Category Archives: Preservation

Art Director’s Cut: The Bridge Builder

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

“Family roots.”

–Chris McGee, Art Director

Photo by Timothy A. Schuler.

From “The Bridge Builder” by Timothy Schuler in the November 2021 issue, about fourth-generation Arkansas Delta native Martin Smith, whose vision of an outdoor recreation-led reinvigoration of the delta is becoming a career-defining capstone.

Better Edges for Eels

On a living shoreline in Ontario, Canada, Seferian Design Group balances designing for erosion and endangered species.

By Timothy A. Schuler

The hybrid shoreline mitigates erosion while also enhancing terrestrial and aquatic habitat. Image courtesy Seferian Design Group.

On the northern shore of Lake Ontario, 25 miles outside Toronto, a quarter mile of once-eroding lakefront is a case study in resilient design for the Great Lakes. Continue reading Better Edges for Eels

Paths Forward

2022 Bradford Williams Medal Winner

As Canada comes to terms with a brutal colonial legacy, two landscape architect-led plans light the way toward reconciliation.

By Katharine Logan

The plan proposes a range of site infrastructure and interpretation, including a downloadable app with narration by Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in elders. Hemis/Alamy stock photo.

Across the Yukon River from Dawson City, up around 64 degrees latitude, the Top of the World Highway wends its way over 65 miles of unglaciated landscape to the border with Alaska. Continue reading Paths Forward

Art Director’s Cut: Paths Forward

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

“Indigenous medicinal plants on display.”

–Chris McGee, Art Director

Photo courtesy Brook McIlroy.

From “Paths Forward” by Katharine Logan in the August 2021 issue, about how landscape architects are working closely with First Nations communities in Canada to reconcile its ruthless history of colonization.

A Place for Harvey Milk

Harvey Milk was an openly gay political force at a time when they were in short supply. Can the plaza to honor him succeed where others have fallen short?

By Lydia Lee 

In the 1970s, Harvey Milk turned San Francisco into a symbol of hope for LGBTQ+ people everywhere. One of the first openly gay politicians in the United States, Milk was assassinated in 1978. Since then, the city has been without a substantive memorial to one of its most iconic figures. Continue reading A Place for Harvey Milk

Soldier Stories

Three new landscapes in Washington, D.C., honor the common soldier and fill gaps in the capital city’s memorial narrative.

By Kim O’Connell/ Photography by Sahar Coston-Hardy, Affiliate ASLA

Harvey Pratt, a veteran and member of the Cheyenne and Arapahoe tribes, was the original designer of the 12-foot steel circle that represents nature and harmony.

On the National Mall, it’s unusual to feel as if you’ve stumbled upon a secret, sacred space. Continue reading Soldier Stories