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Archive for the ‘NOW’ Category

BY DANIEL TAL, ASLA

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When it comes to new technologies, small investments can lead to big returns.

FROM THE MARCH 2017 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

As at many small firms, five years ago, the technology in THK Associates’s office mainly consisted of hand-drawn plans, some 3-D modeling, Photoshop, and CAD. Now, the firm is incorporating drones, 3-D printing, and virtual reality into many of its projects. Thanks in large part to Jon Altschuld, ASLA, a landscape architect and project manager at the Denver-based firm, THK is an example of how small firms can integrate new technologies into practice with little overhead.

On a number of recent projects, the firm used drones to collect 3-D terrain data and turn it into high-resolution aerials. Using an application called Maps Made Easy, Altschuld can automate the flight path of the firm’s Phantom 4 drone in as little as 15 minutes. The drone snaps a series of photographs that are then uploaded to Maps Made Easy’s cloud server, (more…)

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM. 

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Image courtesy of Roxi Thoren.

From “Living Lessons” by Victoria Solan in the March 2017 issue, on student investigations into how animals design their own environments.

“Earthworm art.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

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In Owens Lake, a land art installation draws on 100-year-old history while providing critical habitat.

FROM THE FEBRUARY 2017 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

When NUVIS Landscape Architecture was hired to assist the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) with its dust mitigation effort at Owens Lake (see “Dust to Bust,” LAM, October 2012), Perry Cardoza, ASLA, was given a list of objectives. Foremost, any design needed to tamp down the dust that had become a public health hazard, but it also would have to meet very specific habitat goals and help the department meet its water-use reduction targets. (LADWP has used up to 95,000 acre-feet of water annually for dust mitigation.) What was not on the list was any mention of land art.

“In everyone’s mind, this was going to be a hiking trail with a parking lot,” says Cardoza, an executive vice president at NUVIS. “We would have gravel and wetlands and some salt grass, and [we] would call it a day.” The project evolved, however, and the completed landscape, which opened to the public in April 2016 and won an Award of Excellence from the ASLA Southern California Chapter the same year, falls right into the land art tradition, even as it fulfills its mandate as an ecological booster.

Located on a tiny parcel—at 700 acres, the parcel is still just 1 percent of the lake’s total area—near the lake’s northeast boundary, the design includes a monument-like shade structure and a series of plazas and interpretive kiosks that are connected by four miles of walking paths. For Cardoza, what pushes the work into the realm of land art are its 14 (more…)

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BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

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Mapping the historic dunes hidden beneath the surface of Chicago.

FROM THE FEBRUARY 2017 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

A few years ago, Mary Pat McGuire, ASLA, became fascinated by the South Side of Chicago—or rather, with what was beneath it. She was flying back to the East Coast often, leaving from Midway Airport, and she started to notice “really interesting patterns along the coastline that looked like stripes, ridges along the shore. They were some kind of remnant,” she says, describing the landscape south of the city. “I just started to wonder, ‘What’s really going on here? What was this place?’”

McGuire, an assistant professor of landscape architecture at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, was already familiar with the South Side’s more recent history of white flight, shuttered industry, and disinvestment. Now, she became interested in the area’s geologic history, and how it might be put to work. The landforms she spied from the air prompted McGuire to look at early soil maps made by the U.S. Geological Survey. What she found were (more…)

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BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

Where has all the sediment gone? Image courtesy of Landscape Metrics and the Dredge Research Collaborative.

Where has all the sediment gone? Image courtesy of Landscape Metrics and the Dredge Research Collaborative.

From the December 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Thanks to a severe shortage of sediment, the tidal marshes of the San Francisco Bay are disappearing, taking with them a vital ecosystem and an important defense against sea-level rise. In response, in June 2016, voters approved a parcel tax that will generate $500 million over the next 20 years for wetland restoration. And yet the sediment hasn’t vanished; it’s a prisoner of the state’s highly altered hydrologic system. “There’s this incredible resource that’s just sitting behind this constellation of dams,” says Landscape Metrics principal Matthew Seibert.

This summer, as a part of DredgeFest California, Seibert worked with the Dredge Research Collaborative and workshop participants to visualize this “hidden sediment reserve.” Based on data published in the journal Water Resources Research in 2009, the team created an interactive map showing where—and when—California’s sediment was diverted, as well as the cost of removing that sediment, which far exceeds the expected $500 million in tax revenue. Seibert is optimistic, however, especially as the economics of climate change become increasingly apparent: “The Baylands have an amazing capacity for flood mitigation that I don’t feel is quantified economically yet, or valued as it should be.”

For an interactive version of this map, visit landscapemetrics.com/dredge.

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Courtesy of New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.

Courtesy of New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation.

From “Keeping Up Jones” by Jane Margolies in the November 2016 issue, which looks at a Robert Moses-designed beach long overdue for a naturalistic and resilient renovation.

“Hope you remember where you parked the Model T.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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BY JANE MARGOLIES

Diana Balmori Photo copyright Margaret Morton, 2009.

Diana Balmori. Photo copyright Margaret Morton, 2009.

Diana Balmori, FASLA, a pioneering member of the profession and founding partner of Balmori Associates, a landscape and urban design firm based in New York, died November 14 at her home in Manhattan at the age of 84. The cause of death was lung cancer.

During a career that encompassed wide-ranging projects—including the Winter Garden, with its grove of palm trees, inside the World Financial Center in New York and the transformation of the formerly industrial port area of Bilbao, Spain, into an expansive public park—Balmori championed the integration of landscape and architecture. She rejected the notion that landscape design was (more…)

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