Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘LAM MAGAZINE’ Category

BY CRAIG PITTMAN

In inlet in the Persian Gulf, in Qatar's Khor Al-Adraid region. Courtesy National Park Service.

Inland Sea in the Persian Gulf, in Qatar’s Khor Al-Adaid region. Courtesy National Park Service.

From the April 2014 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

We Americans sometimes take our national parks for granted. After all, we’ve got 59 of them, and they’ve been around since 1872, when President Ulysses S. Grant signed the law creating the first one the world had ever seen, Yellowstone National Park. Other countries envy our parks, and some want American help in creating their own. That’s where the landscape architects of the National Park Service (NPS) step in. Through an office established in 1962, they have assisted Saudi Arabia, Costa Rica, Pakistan, and Japan, among other countries.

“Many countries around the world do look to the United States as a leader in park and protected area management,” says David Krewson of the NPS’s Office of International Affairs. “These kinds of projects also give us a chance to learn innovative practices from other countries’ park agencies.”

It’s not easy duty. Look what happened when Qatar asked for help with its Khor Al-Adaid area, also known as the Inland Sea. Inhabited by flocks of flamingos, hedgehogs, gerbils, ospreys, sand gazelles, and wild camels, the region was already attracting tourists enthralled by its towering dunes and dramatic rock outcroppings.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Bridgeport, CT. Courtesy of Rebuild by Design.

Bridgeport, CT. Courtesy of Rebuild by Design.

Back in November, we wrote about the early stages of the Rebuild by Design competition, just after the first teams of finalists presented their ideas to the public. The challenge, which is driven by the President’s Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force, will make substantial funding available for the winners from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as well as the private sector. We also reported on the Institute for Public Knowledge (“Backstage at Rebuild by Design,” November 2013,) the think tank that has helped shape the public discussions for the Rebuild Challenge.

Last week, the 10 finalist teams, BIG TEAM; HR&A Advisors, Inc. with Cooper, Robertson & Partners; Interboro Team; MIT CAU + ZUS + URBANISTEN;  OMA; PennDesign/OLIN; Sasaki/Rutgers/Arup;  SCAPE / Landscape Architecture; WB unabridged with Yale ARCADIS; and WXY/West 8, gathered to unveil the latest iteration of the designs in public meetings in New York and New Jersey. The teams have been collaborating with individual communities along the shoreline, and their proposals now reflect the input and specific conditions of particular places.

We weren’t able to get there in person, but you should read Justin Davidson’s write-up in New York magazine, accompanied by a handy slide show of the proposals, to see the latest work from the competition. HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan will announce the winning proposals later this spring.

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A modern landscape for a historic cemetery by Halvorson Design Partnership and HGA, the remaking of a major Parisian public square by TVK with Martha Schwartz Partners and Areal Landscape Architecture, and the long and winding road back to health for the L.A. River are all in the April issue of LAM. The Climate section looks at Buenos Aires’s flood problem; Now embraces landscape “failures” and reconsiders contaminated military sites; and in Palette, Bernard Trainor, ASLA, melds his native Australia with California natives in his planting designs. All this plus our regular features in Species, Books, and Goods

You can read the full table of contents for April or pick up a free digital issue of the April LAM here and share it with your clients. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also purchase single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options. Keep an eye on the LAM blog, Facebook page, and Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating some April pieces as the month rolls out—excellent accompaniments to a very welcome spring.

 
Credits: Lakewood Cemetery, © Paul Crosby; Place de la Republique, © Pierre-Yves Brunaud/Picturetank; Pistia, Peter Essick/Aurora Photos/Corbis; Landscape Fails, Niall Kirkwood, FASLA; Palette: Bernard Trainor, Jason Liske.

Read Full Post »


We are very honored to be finalists in 2014 American Magazine Awards for General Excellence in the Special Interest category, especially considering the excellent other magazines in the group: Modern Farmer, Los Angeles Magazine, Inc., and the Hollywood Reporter.

The whole point of remaking Landscape Architecture Magazine over the past four years has been to bring out of relative obscurity the huge range of the difficult and inventive work that landscape architects are doing to put our treatment of this planet on a better path. The work is happening at all scales. It happens around small creeks, gardens, town streets, and playgrounds on up to whole watersheds, transit systems, and shorelines.

