU + ZUS + URBANISTEN for New Meadowlands: Productive City + Regional Park. Funding: $150 million.

 

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Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum  by students from Mississippi State University. Rainwater was moved away from and around the north end of the building with a dry swale. Rain collected from the roof is managed in a sand filter, which helps to define an outdoor amphitheater. Image: Cory Gallo

2013 Award of Excellence for Student Collaboration: “Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum” by students from Mississippi State University. Image: Cory Gallo.

We at LAM are big supporters of the ASLA Student Awards and the work of students who, despite thesis deadlines and studio crunch, manage to submit terrific work each year. We publish the winners in our annual awards issue (this year, in October); we cheer them on during the awards ceremony at the ASLA Annual Meeting & EXPO; we feature student work throughout the year.

Communications, Award of Excellence: Above Below Beyond Exhibition by students from Temple University and University of Pennsylvania.

2013 Award of Excellence for Communication: “Above Below Beyond” exhibition by students from Temple University and University of Pennsylvania.

In the past year, we’ve interviewed Zheming Cai about his project, Preservation as Provocation, Matthew Moffitt about Dredge City: Sediment Catalysis, and Chen Chen about her project, The Overlapped City. We’ve also written about Shadeworks, an award winner from University of Colorado Denver, Andrew Thomas Doyle’s project at Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, and Concrete Habitat Units by students at Cal Poly Pomona. There are more to come.

Residential Design, Award of Excellence: Yitian Zhao and Siyu Tian, University of Pennsylvania. Paths of Life site plan.

2013 Award of Excellence for Residential Design: “Paths of Life,” by Yitian Zhao and Siyu Tian, University of Pennsylvania.

So here we are at the end of the semester, and you’re pretty much out of your mind. But we can celebrate your work only if you compete and win! The deadline for applications for the 2014 student awards is Friday, April 25, 2014, and binders must be received by Friday, May 9, 2014. More information can be found on the awards page of the ASLA website. Good luck!

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We are very honored to be finalists in 2014 American Magazine Awards for General Excellence in the Special Interest category, especially considering the excellent other magazines in the group: Modern Farmer, Los Angeles Magazine, Inc., and the Hollywood Reporter.

The whole point of remaking Landscape Architecture Magazine over the past four years has been to bring out of relative obscurity the huge range of the difficult and inventive work that landscape architects are doing to put our treatment of this planet on a better path. The work is happening at all scales. It happens around small creeks, gardens, town streets, and playgrounds on up to whole watersheds, transit systems, and shorelines.

Landscape architects are wise and dedicated people, and many of their best efforts come through in the ways they gather knowledge across a range of other arts and sciences and factor it in to the reality they know better than anyone: What land can and cannot sustain. The thinking is adventurous, and the stories are so good they practically tell themselves. They just need a home, and that’s what the whole LAM staff strives to give them. Of course, we could not do it without our loyal readers or the amazing support we have here at ASLA, which sees LAM as one of the numerous ways it can work to keep pushing  landscape architects to the front of the game in design and environmental stewardship.

 

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