Archive for the ‘SPECIES’ Category

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Image by Mithun.

 

From “Giant Steps” in the March 2019 issue by Jonathan Lerner, about Mithun’s subtle and restorative reframing of Yosemite’s land-titan sequoias.

“Sketch of the entrance plaza at Mariposa Grove.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

Public food forests grow as cities look for new ways to feed their people.

FROM THE MARCH 2019 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

 

It was the stand of pecan trees that first drew Mario Cambardella to the seven-acre property along Browns Mill Road in Atlanta. Looking up at the four giant pecan trees, Atlanta’s urban agriculture director decided that this was the place to test out the concept of a municipal food forest. “Then,” he says, “I dug deeper into the site and found another pecan orchard. There were tons of black walnut. There was mulberry.” Cambardella realized that the site already was a food forest. Instead of having to plant one, a team could sculpt what was already there. (more…)

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FOREGROUND

Sugar Substitutes (Preservation)
Reed Hilderbrand rethinks Storm King Art Center’s venerable Maple Allée.

Free Markets (Food)
Atlanta’s Browns Mill Food Forest will be a place for the community to gather,
as well as gather food.

FEATURES

Giant Steps
Mithun has made Yosemite’s Mariposa Grove a better experience for visitors as well as for its spectacular sequoias.

Taking the Wind Out of Wildfire
Ashland, Oregon’s new wildfire mitigation project could serve as a model for communities throughout the West.

Tree Line
In Ypres, Belgium, trees grow as living memorials to World War I dead.

All this plus the regular Now and Goods columns. The full table of contents for March can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting March articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Taking the Wind Out of Wildfire,” City of Ashland; “Giant Steps,” Christian Runge, ASLA; “Tree Line,” The National Archives, Kew, Ordnance Survey/Wikimedia Commons; “Free Markets,” Office of Resilience, City of Atlanta; “Sugar Substitutes,” © Courtesy Storm King Art Center/Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson.

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BY ZACH MORTICE

Fred Anderson Dog Park in Chicago. Photo courtesy Chicago Park District.

“Dog-friendly areas,” known as DFAs in Chicago Park District parlance, don’t come about easily in Chicago. But, says Nicole Machuca, the director of environmental education and neighborhood parks for Chicago’s Friends of the Parks (FOTP), “There is no doubt in my mind that communities all across the city want dog parks.”

But not all communities have them. A recent FOTP State of the Parks Report points out that the city’s wealthier, whiter North Side had 23 park district dog parks; the poorer, largely African American and Latinx South and West Sides had, until very recently, none. One dog park was added in the South Side’s Calumet Park last fall. There is also a completely independent dog park that’s not run by the city located in Jackson Park called Jackson Bark.

Currently, the park district’s process to establish new dog areas requires considerable grassroots community effort for support, organization, and funding. The park district’s 17-page manual  (more…)

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Image by SWA.

 

From “The Making of a Memorial” in the February 2019 issue by Timothy A. Schuler, about a memorial by Dan Affleck, ASLA, and Ben Waldo, Associate ASLA, commemorating the Sandy Hook Elementary School mass shooting.

“The ‘sacred sycamore’ at the Sandy Hook memorial.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Photo by Gabriella Marks.

From “The Huntress” in the February 2019 issue by Timothy A. Schuler, about Christie Green, ASLA, a landscape designer with a penchant for bow hunting and restorative ecologies.

“Elk’s jaw in detail.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER / PHOTOGRAPHY BY GABRIELLA MARKS

With her one-woman practice, Radicle, Christie Green works to repair our relationship with nature—including the animals and plants we eat.

FROM THE FEBRUARY 2019 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

 

The stars were still out when Christie Green, ASLA, parked her Tundra and turned off the engine. We were somewhere near Glorieta Mesa, Game Management Unit 45, about 30 minutes southeast of Santa Fe, New Mexico. In the moonlight, I could make out the bristle-brush tops of ponderosa and piñon pine. I grabbed the camouflage gear Green had lent me and got out of the truck. The April air was just a few degrees above freezing, and the only sounds were the howls of coyotes and the quiet murmurs of cattle somewhere in the valley. As the chill began to seep in, I tugged on my gloves and cowl. I had no idea how long we were going to be out there.

Green, who for the past five years has run a one-woman landscape design practice in Santa Fe called Radicle, had agreed to take me turkey hunting. Almost all of her projects, (more…)

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