Landscape architects are wise and dedicated people, and many of their best efforts come through in the ways they gather knowledge across a range of other arts and sciences and factor it in to the reality they know better than anyone: What land can and cannot sustain. The thinking is adventurous, and the stories are so good they practically tell themselves. They just need a home, and that’s what the whole LAM staff strives to give them. Of course, we could not do it without our loyal readers or the amazing support we have here at ASLA, which sees LAM as one of the numerous ways it can work to keep pushing  landscape architects to the front of the game in design and environmental stewardship.

 

Read Full Post »

BY ARTHUR ALLEN

At the Lawrence Berkeley National  Laboratory's cool pavement showcase, research associate Jordan Woods measures solar reflection levels with an albedometer. Credit Lawrence Berkeley National  Laboratory/Roy Kaltschmidt

At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s cool pavement showcase, research associate Jordan Woods measures solar reflection levels with an albedometer. Credit Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Roy Kaltschmidt.

From the March issue of LAM:

At the Greenbuild conference in Philadelphia in November, the National Asphalt Pavement Association booth featured a provocative report, packaged as a little booklet by three engineers at Arizona State University. The report concluded that, contrary to what federal scientists and green building promoters have been saying, light-colored roofs and pavements were not necessarily superior to dark-colored ones, environmentally speaking, and might even do more harm than good.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

"Work" by Alex Kwa from The Noun Project

Work by Alex Kwa from the Noun Project.

From the March issue of LAM:

For most of the past several years, there has not been much to say on the employment front for landscape architects, or for the design and construction industry in general, except that nobody was hiring. And that’s a very short story to tell. But by mid-February, there were definite signs of a steady upward trend in the hiring of landscape architects. Of course, this sort of thing must be said somewhat warily, so as not to jinx or overstate it, but designers themselves offer the proof.

In the first week of February, there were 80 jobs listed on ASLA’s JobLink site; 61 of them were placed in January (most are listings that stay up for 30 days). The last time listings ran this high was 2008; there were about 90 ads placed in both January and February of that year. And we all know what happened over the following several months as the housing market nearly brought down the entire financial system. In January of 2009, there were 14 ads placed; the January number stayed in that range through January 2013, when there were 22 ads.

The jobs listed recently have been diverse. A few public agencies are hiring, and so are design/build firms, landscape contracting companies, small design offices, and global multidisciplinary firms. The destination is no longer just China or bust; there are firms all over the country looking for new people.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Two very different, but very Berlin urban parks are featured in the new issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine. The former Templehof airport is now a beloved and highly desirable 900-acre open space. With multiple factions and agendas competing to decide its future,  GROSS.MAX landscape architects have some interesting moves to make.  Nearby, Park am Gleisdreieck, designed by Atelier Loidl, makes places to play while incorporating the  scars from World War II.  Back in Brooklyn, the Olmsted and Vaux-designed and Moses-altered  Prospect Park welcomes a new skate rink, Lakeside. The elegant design brings together the old and new, including a new structure by Williams/Tsien.  “I haven’t done extensive research on this,” says Prospect Park’s Christian Zimmerman, FASLA, “but I can’t think of another project in the country that implements such a massive, modern-designed structure, and does historic preservation, and does ecological restoration all in one in a landmark park.”

In the departments, Kevan Williams looks at  products for making barriers that serve as habitat along fragile coasts; Workstation offers a survey of how (and why) landscape architects might use 3-D printers,  and Climate looks at new strategies for coastal restoration around the San Francisco Bay. All this plus our regular features in Species, Books, Goods, and Now. You can read the full table of contents for March or pick up a  digital issue of the March  LAM here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes and Noble. You can also purchase single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye on the LAM blog, Facebook page,  and Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating some of the articles from  the  March issue as the month rolls out.

Credits: Lakeside/Prospect Park aerial,  Michael Moran/Otto;  Shadeworks, Matt Annabel, Associate ASLA; 3-D terrain model, Peter Summerlin, Associate ASLA; Gleisdreieck,  Atelier Loidl; Templehof master plan, Templehofer Freiheit; ReefBLK, Coastal Environments, Inc.; Cool pavements research, Lawrence Berkeley National  Laboratory/Roy Kaltschmidt; San Francisco Bay beach, Peter Baye.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 426 other followers

%d bloggers like this: