Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘CONSTRUCTION’ Category

BY BRAULIO AGNESE

lam_02feb2017_capitolcrossingopeningspread_resize

After four decades, a prominent reminder of the effects of urban renewal in the nation’s capital is set to vanish.

FROM THE FEBRUARY 2017 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

All cities bear scars, evidence of past planning decisions, made with the best of intentions, that affect urban space in negative ways over the following decades. For more than 40 years, Washington, D.C.’s northwest quadrant has suffered a particularly prominent one where the District’s downtown meets the Capitol Hill neighborhood to the east: A three-block-long, 200-foot-wide opening above the depressed Center Leg Freeway (I-395), which runs beneath the nation’s capital from New York Avenue down to the Southeast Freeway (I-695).

The opening—bounded by Massachusetts Avenue to the north, E Street to the south, 2nd Street on the east, and a handful of buildings along 3rd Street—is a remnant of the nationwide mid-20th-century effort to revitalize cities by bringing high-speed, multilane highways around and through urban cores. Extensive plans for the District included an interstate loop within the city that would stretch from the west end of the National Mall to the Anacostia River on the east. The eight-lane Center Leg Freeway, which skirts along the U.S. Capitol’s west side, was the second segment built.

North of Constitution Avenue, the section of D.C. the freeway would pass through was a largely black and mixed-European working-class neighborhood that had been in long decline as the city suffered from white flight and economic woes. (Partly in response to the District’s difficulties, a complete reorganization of local government in 1967 gave D.C. semiautonomous rule with its first mayor and City Council.) The area was considered blighted, and there was little effort to resist the project. But seven years after construction on the Center Leg Freeway began, (more…)

Read Full Post »

BY ALEX ULAM

lam_02feb2017_hudsonyards-openingspread_resize

Nelson Byrd Woltz gets super technical at Hudson Yards.

FROM THE FEBRUARY 2017 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

Until recently, you wouldn’t have wanted to go strolling at any time of the day near Hudson Yards, the two gigantic superblocks located on the far West Side of Midtown Manhattan. There was little street life there and almost no nature. Barbed-wire fences and concrete walls lined the streets and concealed the large, sooty pits packed with commuter and Amtrak trains. Indeed, everything about the place was man-made, even the hilly landscape surrounding the train yards below. Walking around was disorienting because the walls cut off view corridors and limited access to Midtown Manhattan and the adjacent Hudson River Park.

Now this formerly desolate expanse is being transformed by a $25 billion private real estate development, which the Related Companies, the project’s developer, is touting as the largest private build-out in the United States and the biggest in New York City since Rockefeller Center. In place of two gaping holes in the city’s fabric, there will be a 28-acre neighborhood with offices, apartments, and more than 100 stores and restaurants. In a sense, this development, where a projected 125,000 people will live and work, (more…)

Read Full Post »

BY ZACH MORTICE

The finished and installed concrete cistern. Image courtesy of Concreteworks.

The finished and installed concrete cistern. Image courtesy of Concreteworks.

Hired to design the atrium courtyard of a San Francisco spec office building that features a canted glass roof that channels rainwater, David Meyer of Meyer + Silberberg Land Architects got a few simple instructions from the building’s architects at Pfau Long Architecture—the most interesting of which was to “do something with the water” that the roof would corral into a cascading stream, dripping into the atrium.

But that simple request kicked off a high-wire adventure that saw a three-ton concrete rainwater cistern installed in the courtyard, pushing concrete fabricators to their limits.

Meyer turned to the specialty concrete fabrication firm Concreteworks to manufacture the cistern at 270 Brannan, built by developers SKS. Meyer’s most important request? The cistern had to be one continuous piece. After delays from the general contractor, Meyer says, (more…)

Read Full Post »

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Image courtesy of California American Water.

Image courtesy of California American Water.

From “River Reroute” by Lisa Owens Viani in the November 2016 issue; a look at Rana Creek Design’s plans to swap a riverbed for a parallel-running creek so that sediment can be removed from a dam nearing the end of its useful life.

“Busy beavers. . .”

–Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Read Full Post »

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Iconic projects and designers are in the spotlight in July’s issue of LAM. Eight years after opening, the Rose Kennedy Greenway—housed over a sunken highway in the middle of downtown Boston—has become a treasured spot for tourists and locals alike. The new Mosholu driving range in the Bronx, designed by Ken Smith Workshop, sits atop one of New York’s largest public works project, the Croton Water Filtration Plant. Anthony Acciavatti, the author of the new book Ganges Water Machine: Designing New India’s Ancient River, discusses the history and influence of India’s sacred river. And plans, drawings, and paintings by the famed Brazilian landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx are celebrated for their artistic value at the Jewish Museum in New York.

In the departments, Interview brings together two authors to discuss their books on wild landscape design, then computational logic and coding pave new avenues for landscape architectural practice in Tech. And don’t miss our regular Now, Species, Goods, and Books columns. The full table of contents for July can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating July articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “The Big Sprig,” Sahar Coston-Hardy; “Driving Concern,” Alex S. MacLean/Landslides Aerial Photography; “A Course in Change,” Anthony Acciavatti; “Where Roberto Burle Marx Belongs,” © Tyba; “Wild Times,” Charles Steck; “Follow the Script,” Responsive Environments and Artifacts Lab/Bradley Cantrell, ASLA; Justine Holzman, Associate ASLA; Leif Estrada.

Read Full Post »

 

Osteria ai Pioppi is an unusual ecological amusement park in a small community north of Venice, Italy. There Bruno Ferrin handcrafted fantastical rides with metal and other odd materials that are all kinetically driven, allowing children to learn while engaging with the rides. Ferrin has been adding new creations—which he says are all inspired by nature—since 1969. This two-minute video is presented by the Great Big Story, a video network featuring unusual and awe-inspiring places around the world. For more information and videos, please visit here.

Read Full Post »

 

The demolition of the interior of ASLA’s headquarters has finally gotten under way, marking a major first step in creating the ASLA Center for Landscape Architecture in the heart of Washington, D.C. Members of ASLA’s executive committee and staff joined in knocking down the first wall, with President Chad Danos, FASLA, taking the inaugural first swing. Demolition continues until late March when construction will begin.

The renovation, designed by Gensler and Oehme, van Sweden, is expected to continue through late summer. Pledges contributing to the project have reached 66 percent of the $1.5 million goal, and continue to grow through the generosity of members and many other friends of the Society. For more information, and to donate, visit cla.asla.org.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »