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"View along US 40 in Mount Vernon Canyon, Colorado" by Andreas Feininger, 1942.

“View along US 40 in Mount Vernon Canyon, Colorado” by Andreas Feininger, 1942.

The staff of Landscape Architecture Magazine is off to beautiful Denver, Colorado, for the 2014 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO. You can find us in our dedicated space in the EXPO Hall. Look for the LAM logo in the ASLA Commons. Drop by and say hello, or you can find us at any one of the many events and sessions we’re participating in. Here are just a few:

Art Director Chris McGee and Associate Editor Jennifer Reut will be on a panel titled Fit for Print: Landscape Architecture Photos That Work (FRI-C08) at 1:30 p.m. on Friday, 11/21.

Editor Brad McKee is moderating a panel, Design 2034: Our Resilient Tomorrow (FRI-D10), at 3:30 p.m. on Friday, 11/21.

The staff will be in attendance at the Landscape Architecture Magazine Advertising Awards (LAMMYs) on Friday, 11/21 and the ASLA Student and Professional Awards Ceremony on Monday, 11/24.

LAM editors will be on hand for Meet the Editors on Saturday and Sunday.

We’re all really looking forward to the Edible Landscapes Celebration on Saturday, 11/20.

Throughout the meeting the LAM staff will be on the floor in the EXPO hall as well as helping out in sessions and events. Follow us on Twitter @landarchmag throughout the meeting, or stop by the LAM booth, or just introduce yourself—we love to meet readers and hear what they think about the magazine and the blog.

Credit: FSA/OWI collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540.

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Close-up view of a moveable climate station.

Close-up view of a movable climate station.

From the November 2014 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Reid Fellenbaum

Reid Fellenbaum, Student Affiliate ASLA

It’s 2080, a world deep in the throes of a changing climate where a landscape’s fertility is analyzed by mammoth structures that roam the Great Plains. It may seem like a scene from a sci-fi novel, but it is actually the basis for Reid Fellenbaum’s “Meridian of Fertility,” winner of the 2014 ASLA Student Award of Excellence in Analysis and Planning, which examines historical practices, climate models, projected precipitation, temperature, and current soil quality of the Great Plains region and suggests that the “Meridian of Fertility,” a geographical dividing line between prairie lands to the west and areas suitable for agricultural practices to the east, is steadily moving eastward. The project proposes a series of shelterbelts to slow this migration, as well as a return to dry-farming practices (a no-irrigation method that relies on the conservation of soil moisture) informed by structures called climate stations that use “hyperlocal climate predictions” to determine the best site for farmers to plant their crops. We talked with Fellenbaum about his project, and how he sees it as a focus on resiliency in a changing world.

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BEDIT_Fore-Now_Joe-lalli-principal-1022

Joseph J. Lalli. Photo courtesy EDSA

Joseph J. Lalli, FASLA, the chairman and former president of the firm EDSA, died October 25 at his home in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, after a brief illness. He was 71.

Lalli joined EDSA in 1968 and became president of the firm in 1994, succeeding Edward Durell Stone Jr., who founded the firm in 1960. During Lalli’s tenure, he led a significant expansion of the firm, which is known particularly for its resort designs, to one that now has 120 employees in six offices. He had more than 500 projects to his credit in 40 countries. EDSA was among the first landscape architecture firms to work in China beginning in 2001. Among its numerous awards, EDSA received the ASLA Landscape Architecture Firm Award in 2010.

“He was a very accomplished artist and a design person, a creative thinker, and he was able to take that creative aspect and transfer it to the business side,” said Doug Smith, ASLA, the president of EDSA since 2012, who was hired by Lalli in 1987. “He was an unconventional thinker.” When EDSA first began working in China, Western firms faced a tight, bureaucratic process that required their forming a joint venture with a Chinese firm. “He orchestrated a lot of very complicated aspects of that,” Smith says. An early joint venture, EDSAOrient, remains active in Beijing, and an EDSA office opened in Shanghai in 2013. The firm won an Honor Award for General Design in 2010 for the Crosswaters Ecolodge in China’s Guangdong Province. The firm has also worked frequently in the Caribbean region.

Lalli’s global success was unaccompanied by bluster; his colleagues describe him as a persuasive leader, yet a modest and taciturn person—and a generous one. “You really had to listen to Joe and pull things out of him,” said Lucinda Sanders, FASLA, the chief executive officer of OLIN. “I saw him as a selfless person. He gave to anybody around him. He gave very quietly. He taught us so much about goodness and the suspension of ego.”

“He was a man of such few, elegant words,” said Joe Brown, FASLA, the retired chief innovation officer of AECOM. “He was such a remarkably nice man, a gentleman competitor.”

Lalli was born in Geneva, New York. He received his bachelor’s degree in landscape architecture at Cornell University and his master’s in landscape architecture at the University of Michigan. Aside from his ASLA fellowship, he was a past cochair of the CEO Roundtable and a former member of the board of the Landscape Architecture Foundation.

He is survived by his wife, Jeanne Dawson-Lalli, and two brothers, Vincent Lalli and Anthony Lalli.

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The 272-page November issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine is the biggest of the year, if not the past five. Why the extra muscle? Perhaps abundance is in the air: This year’s ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO in Denver is looking to be one of our biggest ever.

