Category Archives: Planning

Placemaking Pitfall

Creative crosswalks are increasingly popular—except among the disabled.

By Timothy A. Schuler

A group of disability rights organizations raised concerns about a mural crosswalk in London’s Bankside neighborhood. Photo courtesy Better Bankside.

Viewed by both designers and departments of transportation as an inexpensive way to improve the public realm, street murals that embellish or sometimes even replace traditional crosswalks have become staples in the placemaking playbook. Continue reading Placemaking Pitfall

Northern Star

Stoss Landscape Urbanism’s design for the University of Michigan’s Gerstacker Grove melds ecological performance with technological proficiency.

By Zach Mortice

Gerstacker Grove is the only major piece of landscape connective tissue on the University of Michigan’s North Campus. Photo by Millicent Harvey.

The Eda U. Gerstacker Grove on the University of Michigan’s North Campus is the modern anti-quad. The North Campus is cloistered and suburban, separated from the main Central Campus by a mile-plus and the Huron River. Continue reading Northern Star

Roll, Tide

Gulf State Park in Alabama is one of the largest public projects to be funded through the Deepwater Horizon settlement. Many more are coming.

By Jared Brey

The Lodge at Gulf State Park was rebuilt as a sustainable tourism destination after a previous lodge, a popular vacation spot, was destroyed by Hurricane Ivan in 2004. Photo by Volkert, Inc., and Forrest Funk Drone Photography.

The Lodge at Gulf State Park is built directly into the dunes, so when you walk from the parking lot into the spacious lobby, you’re looking straight through the glass back wall of the hotel, across a stretch of white-sand beach, and out into the seemingly endless Gulf of Mexico. Continue reading Roll, Tide

High Profile

The High Line Canal reinvents an irrigation canal that shows off the region’s diversity.

By Haniya Rae

Littleton, Colorado’s DeKoevend Open Space Park is a three-mile trail following the High Line Canal. Photo by Evan Anderman.

Stretching 71 miles from south of Denver into Aurora, Colorado, the High Line Canal is a constructed feat of the late 19th century. Originally hand-dug to supply irrigation to local farmers, the canal is now in the midst of transformation from a historical relic to a burgeoning greenway. Continue reading High Profile