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Archive for the ‘PEOPLE’ Category

As part of an ongoing effort to make content more accessible, LAM will be making select stories available to readers in different languages. For a full list of translated articles, please click here.

Click above for a full PDF of the translated text with English text available below.

BY JENNIFER REUT / IMAGES BY SARA ZEWDE

FROM THE APRIL 2018 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

There are a number of arresting images in Sara Zewde’s proposal for a memorial at Valongo Wharf in Rio de Janeiro, but my favorite is the one with the water. In it, ghostly figures in white are faded back over a scrim of water overlaid on the sea. Above their heads is a diagram of points and lines that ricochet out from a dense cluster triangulating across the sky. The palette is one of muted blues and grays. It feels both transcendent and somber.

The diagram comes from one of the spatial analyses that Zewde did on samba, the distinctly Brazilian musical form with African roots that lives in the city’s streets and squares. It depicts the roda de samba, an informal dance circle of musicians and spectators who become musicians. The character of samba is both sad and happy, a shout of joy and a lamentation.

In July 2017, the Valongo Wharf Archaeological Site in Rio de Janeiro became a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Zewde helped write the nomination, and her ideas are threaded through the descriptions. Recognized for “Outstanding Universal Value,” for its material, spiritual, and cultural significance, the wharf was and is the central element in a landscape that profoundly shaped the history of the Western Hemisphere: the built environment of slavery. (more…)

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BY ZACH MORTICE

Images are the work of invited panel participants as noted. Collage courtesy UVA School of Architecture.

A UVA panel looks for ways landscape can lead the way in a city shaken by intolerance.

The Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on August 12, 2017, welcomed white supremacy, resulted in the murder of a counterprotester, Heather Heyer, and changed that city and a great many residents and members of the University of Virginia (UVA) community. There were torch burning, Nazi symbols, and chants of “Jews will not replace us” in the public spaces of what’s often painted as an idyllic Southern college town. That dichotomy will be the topic of a panel and presentation moderated by the UVA Architecture Assistant Professor Elgin Cleckley at UVA later this week. “Landscape Perspectives for Future Publics” will gather eight landscape designers, academics, and writers to present their visions of Charlottesville’s future and to consider the landscape implications of race. The presentation will occur on April 20 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at UVA’s Campbell Hall.

Presenters will offer rapid-fire imagery illustrating past/present/future triptychs for Charlottesville.

Participants will include: (more…)

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BY ZACH MORTICE

Image courtesy of the collection of Nicholas de Monchaux.

California is omnipresent in the world of science fiction. George Lucas filmed Star Wars: A New Hope in Death Valley, and the redwood forests of northern California sat in for the forest moon of Endor in Return of the Jedi. Perhaps the most influential sci-fi document in terms of futurist urbanism, Blade Runner, showed us the megacity Los Angeles with its rain and neon-slicked streets unmistakably reminiscent of a polyglot Chinatown. Larry Niven’s Ringworld books drew their prescription for a sun-orbiting space station—a million miles tall and 600 million miles across—from California’s own impressive history of infrastructural development.

Because of its historic reputation as the final, unspoiled end to the American Western horizon, California has always looked ahead into bracingly new futures. But as espoused by a studio to be taught at the University of California, Berkeley College of Environmental Design, unpacking California’s contributions to sci-fi urbanism and landscapes is also a look back.  BLDGBLOG’s Geoff Manaugh and the Berkeley architecture and urban design professor Nicholas de Monchaux will lead this Studio ONE master’s program, which will begin next school year.

“We have already terraformed one world whether we like it or not,” says de Monchaux. “We are living science fiction to some extent. We might as well acknowledge it and mine it.” Their studio asks: (more…)

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BY MADELINE BODIN

The video game Minecraft has become a new tool for community engagement.

FROM THE MARCH 2018 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

In Anaheim, California, the children couldn’t wait to show Pamela Galera, ASLA, the zip lines and tree houses in their parks. As she visited their creations, Galera, a landscape architect and planner for the City of Anaheim, saw the road on one side of the site and the river on the other, just as they are in real life. The landscapes, created by the kids using the video game Minecraft, were blocky by nature, but three dimensional, and from their laptops, they could explore the park designs from all directions.

Galera had no experience with Minecraft until recently, when Mojang, the company that created Minecraft, asked the City of Anaheim to use the game to help design a park. The design project would be featured at a Minecraft convention held in the city. “I am not a video game player,” she says, “so I had my concerns.” (more…)

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It’s the first, which means March’s issue of LAM is here! You’ll find these stories inside:

FOREGROUND

The Tiny Menace (Ecology)
The shot hole borer is having a deadly impact on California’s trees.

Raleigh Finds Its Inner Self (Planning)
New plans for downtown in Raleigh, North Carolina, could help move the
sprawling city beyond its complicated past.

Mind, Soul, Design (Palette)
The landscapes of Virginia Burt, FASLA, are grounded in practicality.

FEATURES: GGN PORTFOLIO

Drawn Together
The pursuit of excellence is embedded in the culture of GGN.

The Streets Are Back
CityCenterDC restores a historic downtown grid that had vanished for years
beneath a convention center.

Promised Land
GGN’s landscape for the National Museum of African American History and Culture
is both leveling and welcoming.

 Extended View
For the University of Washington’s Lower Rainier Vista,
GGN finishes a job that John Charles Olmsted started.

All this plus the regular Now and Goods columns. The full table of contents for March can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting March articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “The Streets Are Back,” Catherine Tighe; “Promised Land,” Alan Karchmer/NMAAHC; “Extended View,” GGN; “Drawn Together,” GGN; “The Tiny Menace,” Courtesy the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens/Maxx Echt; “Mind, Soul, Design,” Richard Mandelkorn; “Raleigh Finds Its Inner Self,” City of Raleigh.

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Photo by Timothy Hursley.

From “A Forest in the City in the Forest” by Jonathan Lerner in the February 2018 issue, on Sylvatica Studio’s immersive landscape design for the Fernbank Museum of Natural History in Atlanta.

“Pod view.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

Louisville’s Liberty Field is an urban destination for everyone—especially refugees.

FROM THE FEBRUARY 2018 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

Louisville, Kentucky, has long been linked with sports. Some know it as the home of the Kentucky Derby, others as the birthplace of the Louisville Slugger. But in recent years it’s become a city of soccer. In part, Louisville’s embrace of soccer follows national trends—soccer’s popularity has grown steadily since the 1990s—but it is also the result of decades of refugee resettlement. According to the Pew Research Center, in 2016, Kentucky had twice as many refugees (individuals who have experienced or have reason to fear persecution based on their race, religion, or nationality) resettled per capita as the national average.

This demographic shift inspired the creation of Liberty Field, a pop-up soccer pitch converted from an unused parking lot in the city’s Phoenix Hill neighborhood. The project, led by City Collaborative, a nonprofit urban research and design laboratory, is an attempt to better serve a population that is often overlooked. Patrick Piuma, a cofounder of City Collaborative, says he’s been troubled by the xenophobia that has become increasingly visible in many American communities. “The fastest-growing segment of our population is refugees and immigrants,” he says. “How do we humanize each other? (more…)

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