Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘AWARDS’ Category


We are very honored to be finalists in 2014 American Magazine Awards for General Excellence in the Special Interest category, especially considering the excellent other magazines in the group: Modern Farmer, Los Angeles Magazine, Inc., and the Hollywood Reporter.

The whole point of remaking Landscape Architecture Magazine over the past four years has been to bring out of relative obscurity the huge range of the difficult and inventive work that landscape architects are doing to put our treatment of this planet on a better path. The work is happening at all scales. It happens around small creeks, gardens, town streets, and playgrounds on up to whole watersheds, transit systems, and shorelines.

Landscape architects are wise and dedicated people, and many of their best efforts come through in the ways they gather knowledge across a range of other arts and sciences and factor it in to the reality they know better than anyone: What land can and cannot sustain. The thinking is adventurous, and the stories are so good they practically tell themselves. They just need a home, and that’s what the whole LAM staff strives to give them. Of course, we could not do it without our loyal readers or the amazing support we have here at ASLA, which sees LAM as one of the numerous ways it can work to keep pushing  landscape architects to the front of the game in design and environmental stewardship.

 

Read Full Post »

Shangri La Botanical Gardens, Jeffrey Carbo Landscape Architects. 2012 ASLA Award, General Design.

Shangri La Botanical Gardens, Jeffrey Carbo Landscape Architects. 2012 ASLA Award, General Design.

Another ASLA Professional Awards cycle is upon us! This is your yearly chance to get your best work in front of a fantastic jury and potentially broadcast to a global audience of your peers and potential clients. If your work is honored, it will be published in LAM’s annual awards issue in October. The awards will be presented at the ASLA Annual Meeting & EXPO in Denver in November.

Some people don’t enter because they’re shy or believe their projects won’t catch the jury’s attention. But you must play to win: “My advice: Believe in your work,” says Jeffrey Carbo, FASLA, of Jeffrey Carbo Landscape Architects & Site Planners in Alexandria, Louisiana. Carbo’s first national ASLA award, for the Cane River Residence in 2005, came on his third try. That award “was a springboard to other projects, including the project that won an award in 2012,” which was the Shangri La Botanical Gardens in Orange, Texas.

 

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Shute's Folly Island: Redefining Tourism Site Plan. Courtesy Zheming Cai.

Shute’s Folly Island: Redefining Tourism Site Plan. Courtesy Zheming Cai.

Undergraduate Zheming Cai’s ASLA award-winning student project to reimagine the historic military site of Shute’s Folly Island off coastal South Carolina took on the twin behemoths of preservation and tourism and forged them into a refined solution that balanced the site’s architectural and landscape histories. The project, Preservation as Provocation: Redefining Tourism, won a 2013 ASLA Student Honor Award and was praised by the “very impressed” jury for its sophistication. Cai’s design of the historic fortification “broke away from the military history” and “built on other reasons to visit,” according to the comments. Now a student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Cai talked with us about how to use flooding as an interpretive tool for historic places, understanding the genius loci, and taking a landscape perspective on tourism.

You won the ASLA Student Honor Award for a project that was about preservation and tourism in South Carolina while you were a student at Purdue University. Can you tell us how you got interested in these two concepts and how you chose the site?
This was my senior capstone design project. The previous semester, I had taken a more architecturally oriented historic preservation course with Ken Schuette, who is also my adviser. I had focused on community, cultural heritage, and downtown areas, so that took some of my initial interest in that direction. Schuette discovered a student competition for Castle Pinckney sponsored by the American Institute of Architects and the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. He asked me if I had any interest in doing a competition for my capstone, and I said yes, I will do it.

The reason I picked this competition was that I was reading through their brief and they had this attached image of the castle (Castle Pinckney). Lots of my undergrad research is on the genius loci, the spirit of a place, and it reminded me a lot of the picturesque Tintern Abbey kind of image, and that got me really excited. I’m a landscape architect, so I wanted to stick my hat into the ring and do this competition from a landscape perspective. I didn’t win because my project wasn’t architectural enough, which was pretty interesting.

So initially it wasn’t my intention to apply for an ASLA award, but my adviser highly recommended it. At the time, I had graduated already and I was traveling in Yellowstone with my parents, so I had to put it all together in a little cabin.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Edison Park Site Proposal: A raised circulation system embraces a contained dredge production facility. Images courtesy of Matthew D. Moffitt.

Edison Park Site Proposal: A raised circulation system embraces a contained dredge production facility. Images courtesy of Matthew D. Moffitt.

The Penn State undergraduate Matthew Moffitt won the 2013 ASLA Student Award of Excellence in General Design by showing that not all dredge is created equal. Moffitt’s project, Dredge City: Sediment Catalysis, uses dredged material from the Maumee River, a tributary of Lake Erie, to restore a brownfield site, reestablish migratory bird stopovers, and connect urban and ecological systems, all in the context of an elegantly detailed park. By processing the material dredged from a shipping channel on the Maumee, Moffitt looked at Toledo, Ohio, the most heavily dredged port in the Great Lakes, and asked how one of the lake’s greatest polluters—the Maumee dumps a considerable amount of phosphorous into Lake Erie, causing algae blooms among other problems—can become a source of lifeblood for the city. We talked with Moffitt, who now works at Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, about how he conceived the project and how dredge is becoming a hot research topic.

