Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘LAM ONLINE’ Category

BY ZACH MORTICE

Joshua Tree National Park in California, where the park’s signature Joshua trees are threatened by climate change. Photo by Zach Mortice.

The national parks advocacy nonprofit—created by the federal government—is pushing back against the new administration on all fronts.

In the months since Donald Trump’s election, the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA), a nonprofit parks advocacy group, has taken aim at oil and gas drilling bills and rule changes from Republican majorities in Congress, draconian budget cut proposals from the White House, and a host of Trump-appointed agency administrators who’ll affect the health of the national park system. It’s even addressed the coarsening public rhetoric around basic civil rights granted to American citizens. These are all issues Theresa Pierno, NPCA’s president and CEO, sees as under assault by a cast of characters including climate-change deniers, pollution bystanders, and resource-extraction enthusiasts. All are newly empowered with Trump in the White House.

There’s a bill in Congress to ease rules that limit drilling for oil, gas, and minerals in national parks. And this month, LAM editor Brad McKee wrote about revisions to the Department of the Interior’s stream protection rules that make it easier for companies to dump mining waste into streams and waterways. The NPCA has opposed all of these moves.

When the Trump administration ordered the Department of the Interior (DOI), the parent agency of the National Park Service (NPS), to stop tweeting (more…)

Read Full Post »

Landscape Architecture Magazine (LAM), the journal of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), seeks a paid summer intern to produce a new online publication. The internship is full-time (8:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m.) Monday through Friday for 10 weeks, from June 5 through August 11, 2017 (start/end date flexible). Candidates are required to be on site in the Washington, D.C., office for this internship.

Responsibilities:

The intern will be the primary editor for a new online publication derived from previously published Landscape Architecture Magazine content.

  • Reviewing the magazine to create a keyword-searchable index of articles from the past five years.
  • Using the index to identify previously published content related to climate change.
  • Working with editorial staff to select images and text and prepare for web publication.
  • Publishing the selected content in a stand-alone web interface that can be easily updated.
  • Learning about all aspects of the monthly production of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Requirements:

  • Current enrollment in a bachelor’s or master’s program in landscape architecture or journalism. A strong understanding of landscape architecture, urban design, ecology, infrastructure, and related fields is necessary.
  • Excellent writing skills with a demonstrated interest in journalism or communications.
  • Working knowledge of InDesign (or similar) and Photoshop to prepare images for web publication.

How to Apply:

Please send cover letter, CV, two writing samples (no more than two pages each), and two references with LAM INTERN in the the subject line to mzackowitz@asla.org by end of day on Friday, April 7.

Phone interviews will be conducted with finalists and a selection will be made by the end of April.

The 10-week internship provides a $4,000 stipend, paid out (every two weeks) over the course of the internship. ASLA can also work with the intern to attain academic credit for the internship. Housing and travel costs are not included and not covered by ASLA.

The internship is an in-house position at ASLA’s national headquarters, which is conveniently located in downtown Washington, D.C., one block north of the Gallery Place/Chinatown Metro Station on the Red, Yellow, and Green Lines. Learn more about ASLA’s Center for Landscape Architecture.

Read Full Post »

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM. 

chicagoriverwalk_0369-cpp-9733_resize

Photo by Christian Phillips Photography.

From “Walking the Walk” by Jane Margolies in the March 2017 issue, a feature on Chicago’s six-block riverwalk, a decade and a half in the making.

“Down by the river.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Read Full Post »

Sasaki Principal Gina Ford’s prescriptions for landscape architecture’s future are a succinct set of progressive values: diversity, equity, and collaboration. At her Landscape Architecture Foundation presentation titled “Into an Era of Landscape Humanism,” the designer of the Chicago Riverwalk outlines how landscape architects have to reflect the diversity of the growing populations they serve in order to meet clients’ needs, design in ways that address historic gaps in access to restorative landscapes, and collaborate across professional boundaries to knit together holistic and healthy environments. It’s a definition of landscape design that begins with human needs and social realities, and lets landscape architects’ unique and critical talents flow into the world from there.

Read Full Post »

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM. 

now_wormtrails-img_7150_resize

Image courtesy of Roxi Thoren.

From “Living Lessons” by Victoria Solan in the March 2017 issue, on student investigations into how animals design their own environments.

“Earthworm art.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Read Full Post »

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM. 

Office of James Burnett

Image courtesy of Marion Brenner, Affiliate ASLA.

From “The Lid Comes On,” by Jonathan Lerner from the February 2017 issue, on Dallas’s freeway-capping Klyde Warren Park.

“Highway underpass.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Read Full Post »

By Zach Mortice

demolition_of_rockwell_gardens_resize

The Rockwell Gardens public housing project in Chicago, demolished in 2006. Photo by Paul Goyette.

The founders of the Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU) started off with a bang. The small but influential cadre of advocates for walkable and traditional-looking urbanism began meeting in 1993—the first big gathering was held at the historic Lyceum in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia, with its “enormous entablature,” as the historian Vincent Scully noted in his opening remarks. The CNU’s beginnings dovetailed with the passage of a piece of legislation that enshrined the group’s approach to city building as federal policy: the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s HOPE VI program. After decades of crumbling, dysfunctional government-built-and-managed public housing projects, housing would instead be at least partially constructed and controlled by private developers and management companies. They would build lower-density, “mixed-income” communities of row houses and garden apartments. By the numbers, the lower density was made easier because Congress, in 1995, ended what had long been the “one-for-one” replacement rule for any public housing to be demolished. Housing vouchers, to be used to pay private landlords (who are not required to accept them), were considered sufficient for tenants not accepted into newly built units. At any rate, the policy change posed no obstacle to architects and planners.

But the 2016 election of Donald Trump was a tidal wave that washes over every corner of government—public housing design guidelines and funding policy included. HUD and the New Urbanists’ HOPE VI legacy is, pending a likely confirmation, in the hands of Ben Carson, a retired neurosurgeon and GOP presidential primary candidate, who is neither an expert nor even a novice (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »