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Archive for the ‘ART’ Category

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Look at that cover. It’s a Millicent Harvey photograph of the Clark Art Institute, a design by Reed Hilderbrand Landscape Architecture. The project that took more than a decade. You can tell. In any case, Jennifer Reut tells us. Also this month, Anne Raver reports on a campaign to save farms in the Hudson River Valley, which supply many lives in New York City with fresh food. In Boston, Elizabeth Padjen surveys the Lawn on D, a provisional park by Sasaki that has become a sensation. And don’t miss our Now, Interview, Tech, and Goods columns.

You can read the full table of contents for December 2016 or pick up a free digital issue of the December LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating December articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “A Foodshed Moment,” Frederick Charles; “Call and Response,” Millicent Harvey; “Playdate on D Street,” Sahar Coston-Hardy; “Angles Entangled,” Benjamin Benschneider; “Living on Air,” Courtesy Brandon Cornejo, Student ASLA; “Expanded Horizons,” Sky High Creative Media for Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects; “Soul to Souls,” Jeremy Bittermann.

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As part of Philadelphia’s celebrated Mural Arts program, the German artist Katharina Grosse was invited to paint an episodic series of painted landscapes and buildings along the busy Northeast Corridor rail lines. The resulting composition, called psychylustro, splashes warm clouds of neon graffiti on decaying buildings and hardscrabble landscapes, implicitly calling attention to the conditions and context for this kind of postindustrial decay, even as viewers zoom by in an Amtrak train. “It’s about an astonishing encounter with painting,” Grosse says.

 

Editor’s note: This post originally referred to the site as a “disused” rail corridor. It has been updated to reflect that it is located along the very active Northeast Corridor.

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On Monday, the Aga Khan Foundation announced its 2016 awards for architecture, honoring six projects from a short list of 19 named as semifinalists in May. The award honors architecture of the Islamic world every three years. Among the projects is the Superkilen (“Super Wedge”) park in Copenhagen, designed by Bjarke Ingels Group, Topotek 1, and Superflex. In its award announcement, the jury (which included Suad Amiry,  Emre Arolat, Akeel Bilgrami, Luis Fernàndez-Galiano, Hameed Haroon, Lesley Lokko, Mohsen Mostafavi, Dominique Perrault, and Hossein Rezai), cited Superkilen’s ability to integrate disparate ethnicities, religions, and cultures in a vibrant public space. LAM featured the project on its cover in July 2013. Following is our story on the park.

BY JESSICA BRIDGER

In Copenhagen, Superkilen rolls out a half-mile mash-up of global culture.

In Copenhagen, Superkilen rolls out a half-mile mash-up of global culture.

From the July 2013 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

A neighborhood at the margins of the mainstream and beset by the problems of poverty: Arriving at Nørrebro Station is a bit of a shock for anyone who’s been in central Copenhagen’s pristine fairy tale. From Tivoli, the city’s famed historical amusement park, to the perfectly maintained metro stations that still look brand new years after construction, a perfect urbanism seems to be the project here. Yet Nørrebro Station is completely covered in graffiti. The layers of paint obscure the windows, something more out of New York City in the 1970s or present-day Detroit. The streetscape in Nørrebro is less shocking and perhaps looks more like central Copenhagen, just a little more down at the heel. After all, this Scandinavian country has a robust social support network and provides housing, health care, and basic subsistence to all its residents.

Yet graffiti in a train station is a maintenance issue, and, stewardship notwithstanding, efforts are made citywide to improve the city fabric, the quality of life in urban public space. That perhaps Nørrebro has more room for improvement is unsurprising, and in recognition of this the city has (more…)

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Credit: MIR for Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects.

Credit: MIR for Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects.

A rendering from the ASLA 2016 Analysis & Planning Professional Honor Award winner “Memorial Park Master Plan 2015” by Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects in the September 2016 issue, featuring the reworking and restoration of Memorial Park in Houston.

“Morning fog, photorealistic edition.”

—Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

You can read the full table of contents for September 2016 or pick up a free digital issue of the September LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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BY ADAM MANDELMAN

cleaning up after the burning man festival is serious business.

Cleaning up after the Burning Man festival is serious business.

From the August 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Every year, in the weeks leading up to Labor Day, a temporary metropolis emerges from the barren alkali flats of Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. Meticulously surveyed, the concentric circles and spokes of Black Rock City’s dusty streets fan out across some seven square miles of dry lake bed (or “playa”), providing an iconic geography for one of North America’s more bizarre annual rituals: Burning Man.

But the chaotic arts and music festival, known for its high hedonism, is as much an exercise in evanescent urban planning as it is a radical social experiment. Come Labor Day, Burning Man’s deeply ingrained leave-no-trace ethos takes over. Attendees pack up gear, artists break down installations, and theme camps dismantle projects so elaborate that (more…)

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Iconic projects and designers are in the spotlight in July’s issue of LAM. Eight years after opening, the Rose Kennedy Greenway—housed over a sunken highway in the middle of downtown Boston—has become a treasured spot for tourists and locals alike. The new Mosholu driving range in the Bronx, designed by Ken Smith Workshop, sits atop one of New York’s largest public works project, the Croton Water Filtration Plant. Anthony Acciavatti, the author of the new book Ganges Water Machine: Designing New India’s Ancient River, discusses the history and influence of India’s sacred river. And plans, drawings, and paintings by the famed Brazilian landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx are celebrated for their artistic value at the Jewish Museum in New York.

In the departments, Interview brings together two authors to discuss their books on wild landscape design, then computational logic and coding pave new avenues for landscape architectural practice in Tech. And don’t miss our regular Now, Species, Goods, and Books columns. The full table of contents for July can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating July articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “The Big Sprig,” Sahar Coston-Hardy; “Driving Concern,” Alex S. MacLean/Landslides Aerial Photography; “A Course in Change,” Anthony Acciavatti; “Where Roberto Burle Marx Belongs,” © Tyba; “Wild Times,” Charles Steck; “Follow the Script,” Responsive Environments and Artifacts Lab/Bradley Cantrell, ASLA; Justine Holzman, Associate ASLA; Leif Estrada.

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Osteria ai Pioppi is an unusual ecological amusement park in a small community north of Venice, Italy. There Bruno Ferrin handcrafted fantastical rides with metal and other odd materials that are all kinetically driven, allowing children to learn while engaging with the rides. Ferrin has been adding new creations—which he says are all inspired by nature—since 1969. This two-minute video is presented by the Great Big Story, a video network featuring unusual and awe-inspiring places around the world. For more information and videos, please visit here.

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