Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘MAINTENANCE’ Category

BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

In Chicago, an urban farm muscles in on an award-winning landscape.

In Chicago, an urban farm muscles in on an award-winning landscape.

From the May 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Not long after the landscape went in, the farm began encroaching. The black-eyed Susans were replaced by herbs. The shining sumac and Indiangrass were dug up to make way for chickens. And a copse of Skyrocket oaks, which screened the residential building’s parking lot from a traffic-choked section of Chicago’s Ogden Avenue, was next on the chopping block.

Mimi McKay, ASLA, the landscape architect for the project, known as Harvest Commons, got a call from Dave Snyder, the staff gardener. “Dave said that he was gonna build a chicken run and that he was gonna remove the oak trees to do it, and I had an absolute cow,” McKay recalls. “I said, ‘You absolutely cannot remove them—and you don’t have to remove them.’”

McKay, the principal at McKay Landscape Architects in Chicago, saved the oaks, but other landscape elements—elements that played a significant role in (more…)

Read Full Post »

BY ADAM REGN ARVIDSON, FASLA

Milwaukee cleans up the Menomonee Valley but keeps it working.

Milwaukee cleans up the Menomonee Valley but keeps it working.

From the April 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Menomonee means wild rice, and that is the original story of this river. Flowing just 33 miles across southeastern Wisconsin, it joins with two other smallish rivers (the Milwaukee and the Kinnickinnic) just before Lake Michigan to create a freshwater estuary—a back bay to the great lake. The estuary and valley were hunting, fishing, and rice harvesting grounds. Then European settlers came and saw this could also be a good spot for shipping, fixing, and building things.

The Valley, as it is often called, is a four-mile by one-half-mile swath of Menomonee River lowland that industrialized rapidly in the late 1800s. It became home to the great Milwaukee Road’s machine and repair shops—140 acres of railyards and mechanic sheds. In the first half of the 20th century, a middle-class resident of the neighborhoods north and south of the Valley could walk to a job that paid a living wage. Crossing the pedestrian bridges to the railyard, he would likely barely notice the stagnant, channelized, trash-strewn watercourse below.

In the 1980s, following a storyline familiar among midsized cities in the Midwest, the industries began to leave—and leave their messes behind. The Valley became a 1,200-acre scar on the city. “It was buildings that were falling down. It was environmental contamination. It was 60,000 cars driving by on the freeway looking at this property,” says Dave Misky, who has been leading the Valley’s (more…)

Read Full Post »

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

In February’s issue of LAM, you’ll find Sweetwater Spectrum, the winner of a 2015 ASLA Honor Award in Residential Design by Roche + Roche Landscape Architecture, designed for a community of adults with autism; Sundance Square Plaza in Fort Worth, Texas, designed by Michael Vergason Landscape Architects to transform a dead block in a resurgent downtown; and a report on what’s behind the numbers of the National Park Service’s  $11.49 billion maintenance backlog. And you won’t want to miss a fabulous project in Massachusetts, where a historic airport has reverted to a naturalistic wetland and meadow, designed by Crosby | Schlessinger | Smallridge.

In Water, a 1,000-year flood in Nashville brought about a park that works with rather than against water; and in House Call, a garden pavilion built from a steep cliff over the San Fernando Valley creates outdoor space with breathtaking views. And don’t miss our regular Now, Species, Goods, and Books columns. The full table of contents for February can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating February articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Welcome Home,” Marion Brenner, Affiliate ASLA; “Square Dance,” Brian Luenser Photography; “Roads to Ruin,” Philip Walsh; “Soft Landing,” © Charles Mayer Photography; “Nashville’s New Porch,” Matt Carbone; “Over the Edge,” © Undine Pröhl.

Read Full Post »

BY FRED A. BERNSTEIN

xxx

Daniel Biederman sweats all the details in a crusade to make parks that work.

