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Archive for the ‘SPECIES’ Category

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM. 

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Image courtesy of NUVIS Landscape Architecture.

From “White Water on Dry Land,” by Timothy Schuler in the February 2017 issue, on a drained lake’s second life as an eerily austere but powerful sculpture garden.

“Waves on still water.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

 

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BY ZACH MORTICE

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All photos by Jose Ahedo.

Over the course of two years, the Spanish architect Jose Ahedo visited livestock farming landscapes in eight countries: Mongolia, China, Paraguay, Germany, India, Bolivia, New Zealand, and the Azores Islands in Portugal. He traveled 90,000 miles by plane, 9,000 miles by car, 23 miles by boat, nine miles by horse and camel, and—most excruciatingly for a vertigo sufferer like Ahedo—56 miles by hot air balloon. Documented through his photography and funded by a $100,000 Harvard Graduate School of Design Wheelwright Prize Fellowship, his travels kept him on the move for 103,000 miles.

Ahedo selected these disparate locations so that he could witness the extreme “asymmetry,” he says, in how cultures in different places with different levels of development produce livestock. “You have people that move on horses, and (more…)

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BY KATARINA KATSMA, ASLA

An obsession with epiphytes leads to an ASLA Student Award.

An obsession with epiphytes leads to an ASLA Student Award.

From the December 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Brandon Cornejo, Student ASLA, wants to use epiphytes—plants that grow on other plants or materials and derive their nutrients from the air—to green the world. His project, “Feasibility Study of the Integration of Epiphytes in Designed Landscapes,” won the Award of Excellence in Research in the 2016 ASLA Student Awards. It measured whether rabbit’s foot fern (Davallia fejeensis), a type of epiphyte, could grow on building materials typical to the urban environment. With just a few cuttings, (more…)

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BY ZACH MORTICE

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The Living Filtration System. Illustration by Living Filtration System.

It’s the habitat that most determines the health of any ecosystem, but it’s largely invisible to the naked eye. The soil under your feet, if it’s healthy, is filled with all manner of micro-organisms, bacteria, and fungi that break down organic matter into fresh dirt loaded with nutrients, and nourish the plants growing there. Soil is the building block for all healthy biomes, and a critical concern for all landscape architects. It’s also a finite resource that’s been continually degraded (more…)

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BY KYNA RUBIN

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Portland scientists tap the bryophyte Orthotrichum lyellii to test urban air quality.

From the October 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine 

For decades, mosses and lichens have been used to gauge forest health, and in Europe they have been used to measure and map urban pollution across countries. But a recent study of air quality in Portland, Oregon, is said to mark the first time that U.S. scientists have used moss to collect and map fine-grained data on toxic metals in the air of a city. “This kind of high-density sampling on a large area is unique, at least in North America,” says Bruce McCune, a professor of botany and plant pathology at Oregon State University who is not associated with the study. “It allows you to make inferences and find surprises that you wouldn’t otherwise.”

Sometimes those surprises are unpleasant. Earlier this year, harnessing the bryophyte Orthotrichum lyellii to test the air quality of communities throughout Portland, (more…)

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM. 

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Photo by Forbes Lipschitz, ASLA

From “Catch of the Day” by Brett Anderson, in the October 2016 issue, featuring Forbes Lipschitz’s deep dive into catfish farms and Mississippi Delta foodstuffs.

“Drone’s-eye view.”

–Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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BY CONSTANCE CASEY

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Dr. Tu Youyou during the 1950’s.

Artemisia annua, a common roadside weed, is one of the humblest of the several hundred Artemisia species found all around the world. It’s dull and ragged, but it is instrumental in bringing a Chinese scientist to Stockholm to receive a Nobel Prize this December. The species is a shabby version of Artemisia ‘Powis Castle,’ familiar to gardeners for its lacy silvery foliage. Back in the 1960s Dr. Tu Youyou screened 2,000 traditional Chinese remedies in search of a new treatment for malaria. The malaria-causing parasite had grown resistant to quinine and other earlier drugs. Ho Chi Minh, in desperation because his soldiers were dying, appealed to Mao Tse-tung for help, and Mao set Tu to work. She found the clue in a 1,700-year-old manuscript that advised sweet wormwood, Artemisia annua’s common name, for intermittent fevers, a common malaria symptom. She found that an extract of the herbivore-repellent sesquiterpenoid lactones that give Artemisia its distinctive bitter scent killed the malaria-causing parasite. Born in 1930, Tu is still at work at the China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences in Beijing. You (you) go, girl.

Constance Casey, a former New York City Parks Department gardener, is a contributing editor to LAM.

Credit: By Xinhua News agency [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

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