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Archive for the ‘RECREATION’ Category

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On the Cover: Students perch on an overlook at the Tennessee River.

“When Stars Align,” by Jared Brey. Thanks to years of work by students and faculty from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s School of Landscape Architecture, the 652-mile trail known as the Tennessee RiverLine has grown from a sparky idea to a full-fledged proposal. It is poised to be part of the region’s next era of people-centered infrastructure.

Also in the issue:
Russell + Mills Studios designs a riverfront for New Belgium Brewing Company in Asheville, North Carolina. | Landscape architect Martin Smith’s vision for revitalizing the Arkansas Delta has grown from passion project to a force for change. | Fallen Sky lands at Storm King Art Center. | Knoxville’s storied Loghaven re-emerges as an artists’ haven. | Seferian Design Group finds a material balance along Lake Ontario. | Carbon counting for city services in Reno, Nevada. | The High Line Canal is a vision for a 71-mile irrigation canal that runs along Denver’s eastern edge. | Goods features new exhibitors at ASLA’s EXPO in Nashville. | Three designers from SCAPE Studio reflect on Hurricane Ida. | A review of Site Matters: Strategies for Uncertainty Through Planning and Design, edited by Andrea Kahn and Carol J. Burns. | Seeking a way to translate wildfire risk in Lake Tahoe, a landscape artist lets the trees talk. 

 

Online this month from the November issue:

“Better Edges for Eels” by Timothy A. Schuler on November 2. On a living shoreline in Ontario, Canada, Seferian Design Group is designing to counteract erosion and provide a habitat for endangered species.

“Home Brewed” by Brian Barth on November 11. A connection with New Belgium Brewing Company led to a chance for Russell + Mills Studios to design the landscape for a brewery in Asheville, North Carolina.

“When Stars Align” by Jared Brey on November 18. A student project to connect people and public lands along a 652-mile river trail gathers steam. English and Spanish.

“High Profile” by Haniya Rae on November 30. The transformation of an irrigation canal east of Denver shows off the region’s diversity.

The full table of contents for November can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 250 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting November articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: Cover, photo by Tennessee River Studio; “The Bridge Builder,” Timothy Hursley; “When Stars Align,” Tennessee River Studio; “Home Brewed,” Mark Herboth Photography, LLC; “High Profile,” Evan Anderman.

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BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

Floridians are rallying to restore a rare Dan Kiley landscape, starting with 800 trees.

FROM THE SEPTEMBER 2021 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

 

On June 17, 1988, life changed for Laurie Potier-Brown, ASLA. She was living in Tampa, Florida, and working in marketing while also pursuing an MBA. Her company’s offices were located downtown, near the new NationsBank tower, Harry Wolf’s now-iconic concrete silo of an office building. That Friday, during her lunch break, Potier-Brown ventured down to the park that had just opened in conjunction with the building. She walked under the plexiglass-bottomed canal and up into the cool, leafy garden, and as she wandered through the grove of flowering crape myrtles and listened to the “gurgling of water running in the rills,” Potier-Brown says she decided to abandon everything—her job in marketing, her MBA—and become a landscape architect.

Thirty years later, Potier-Brown is part of a group working to help restore the park that so profoundly altered her career. Today it is known as Kiley Garden after its lead designer, the renowned modernist Dan Kiley—though for those who remember it, the garden is barely recognizable. Its 800 crape myrtles are gone, as are its allées of sabal palms. The clear-bottomed canal has been removed, and the reflecting pools one once crossed have been paved over. “They’re literally parking cars where the reflecting pools were,” says Christian Leon, the director of a local nonprofit and a supporter of the garden’s restoration. “There’s an entire parking garage underneath!” (more…)

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Photo by Iwan Baan.

From “Worlds Away” by Glenn Dixon in the September 2021 issue, about PWP’s Glenstone museum outside Washington, D.C., which makes a monument out of its art and its landscape.

“Winter at Glenstone.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 250 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Courtesy Glenstone Museum.

From “Worlds Away” by Glenn Dixon in the September 2021 issue, about PWP Landscape Architecture’s Glenstone museum outside Washington, D.C., where landscapes that shift through the seasons complement monumental sculpture.

“Inside out pond garden.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 250 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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FOREGROUND

Big Tree, Small World (Interview)
The author and entomologist Doug Tallamy’s new book, The Nature of Oaks: The Rich Ecology of Our Most Essential Native Trees, advocates for the environmental workhorse of trees.

One Big Picture (Water)
A comprehensive new map of the Colorado River Basin connects the watershed and the people.

FEATURES        

Licensure on the Line
After years of political attacks, the design professions are uniting to protect
against threats to professional licensure.

Worlds Away
Hidden in the leafy Washington, D.C., suburbs, Glenstone has been an insider’s destination for years. For a new expansion and outreach, PWP Landscape Architecture designed a landscape
for the confluence of big art and small moments.

The full table of contents for September can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 250 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting September articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Worlds Away,” Glenstone; “Licensure on the Line,” LAM; “One Big Picture,” Pete McBride; “Big Tree, Small World,” Rob Cardillo Photography.

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FOREGROUND

Piece by Piece (Planning)
Wisconsin’s Ice Age National Scenic Trail is a glorious homage to the state’s geology and conservation history. So why is it so hard to get it finished?  

The Outside Track (Interview)
For minority students on the path to the profession, exceptional persistence and mentors are
as important as design skills.

FEATURES

Paths Forward
The Canadian landscape is shaped by histories and losses of Indigenous peoples, which the government is only beginning to confront. Landscape architects at NVision and Brook McIlroy steward two master-planning efforts meant to embody the principles of reconciliation in action.

Time Goes By
Biel, Switzerland, was once a center of Swiss time makers; today it’s a multicultural city with a new urban magnet by Fontana Landschaftsarchitektur. Schüssinsel Park entwines a constructed,
flood-controlling island with elements designed to be wild.

The full table of contents for August can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 250 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting August articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Paths Forward,” Government of Yukon; “Time Goes By,” Switzerland Tourism; “Piece by Piece,” Cameron Gillie; “The Outside Track,” Dawson Photography.

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BY ZACH MORTICE

Nantucket Island, where impending sea-level rise hasn’t done much to slow the real estate market. Photo by Maggie Janik.

In the face of likely climate retreat, student design studios explore ways to improve Nantucket’s coastal resilience.

 

On Nantucket Island off the coast of Massachusetts, half of the 10 highest-ever tides arrived in 2018 alone, and flooding is a constant worry that imperils the tourist economy and historic buildings. “But that has not slowed down the real estate market,” says Cecil Barron Jensen, the executive director of the local nonprofit ReMain Nantucket. It’s been a “banner, record year” for buying and selling houses, she says. The average home price in Nantucket is nearly $1.8 million, according to Zillow, up almost 10 percent over the past year.

Real estate brokers on the island, Jensen says, talk about the flooding in terms of timelines. “How long do you want to enjoy this house? You can enjoy this house for this long,” she says. Even for the rich, the good life on Nantucket is becoming a finite commodity, as the dissonance between the hearty trade in beachfront views and climate cataclysm becomes harder to ignore.

Finding ways for Nantucket to coexist with rising floodwaters is the purpose of the Envision Resilience Nantucket Challenge, an initiative by Jensen’s ReMain Nantucket to bring aboard teams of design students in a collaborative design studio to propose solutions. Overall, these propositions, on exhibition at the Nantucket Historical Association’s Thomas Macy Warehouse through December, are focused on soft edges, careful retreats, and ways to get habitats, native ecologies, and people to mix and mingle with water productively. Students from five design programs (Yale, Harvard, the University of Miami, the University of Florida, and Northeastern University) presented their work—all produced remotely—to the Nantucket community in early June. (more…)

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