From the December 2015 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Daniel Biederman’s desire to improve America’s parks has him patrolling green spaces from Santa Monica to Boston, issuing complaints about everything from a messy bicycle rack weld (“it looks like Play-Doh”) to the quantity of caution tape around an out-of-order bathroom (“people will think it’s a crime scene”). When he is in Manhattan, in his office overlooking Bryant Park, he tries to speak with each of his employees daily—he describes it as essential to their professional development. (“I have to build them up so they can interact with clients.”) But, as in the business of renovating parks, building up often involves tearing down. During a weekly meeting of his business improvement district minions, Biederman browbeat one employee over how he approached newspaper circulation executives (who, he explained, “are former truck drivers, with IQs of 97”); corrected the grammar of another; and ordered his social media team never to tell him a mention of one of his parks had “gone viral,” which he dismissed as a cliché. Instead, he told the team, “Give me real data.”

Asked about his tough leadership style, Biederman later said, “I can’t have kindergarten.”

He also can’t achieve (more…)

Read Full Post »

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

September’s LAM focuses on three issues in the world of education, including the questions surrounding the development of online landscape architecture degrees, the inclusion of concerns about social equity for the future of the profession, and the debate over the conversion of five-year BLA programs to four. And a rather grand renovation of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, campus by PFS Studio shows how the designers inject a modern attitude into a basic Beaux-Arts plan.

In this month’s departments, the city of Austin undertakes some creative master planning of four municipal cemeteries to combine history with a revenue source for future maintenance; Future Green Studio in Brooklyn is  designing with weeds; and two water-focused landscape designs involving Atelier Dreiseitl stress the need for an understanding of local ecology. And don’t miss our regular Now, Species, Goods, and Books columns. The full table of contents for September can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating September articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Learning Curves,” Hover Collective; “Graveyard Shift,” McDoux Preservation; “In the Weeds,” Tod Seelie; “Keep it Up,” Atelier Dreiseitl.

Read Full Post »

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The 272-page November issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine is the biggest of the year, if not the past five. Why the extra muscle? Perhaps abundance is in the air: This year’s ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO in Denver is looking to be one of our biggest ever.

This year, the ASLA Award of Excellence in General Design went to Gustafson Guthrie Nichol for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation headquarters in Seattle. Despite the difficulties the central Seattle site provides, the site’s landscape design echoes its past as a bog, and its present as a centrifuge of global and local ethics. In “Fire, Rain, Beetles, and Us,” Carol Becker looks at the interconnected catastrophes recently visited on the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. “Fluid Boundaries” finds the Colorado River reflow (“A Spring Flush on the Colorado,” April 24, 2014) is just one of several transnational projects to kick-start the riparian wetland along the Colorado River. Jayson DeGeeter, ASLA, talks to Guy Sternberg, the oak guru, about the species and his calling at Starhill Forest Arboreteum. “Detroit from the Ground Up” finds that landscape architecture is playing a major role in Detroit’s revitalization. And the photographer Alex MacLean and the journalist Daniel Grossman investigate the beginning and the end of the transborder tar sands oil trade.

Departments deliver this month as well: NOW has Editor Brad McKee’s perspective on the Rosa Barba Prize, updates on Changing Course, and elementary ag in NYC; Interview talks to Reid Fellenbaum, winner of the ASLA 2014 Student Award of Excellence in Analysis and Planning about his spooky-brilliant project, “Meridian of Fertility”; House Call features residential design in Arcadia National Park by Matthew Cunningham Landscape Architecture; and the Back has a portfolio of The Cultural Landscape Foundation‘s annual Landslide campaign, this year directed at saving site-specific artworks. All this and the usual rich offerings in Species, Goods, and Books. The full table of contents for November can be read here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating November articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: Gates Foundation, Tim Hursley; Pine Beetle, Paul Milner; Hunters Hole, Fred Phillips, ASLA; Guy Sternberg, Noppadol Paothong; Detroit, Detroit Future City; Alberta Refinery, Alex MacLean; Arturo Toscanini School, WORKac; Microtopographic Section Model, Reid Fellenbaum, Student Affiliate ASLA; Opus 40, © Thomas Hahn, 2014, Courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation.

Read Full Post »

A monthly roundup of the news, dispatches, and marginalia that caught our eye.

This month’s issue of the Queue delights in OLIN Studio’s new digital magazine, absorbs the inevitable wave of backflow on Rebuild by Design, and ponders the goat invasion of Long Island.

 

CATCHING UP WITH…

 

OUR WOBBLY WORLD

FIELD STUDIES

 

DISTRACT ME FROM MY DEADLINE DEPT.

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »