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The Chicago Riverwalk was a 2018 ASLA Professional Award winner. Photo by Kate Joyce.

Submissions are now open for the 2019 ASLA Awards! Each year, the ASLA Professional Awards honor the best in landscape architecture from around the globe while the ASLA Student Awards give us a glimpse into the future of the profession. Award recipients receive featured coverage in Landscape Architecture Magazine, the magazine of ASLA, and in many other design and construction industry publications, as well in the general interest media. ASLA will honor the award recipients, clients, and advisers at the awards presentation ceremony during the 2019 ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture in San Diego, November 15–18.

Entry fees for the Professional Awards are due Friday, February 15, 2019, and all submissions are due by 11:59 p.m. PST on Friday, March 1, 2019.

Entry fees for the Student Awards are due Friday, May 10, 2019, and all submissions are due by 11:59 p.m. PST on Friday, May 17, 2019.

In need of inspiration? View the ASLA 2018 professional and student award-winning projects.

For any questions about the submission process, please e-mail honorsawards@asla.org.

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Photo by Brian Barth.

From “In the Hunt” in the January 2019 issue by Brian Barth, about Kinngaaluk Territorial Park in Nunavut, Canada, which will preserve the region’s flora, fauna, and Inuit traditions.

“Sacred soil solitude.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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It’s the beginning of January, which means the latest issue of LAM is here! You’ll find these stories inside:

FOREGROUND

Circle of Knowledge (Campus)
The University of Chicago’s Crerar Science Quad gets a well-rounded redesign.

Ready for Anything (Palette)
The landscapes of Karen Ford, ASLA, are making a mark in the Pacific Northwest.

FEATURES

In the Hunt
Kinngaaluk Territorial Park in Nunavut, Canada, will preserve flora and fauna,
as well as local Inuit traditions.

 Open Office
In Seattle, the spheres of Amazon’s new, plant-filled alternative work space
take their cues from an equatorial cloud forest.

All this plus the regular Now and Goods columns. The full table of contents for January can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting January articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Circle of Knowledge,” Kate Joyce Studios; “Open Office,” Stuart Isett; “In the Hunt,” Brian Barth; “Ready for Anything,” Karen Ford, ASLA. 

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BY ZACH MORTICE

The lago at Roberto Burle Marx’s Sítio, which he composed by eye from truckloads of species collected during his botanical expeditions. Image courtesy Julian Raxworthy.

It’s time for landscape architects to re-embrace what makes them fundamentally different.

 

Since its inception, it’s been hard to find much agreement in landscape architecture over the profession’s purpose and how it should work. For some contemporary designers, landscape architecture, in theory if a bit less in practice, is most visible when ecological systems are designed and deployed to remediate the earth, water, air, and biomes, often at an infrastructural scale. And yet, a profession wholly obsessed with infrastructure would to seem to miss the trees for the forest.

The Australian landscape architect Julian Raxworthy posits a way forward in his new book, Overgrown: Practices Between Landscape Architecture and Gardening, published by The MIT Press. Landscape architects, he notes, have retreated from the defining element of their corner of the spatial world: the development and management of planting design. Plants, he argues, are defined by their growth over time and the maintenance used to train them. Gardeners (whose ranks Raxworthy once populated) haven’t lost track of this fact. Growth is landscape architecture’s fundamental currency. From there, he launches into a populist call to tear down the blue collar/white collar divide between gardeners and landscape architects. Raxworthy (who is headed to Dubai, United Arab Emirates, after living in Cape Town, South Africa, for five years, teaching at the University of Cape Town) seems to admire messiness and rebellion against the bespoke and delicate. That preference is not surprising if you chat him up about his days as a music writer in the 1980s in Sydney, attending shows by Public Enemy and Dead Kennedys. Of one of his case study projects (created by a designer who never studied landscape architecture), he writes: “As a gardener rather than a landscape architect, the only plans Korte produced for the project were to satisfy the authorities. All other decisions arose organically through spending four years on site with a gang of four young German laborers who had returned from Brazil and smoked marijuana constantly. He looked back on this way of working with some nostalgia, saying that this time on site was the height of his career.” (more…)

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Photo by Alex MacLean.

From “Softening the Sound” in the December 2018 issue by Haniya Rae, about the sound-dampening berm that shields Pier 5 at Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates’ Brooklyn Bridge Park from the noise emanating from the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.

“Relaxing by the Pier 5 berm.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Photo by Scott Shigley.

From “Here Comes Everybody” in the December 2018 issue by Anne Raver, about Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates’ massive Brooklyn Bridge Park, which may well define Brooklyn’s relationship to its waterfront for generations.

“Dawn at Brooklyn Bridge Park.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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Mikyoung Kim, FASLA, accepts the 2018 ASLA Design Medal. EPNAC.

Every year, ASLA presents a number of honors to individuals and groups for their service to the landscape architecture profession and its ideals in the public realm. They include the ASLA Medal, the highest honor conferred by the Society; the Jot D. Carpenter Teaching Medal, given to a distinguished educator; and the Landscape Architecture Firm Award, given to an office that has built a distinguished body of work. ASLA also bestows honorary membership to nonmembers nominated for their service to the profession. (more…)

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