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Researchers will be paid an honorarium of $2500 if their work is accepted forthe LATIS series.  Credit: ASLA

Researchers will be paid an honorarium of $2,500 if their work is accepted for the LATIS series. Credit: ASLA.

Solid peer-reviewed research in new landscape practice areas is highly valuable and not always easy to find, and that’s why LATIS (Landscape Architecture Technical Information Series) is such a terrific resource.

LATIS papers provide practicing landscape architects with peer-reviewed technical information about new and evolving practices and products and offer an economical way to earn the professional development hours (PDH) needed to meet state licensure requirements. This work is important to the growth of the field, and the production and distribution of this new research is supported by the ASLA Fund with $2,500 honoraria for accepted papers and free access to LATIS papers for ASLA members (a $50 fee applies for nonmembers). The papers are accompanied by a 10- to 15-question test you give yourself, through which practitioners can earn LA CES approved PDH for an additional fee.

If you are pioneering a new practice area or are successfully using an innovative technique, publicizing your work through LATIS will help increase the fluency in new and developing topics within landscape architecture. Authors of all papers are carefully selected by ASLA, and all papers are subject to a blind review process. ASLA is now accepting proposals for the 2015–2016 LATIS cycle, and accepted LATIS authors will be offered honoraria of $2,500 for their work.

If you’re interested, email Shawn Balon, ASLA, the Professional Practice Manager, at sbalon@asla.org for additional information. Responses to the LATIS Call for Abstracts must be received by COB on Friday, August 14, 2015, to be considered for the 2015–2016 LATIS publications.

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In August’s issue of LAM, Philip Walsh finds that landscape architects could work harder than they do to restore lost wetlands in the United States. Steven Litt, in Cleveland, reports on how Perk Park, an acre of oasis downtown, by Thomas Balsley Associates, is making the city look harder at the value of well-designed open space. And in Washington, D.C., Bradford McKee checks out the new national headquarters of the U.S. Coast Guard with two dozen acres of green roofs and gardens by Andropogon and HOK.

In the departments, the Harvard Graduate School of Design appoints Anita Berrizbeitia, ASLA, as the chair of landscape architecture and Diane Davis as the chair of urban planning; a look at the watchdogs who track down plant growers who infringe on someone else’s patents; and the winners of the Boston Living with Water Competition aimed at envisioning a resilient city come sea-level rise. All this plus our regular Now, Species, Goods, and Books columns. The full table of contents for August can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating August articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “The Return of the Swamp,” Lisa Cowan, ASLA/StudioVerde; “Freeze, Thaw, Flourish,” © Scott Pease/Pease Photography, 2012; “The Wetter, the Better,” Judy Davis/Hoachlander Davis Photography; “New Chairs, Subtle Shifts,” Courtesy Harvard Graduate School of Design; “Plant Sheriff,” Courtesy Bailey Nurseries; “Boston from the Ground Floor,” Designed by Architerra; Courtesy Boston Living With Water.

LAMCASTJULY

Drones aren’t all bad, and in an interview with Yale Environment 360, Thomas Lennon, director of this two-minute video of awe-inspiring nature shots of the Delaware River watershed, explains the limitless possibilities drones provide over traditional aerial photography from helicopters. But the potential stretches further than nature videos and becomes a useful tool for environmentalists and artists alike, setting it apart as an aid rather than the controversial weapon the term “drone” is most often associated with. For the two-minute video and interview, click here or the picture above.

THE GLOBAL CUCUMBER

BY TIM WATERMAN

The Milan Expo 2015 raises unsought emotions about food, cities, the world.

The Milan Expo 2015 raises unsought emotions about food, cities, the world.

From the July 2015 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

A city like Milan reflects the strivings of generations. It has a rich quality of everyday life that includes a sophisticated food culture, which, as in so many Italian cities, is both distinctly local and, because of its history of trade, cosmopolitan. The evolution of the city’s form has intertwined with the tastes and appetites of the Milanese. The convivial quality of many of its spaces comes from enclosures such as its ubiquitous courtyard gardens, its cool semiprivate zones where neighbors come into contact, or its sidewalk cafés. Milan was once Mediolanum (meaning “in the midst of the plain”), the capital of the Western Roman Empire. It was enclosed by walls, but open to its countryside in the Po River Valley, where alluvial soils raised abundant grain and grapes, and roads brought influence from all over Europe.