This year, the ASLA Award of Excellence in General Design went to Gustafson Guthrie Nichol for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation headquarters in Seattle. Despite the difficulties the central Seattle site provides, the site’s landscape design echoes its past as a bog, and its present as a centrifuge of global and local ethics. In “Fire, Rain, Beetles, and Us,” Carol Becker looks at the interconnected catastrophes recently visited on the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. “Fluid Boundaries” finds the Colorado River reflow (“A Spring Flush on the Colorado,” April 24, 2014) is just one of several transnational projects to kick-start the riparian wetland along the Colorado River. Jayson DeGeeter, ASLA, talks to Guy Sternberg, the oak guru, about the species and his calling at Starhill Forest Arboreteum. “Detroit from the Ground Up” finds that landscape architecture is playing a major role in Detroit’s revitalization. And the photographer Alex MacLean and the journalist Daniel Grossman investigate the beginning and the end of the transborder tar sands oil trade.

Departments deliver this month as well: NOW has Editor Brad McKee’s perspective on the Rosa Barba Prize, updates on Changing Course, and elementary ag in NYC; Interview talks to Reid Fellenbaum, winner of the ASLA 2014 Student Award of Excellence in Analysis and Planning about his spooky-brilliant project, “Meridian of Fertility”; House Call features residential design in Arcadia National Park by Matthew Cunningham Landscape Architecture; and the Back has a portfolio of The Cultural Landscape Foundation‘s annual Landslide campaign, this year directed at saving site-specific artworks. All this and the usual rich offerings in Species, Goods, and Books. The full table of contents for November can be read here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating November articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: Gates Foundation, Tim Hursley; Pine Beetle, Paul Milner; Hunters Hole, Fred Phillips, ASLA; Guy Sternberg, Noppadol Paothong; Detroit, Detroit Future City; Alberta Refinery, Alex MacLean; Arturo Toscanini School, WORKac; Microtopographic Section Model, Reid Fellenbaum, Student Affiliate ASLA; Opus 40, © Thomas Hahn, 2014, Courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation.

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BY CONSTANCE CASEY

A little unkempt looking, the shagbark is one of the mightiest of North America's trees.

A little unkempt looking, the shagbark is one of the mightiest of North America’s trees.

From the October 2014 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

 One of the grandest North American trees is the shagbark hickory. It’s dramatic and easy to identify, with its smoke-gray bark warping away from the trunk. Grand, of course, implies big, and that’s part of the reason why the shagbark is not often planted and you wouldn’t see it in a nursery. It spreads itself in the woods from Quebec to Minnesota, south to Georgia and Texas, typically topping out at 70 to 90 feet with an irregular oval crown. It can grow to more than 100 feet, given 350 years or so.

The copper beech, with satiny bark, is British or Continental—Old World. The shagbark, to the essayist Donald Culross Peattie, is New World. “To everyone with a feeling for things American, and for American history, the shagbark seems like a symbol of the pioneer age,” he writes, “with its hard sinewy limbs and rude, shaggy coat, like the pioneer himself in fringed deerskin hunting shirt.”

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BY ELIZABETH PADJEN

Ramps for the 1,400 car garage are camouflaged by walls and plantings.

Ramps for the 1,400-car garage are camouflaged by walls and plantings.

From the October 2014 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

At 10:30 on a July morning, an east wind brings a damp chill off the harbor and gray clouds hang overhead like sodden hammocks. And still, people come to the park. They are everywhere—perched on walls, settled onto benches, hunched over tables outside the café. Some stare into space. Some check out the passersby. Many more peer at screens. It’s a perfect morning for a cozy cup of tea in the hotel across the street or coffee at a nearby Starbucks. That’s where you’d expect all these people to be. Not in a park.

But this is the Norman B. Leventhal Park—better known to Bostonians as Post Office Square or simply P.O. Square, and it is the recipient of ASLA’s 2014 Landmark Award, which honors projects finished between 15 and 50 years ago that have kept their original design integrity and make a major contribution to the civic realm. “The fact that it’s still there, intact, is important,” said one juror. “How many other parks that are 15 years old haven’t been renovated?” Another juror said: “It’s one of the best landscapes in our country, simply for what it did for the financial district. It allowed people to get outside and get some nature in the urban environment.”

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From the October 2014 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine:

Several faculty members at different schools recently have told me, unbidden, that remarkable numbers of their landscape architecture students want to find work that has a social impact, such as with a nonprofit or NGO group, after they graduate. To judge by this year’s run of ASLA Student Awards in this issue, it would seem they are having no trouble finding worlds of need. There is a playground designed and built for 350 children at an AIDS orphanage in South Africa, and a project for people in an informal settlement in Lima, Peru. There are two projects that directly benefit military veterans. Another considers the tangible ways people attach to a place as they grow old. And, of course, examples of ecological redemption abound. What I think we are seeing is a natural impulse to do good, compounded by a much greater awareness among young people today of the importance of community service, which is being ingrained in and required of them before they finish high school. Added to that are the signs of starker inequality, food scarcity, and climate volatility that are getting through to students and sticking with them.

In that regard, this issue, with the awards for students plus the ASLA Professional Awards and the Landmark Award, is all good news, which is why we look forward to doing it so much each year. This is our fourth year combining the student and professional awards in one rather mind-opening and deeply heartening package. There are 21 student winners chosen from 313 entries; 34 professional winners emerged from 596 entries. Seriously, if you need a lift as much of the world seems bent on coming unglued, read this magazine.

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