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NEW AT HQ: ASLA IS MOVING!

stair-cross-section

The redesign will open the stairwell for better light circulation. Credit: Gensler.

For the next eight months or so, the ASLA national headquarters building, located in the heart of Chinatown in Washington, D.C., will undergo renovations to transform its outdated interior into the new ASLA Center for Landscape Architecture. The society sees the renovations, designed by D.C.-based Gensler, as an opportunity to fully represent the “image and ethic of its great profession.” The ASLA staff is eager to see the sunlight-filled space and a vast, open-floor layout for conferences and events.

Starting December 16, ASLA will be temporarily relocated to 601 13th Street NW in Washington, D.C., while renovations take place. All staff phone and emails will remain the same, and any mail addressed to ASLA should continue to be sent to 636 I Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20001.

While all of ASLA’s many services will be available during this time, ASLA’s library and archival collection will be temporarily unavailable, including all awards materials, membership handbooks, past LAM issues, and Fellows files. However, Brooke Hinrichs, ASLA’s Research/Collections Analyst, will still be able to access the Fellows database and conduct searches for magazine citations. For more information or library contact info, please visit here.

For more information on the new ASLA Center for Landscape Architecture, please visit here.

GET REAL

BY BRIAN BARTH

Virtual Reality is making a leap:

Virtual Reality is making a leap. Will landscape architects be ready?

From the December 2015 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Early next year, Oculus—a company recently purchased by Facebook from its founder Palmer Luckey for $2.3 billion—is expected to release Rift, the first mass-produced virtual reality headset. With a price tag around $300 to $400, the Oculus Rift will allow video gaming enthusiasts to slay each other in an immersive, true-to-scale, viscerally realistic three-dimensional world—a world where gamers on any continent can join each other inside their goggles.

Gaming junkies are far from the only crowd salivating for access to the technology. The software industry is falling over itself to produce new web and media applications for the Oculus Rift, ranging from immersive 3-D movies (think IMAX inside a pair of ski goggles) to tutorials on how to properly dissect a human cadaver to combat simulations for the military. At its core, virtual reality (VR) is an advanced way to experience a 3-D model of anything a designer can come up with; naturally, architects, engineers, and landscape architects are also standing in line for a chance to plug their designs into the new technology.

Computer engineers have been chasing the idea of VR since Continue Reading »

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Credit: Snohetta_Mayer-Reed_Dialog

Credit: Snøhetta, Mayer/Reed, DIALOG.

From “Don’t Call It a Plan” by Timothy A. Schuler, in the December 2015 issue, featuring designs for the reopening of Willamette Falls in Oregon by Snøhetta, Mayer/Reed, and DIALOG.

“Successfully combining photography and illustration gives a sense of place. I can hear the echo of the roar of the falls in the distance.”

—Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

Pick up a free digital issue of the December LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

DECEMBER’S CHILL

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In December’s  LAM, Fred Bernstein reports on Daniel Biederman’s quest for the perfect park, and it’s not for slouches. Jonathan Lerner writes about the simple beauty of the Cedar Creek Residence by Hocker Design Group, winner of the 2015 ASLA Professional Award of Excellence in Residential Design. William Saunders takes in OLIN’s rewilding of Mill River in the heart of Stamford, Connecticut.

In Interview, Kurt Fristrup, a senior scientist for the National Park Service’s Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division, discusses newly released “sound maps” of the United States; what virtual reality could mean for landscape architecture in Tech; and in Ecology, Norman DeFraeye, the supervisor for Toronto’s ravine and natural feature protection, walks a tough line for nature restoration in the middle of an urban center. And don’t miss our regular Now, Species, Goods, and Books columns.

You can read the full table of contents for December 2015 or pick up a free digital issue of the December LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating December articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Pardon His Progress,” Patrick Pantano; “The Serenity of Straight Lines,” Robert Yu; “Change the Channel,” © OLIN/Sahar Coston-Hardy; “Field Recordings,” National Park Service; “Get Real,” Dan Neubauer; “The Ravine Keeper,” DTAH.

THE CONNECTOR

BY ADAM REGN ARVIDSON, FASLA

Diane Jones Allen works to put public spaces and neighborhoods back together in post-Katrina New Orleans.

Diane Jones Allen works to put public spaces and neighborhoods back together in post-Katrina New Orleans.

From the November 2015 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

In the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans, at a community garden baking in the March sun, some herbs struggle up out of cinder block planters, and irrigation lines snake through the beds, which are awaiting springtime seeds. On the side of a toolshed is a big chalkboard announcing an evening movie screening and other community events. In the shade of a wooden arbor, Diane Jones Allen, ASLA, is meeting with Jenga Mwendo, the director of the Backyard Gardeners Network, which runs the garden. They are discussing not this place, the Guerrilla Garden, but the vacant city block across the street. Mwendo wants to claim it as community space, and Jones Allen is helping her envision what that might look like.

Jones Allen starts up her laptop on the wooden picnic table and presents a few sketches: plastic crates repurposed as small gardens, movable tables on a gravel bed, a pile of tires as a play area. That last idea intrigues Mwendo. “I just came across a pile of tires,” she says. “I’m just trying to remember where I saw that. There are lots of tires in this neighborhood.” She says she could probably make that happen right away, and it would offer some more options for Kids’ Club, an after-school program at the Guerrilla Garden. As Jones Allen presents her ideas, Continue Reading »

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Slide Crater at Maggie Daley Park features multiple slide options for children 5 to 12 years old. Credit: Alex MacLean.

Slide Crater at Maggie Daley Park features multiple slide options for children 5 to 12 years old. Credit: Alex MacLean.

From “We Got Fun. And Foam.” by Timothy A. Schuler, in the November 2015 issue, featuring Maggie Daley Park, Chicago’s newest addition to lakeside Grant Park.

“Maggie Daley Park is like a fantasyland of colors and shapes. It’s like staring into an aquarium!”

—Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

 

Since 2010, the National Capital Planning Commission in Washington, D.C., has played host to a speaker series that touches on a wide range of planning issues. One of its most recent lectures was Nature in the City | The City in Nature, featuring Douglas Meffert, the executive director of Audubon Louisiana, and Beth White, the director of the Trust for Public Land’s Chicago office, who each described the opportunities opened to these two cities by introducing active living infrastructure. For more information, please click here.

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