Milan’s economy has suffered, as has all of Italy’s, from the crash in 2008, and recession and unemployment are tenaciously rooted. While its economy continues to be underpinned by industry and agriculture, notably by small, family-owned farms, government policy has looked to urban and infrastructural development for solutions to the crisis. Italy’s new, post-Berlusconi government is trying to show evidence of its ability to deliver, and Milan, the financial center of Italy, has become a showcase of contemporary neoliberal development. In particular, two developments have shown great international visibility: the Milan Expo 2015 and the business district at Porta Nuova, best known for the Bosco Verticale (vertical forest), the heavily vegetated and much-published twin luxury apartment towers by the architect Stefano Boeri.

Boeri has courted controversy at both sites, attracting antigentrification protests both from the working-class neighborhood the towers protrude from, as well as accusations of deploying expensive greenwash that would never be possible in a lower-cost development. Much the same objections have been raised against the plans for this year’s expo in Milan, which he master planned with Jacques Herzog, William McDonough, and Ricky Burdett. “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life” is the expo’s motto, meant, as it was, to embody a sustainable ethic, but it clashed with the presence of food giants such as McDonald’s and Coca-Cola among the nations represented. Lavish spending on the project further excited anger, as many people questioned the concentration of municipal spending on one site instead of many, and the inevitable siphoning away of funds that such concentration engenders. On May Day in Milan, cars blazed in the streets, windows were smashed, and ‘No Expo’ graffiti proliferated.

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DredgeFest_GreatLakes_Flyer-02 If you missed DredgeFestNYC and DredgeFest Louisiana (see “The Dredge Underground,” LAM, August 2014) then you haven’t experienced one of the most interesting landscape-focused gatherings around. Fortunately, another chance is just ahead at DredgeFest Great Lakes (DFGL) this August. DredgeFest draws a friendly and curious crowd across a wide spectrum of expertise to look critically at dredging and the land it winds up making—and there are many overlaps with contemporary landscape architecture practice.

This event (conference doesn’t really describe it) will focus on the Great Lakes region (aka the Third Coast in dredgespeak). It will include two days of talks and presentations from a range of designers and others who work in this industrial practice; a day of touring dredge sites around Duluth; and a weeklong workshop at the University of Minnesota’s School of Architecture and Department of Landscape Architecture that brings in a very intriguing international cohort of designers.

This third iteration of DredgeFest should be the best yet, with the now-signature mix of intense investigations and industrial monumentality with the speculative edge that has marked previous DredgeFests.

Landscape Architecture Magazine is a cosponsor of DFGL this year. We’re looking forward to inhaling the fascinating new research and meeting folks in Minnesota this August. Registration for one or all parts of DFGL is open now.

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

xxx. Credit: xxx

A recycled mural of larger-than-life fish swimming along a platform in Lisbon. Credit: Bordalo II.

From “Big Trash Art” by Katarina Katsma, ASLA, in the July 2015 issue, featuring Lisbon-based artist Bordalo II and his recycled murals that call attention to the detrimental effects of humanity’s waste.

“I love the texture in the artwork and the texture created by the artwork in its surroundings.”

—Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

You can read the full table of contents for July 2015 or pick up a free digital issue of the July LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

IMG_7846 In a profession as diverse as landscape architecture, it can be hard to get a sense of how the profession is performing as a whole. So each quarter, ASLA sends out its Business Quarterly Survey to a wide variety of firm types to get a snapshot of the profession’s health. The survey helps measure activity in firms’ billable hours, inquiries for new work, and hiring.

For the second quarter of this year, about 86 percent of firms reported stable to significantly higher billable hours over the previous quarter, which is slightly better than reported for the same quarter of 2014. About 84 percent said inquiries for new work were stable to significantly higher in quarter two. Slightly fewer than half (48 percent) said they plan to hire in the coming quarter; during the first quarter, the figure was 62 percent.

The survey also asked firms about their recruiting approaches and the use of social media. Although nearly 42 percent of respondents said they use social media in recruiting, only 16 percent said they think a potential job candidate should have strong social media skills.

For the full news release and highlights from the 2015 second quarter BQS, visit ASLA’s website here.

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