How did you become interested in dredging as a source of remediation?
The project originally began as a studio project during my senior year at Penn State. The studio origins were in Toledo, Ohio, so that’s how it all began. My professor, Sean Burkholder, is very knowledgeable about dredge and is often working in the greater Ohio region. There are several postindustrial sites in Toledo along the Maumee River, and the river feeds into the Western Basin of Lake Erie. We were given one of several sites along the river, and the site I chose was Edison Park. The challenges of the site included [combined sewer] outfall, dumping postindustrial material, and adjacency to one of the newer bridges and the downtown skyline.

His studio prompt was very inspiring, and from there I started making the connections between dredged material and the sediment itself, and from there it blossomed. The general goal for the studio was to use dredge or sediment from the shipping channel for a park design. The assignment was pretty broad, so we had a lot of room to use our imaginations.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

LAM Arrives at the 2013 ASLA Expo in Boston.

LAM Arrives at the 2013 ASLA Expo in Boston.

The ASLA Annual Meeting & EXPO begins in Boston this Friday, and LAM will be there! Look for Editor-in-Chief Brad McKee and Writer/Editor Jennifer Reut, who will be hosting Meet the Editor sessions on the EXPO floor on Saturday and Sunday. Meeting attendees who’ve signed up for time slots can talk with them about article ideas or projects that might be of interest to our readers.

McKee will present this year’s Landscape Architecture Magazine Advertising Awards, also known as the Lammys, on Friday evening. Organized by LAM’s publisher, Ann Looper, Honorary ASLA, the awards recognize excellence in graphics, messages, and persuasiveness among the magazine’s advertisers. A jury made up of ASLA members from various practice and geographic areas represents the readership and chooses the winners, giving feedback on what kinds of ads catch the attention of landscape architects.

Among their many activities at EXPO, Reut and McKee will be attending meetings, stepping into Education and Learning Lab sessions, and, fresh off our November issue that focused on climate change, McKee will moderate the ASLA Open Forum on Climate Change at 11:00 a.m. on Sunday. You can also follow Reut on Twitter during the EXPO @JenniferEditor.

I will be on the EXPO floor on Saturday to tour the booths and look for products to include in future Goods columns. In 2014 we’ll have columns on new plant varieties, furniture for residential and public spaces, water and irrigation, fences, play equipment, and more. If you’re going to be at EXPO, keep an eye out for the LAM staff and introduce yourself.

Read Full Post »

Energy City Framework

Chen used parametric tools to study how new forms of energy production (wind, solar, biomass) can be overlapped with other land uses in urban areas. Images courtesy of Chen Chen.

The Overlapped City was architect Chen Chen’s second ASLA Student Honor award winner, and because of this, it offers a chance to see how ideas and frameworks can grow and mature over the course of graduate education. Chen’s work is notable for its moody, almost dystopian graphic presentation, but it’s her analytical heft that caught the jury’s eye this year. The project distills the spatial implications of energy production, with the city of Houston as a prototype site. We talked with Chen Chen from her Beijing studio, reMIX, about her project, her abiding interest in energy, and the big opportunities that she believes landscape architects are missing.

You won the Student ASLA Honor Award in 2011 (for Vertical Territories, with E. Scott Mitchell and Amy Whitesides) and again in 2013. How would you describe the difference between your projects, and what have you learned and applied in the interim?
The projects share a lot in common. There are continuities of scale, but with quite different topics. Two projects deal with landscape primarily through vertical dimensions, integrating multiple goals, multiple data sets, and a multilayered approach. What is common is the verticality of those two projects, and they both try to deal with problems in [the] context of compact or dense urban environments. Both try to make a synergy between different types [of] land use. For example, both talk about how energy production can be overlapped with open space or landscape or ecological elements. I look at how those functions can work on different elevations to give some productivity to land and open space. Usually, open space in urban areas doesn’t produce any revenue—that’s usually the first thing to be removed when there is a high-pressure urban development. I am trying to look at ways of putting that back in.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

A few of Byxbee Park's hillocks remain where that had been about two dozen. Photo: Lydia Lee

A few of Byxbee Park’s hillocks remain where that had been about two dozen. Photo: Lydia Lee

By Lydia Lee

Byxbee Park is coming apart. The city of Palo Alto is not even pretending to try to hold it together.

Byxbee Park is one of several San Francisco Bay area parks that began as landfills. Starting in the 1960s, garbage dumps along the waterfront were converted to public recreation areas. In Palo Alto, the city hired the landscape architects Hargreaves Associates and the artists Peter Richards and Michael Oppenheimer in 1990 to create a unique collaboration of art and landscape design (LAM, August 2006). The 10 site-specific installations spoke to the area’s evolution over many eons of human use. The 29-acre park opened in 1991; it won a national ASLA Honor Award in 1993.

Now, as the city prepares to open the remaining landfilled area for public use next year, it is destroying several of the original park’s features.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 426 other followers

%d bloggers like this: