Category Archives: Climate

Where the Water Was

In West Philadelphia, Anne Whiston Spirn’s Work Goes Deep.

By Anne Raver
Photography by Sahar Coston-Hardy, Affiliate ASLA

We were driving around west Philadelphia when Anne Whiston Spirn, FASLA, stopped at the corner of Walnut and 43rd Streets to recall the moment of discovery that still drives her work. Continue reading Where the Water Was

The Rising Tidewater

Disparate but urgent efforts to address sea-level rise in the Virginia Tidewater, one of the country’s most important strategic centers, are striving to keep up with visible realities.

By Brett Anderson / Photography by Sahar Coston-Hardy

A green infrastructure retrofit along Knitting Mill Creek in Norfolk. Photo by Sahar Coston-Hardy.

The first question that sprang to Ann C. Phillips’s mind soon after she moved to Norfolk, Virginia, in 2006 was, “Why, when it rains, does the whole place submerge?” Continue reading The Rising Tidewater

Richard Weller’s Audit for the End-Times

A look at the end of the world entails a new mission for landscape designers.

By Zach Mortice 

The world’s protected areas. Currently around 15 percent of the earth’s terrestrial surface is protected. The United Nations target is to reach 17 percent by 2020. © 2017 Richard J. Weller, Claire Hoch, and Chieh Huang, Atlas for the End of the World.

Within the hundreds of maps Richard Weller, ASLA, assembled for his Atlas for the End of the World, there’s an implicit argument for something like a new mandate for landscape architecture: Instead of mostly planning the development of public outdoor spaces in developed and affluent cities, it’s time for landscape designers to mediate the battles between rapidly expanding developing-world cities and the irreplaceable biodiversity they’re consuming. It’s a task that increases landscape architects’ zones of influence from the scale of city blocks to hundreds of square miles. Continue reading Richard Weller’s Audit for the End-Times

Martha Schwartz, Reconnecting

Back from a dozen years in London, the designer is focusing on climate and the world she has made her home.

By James Trulove

 Photo by Sahar Coston-Hardy.

Martha Schwartz, FASLA, and her business partner and husband, Markus Jatsch, last year relocated from London to Brooklyn, though the London office remains the headquarters of their firm, Martha Schwartz Partners. Continue reading Martha Schwartz, Reconnecting

Have Tree, Will Travel

Some imperiled plants need help moving to places where they can thrive.

By Kevan Williams

A torreya sapling growing in North Carolina and a photograph of its parent tree.
A torreya sapling growing in North Carolina and a photograph of its parent tree.

For more than 200 years, naturalists and plant enthusiasts have come to the woods along the Altamaha River in south Georgia, searching for a horticultural holy grail: a wild Franklinia alatamaha, William Bartram’s “lost camellia.” Continue reading Have Tree, Will Travel

Rotterdam’s Boundless Biennale

Urban by Nature puts a spotlight on landscape architecture’s role in the Anthropocene.

By Jessica Bridger 

Visitors roam the Urban by Nature exhibits on opening day.

The landscape architect Dirk Sijmons wants to make a double point with the name of “his” biennale—the 6th International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam (IABR)—which opened in late May. Continue reading Rotterdam’s Boundless Biennale