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Archive for the ‘TRANSPORTATION’ Category

BY MARGARET SHAKESPEARE

A sophisticated stormwater system elevates Philadelphia’s Girard Avenue interchange.

FROM THE NOVEMBER 2017 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

Around the world, cities are demolishing, burying, or capping their elevated freeways, but an interstate in Philadelphia provides a possible alternative—one in which the highway stays up but connectivity, open space, and water quality are still prized. In redesigning three miles of Interstate 95 north of Center City Philadelphia, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation planned 27 acres of park and open space, and the first phase of the $1 billion project, due for completion by 2027, incorporates examples of green infrastructure. According to AECOM, the prime consultant on the project, landscape design and green infrastructure accounted for between 5 and 7 percent of the first phase’s total budget.

At the Girard Avenue Interchange, I-95 runs parallel to the Delaware River two blocks away. Rather than whisking stormwater runoff directly into the river, overtaxing an already burdened municipal system, or funneling a deluge into a rock pit, AECOM and other experts devised a treatment scheme of basins, weirs, bioswales, and rain gardens. Ten planted acres can capture the first inch of runoff (more…)

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Technologist landscape architects rejoice—the November issue of LAM is packed with imagined scenarios, myth breakers, and tantalizing possible futures for urban design. Whether or not autonomous vehicles will allow for utopian cities of tomorrow depends on careful planning and policies today, says writer Brian Barth. And the future of autonomous vehicles might not look as green as we’re imagining. A new landscape by Ki Concepts on Honolulu’s Ford Island—site of the Pearl Harbor attack in World War II—weaves the richly layered history of the site into a sleek, cohesive design. And a new streetscape redesign by CRSA in the Sugar House business district of Salt Lake City turns a large thoroughfare into an inviting multimodal streetscape.

In Materials, Jane Berger discusses the stigma—and benefits—of the often-misunderstood bamboo. And in Tech, geodesign unites academics and agriculturists in the pursuit of the most optimal yield for their yearly crops. All this plus our regular Books, Now, and Goods columns. The full table of contents for November can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting November articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “The Retraining of Salt Lake City,” CRSA; “Before and After Pearl Harbor,” Alan Karchmer; “Dream Cars,” Illinois Institute of Technology; “Raising Canes,” OvS; “Models of Collaboration,” Len Kne. 

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BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

An asphalt coating could help cool Los Angeles. Will the benefits offset the costs?

FROM THE OCTOBER 2017 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

Initially, the product was for the military. Marketed as CoolSeal, the light gray-colored asphalt seal coat was developed to reduce the surface temperature of runways so that they would be less visible to infrared satellites. A few years ago, Greg Spotts, the assistant director of the City of Los Angeles Bureau of Street Services, wondered what would happen if you painted every street in the city with CoolSeal. Could you reduce the urban heat island effect, a phenomenon that has been estimated to cost the city $90 million each year in energy bills?

Now, with $150,000 in public funding, Spotts is testing the coating at locations in each of the city’s 15 council districts. The coating, which is just 15 microns thick, goes on in a brilliant gray, far lighter in color than a typical asphalt street, though Spotts says it soon fades to more of a “battleship color.”

By this fall, all 15 streets should be complete, and according to the city’s asphalt testing lab, even in the afternoon on the hottest days, the surface temperature of the coated pavement is, on average, (more…)

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Los Angeles is an intriguing place for 2017’s ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO. It’s a car-centric metropolis in the throes of a rebirth in public transportation, a drought-parched region with a remarkably complex water infrastructure, and an image-conscious city with a deceptively robust urban foundation. The October issue celebrates the ASLA Annual Meeting with a look at Los Angeles’s, and California’s, big designs on the future.

Christopher Hawthorne’s Third L.A. Project brings to the forefront issues, including density and equity, that Los Angeles—and Angelenos—face with the reinvention of the sprawling, single-family-home-dominated city. Waving away the clouds of optimism around marijuana legalization and production, Mimi Zeiger investigates the costs and benefits to the landscape. And in a city where entertainment is king, Studio-MLA goes big with three sports stadium projects in the Los Angeles area.

Up the coast, a public housing project on San Francisco’s Potrero Hill gets connected to the city by GLS Landscape | Architecture, while trying to stave off gentrification that could follow. And AECOM’s work on the South San Francisco Bay restores ecosystems once battered by the salt industry back to their natural habitat.

Glen Dake, ASLA, talks about his firm’s commitment to resiliency and “meeting people in their language,” in Interview. Two gardens at the storied Garden Museum in London get a redesign by Dan Pearson and Christopher Bradley-Hole in Plants. A remediation plan by Fred Phillips for an Indonesian tin mining site includes providing an alternative livelihood for artisanal miners, in Planning. And in Palette, subtle layers compose the designed landscapes of Pamela Burton & Company Landscape Architecture. All this plus our regular Books, Now, and Goods columns. The full table of contents for October can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting October articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Salt Ponds to Pickleweed,” © AECOM/David Lloyd; “Third Way L.A.,” Marc Campos/Occidental College; “The Final Hill,” Kyle Jeffers; “Altered State,” © 2017 Grace & Co., Inc.; “Fan Favorite,” Tom Lamb; “Growing Obsession,” Garden Museum; “All Landscape Is Local,” Stephanie Garcia/Brian Kuhlmann Pictures; “Play It as It Layers,” Marion Brenner, Affiliate ASLA; “Smartphone Landscape,” Telapak.

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BY ZACH MORTICE

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The linear art installation SWA designed for Houston’s Highway 59/Interstate 69 bridges came with two important traffic safety stipulations: no words, and no faces (so as not to distract the drivers zipping by).

Natalia Beard, the lead designer, came up with a pixelated vision of bright colors splashing across several 300-foot sections of chain-link fence along the sidewalk of the elevated freeway. The linear imagery (called “Houston Bridges”) tracks the velocity and movement of the freeway. It gives you enough depth to ponder when stuck in traffic. The images came from photos by Houston schoolchildren, digitally turned into jubilant checkerboards of neon color.

This smoke-stained stretch of highway, which connects Houston’s downtown to its primary airport, is (more…)

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Please pardon the fish smells. The landscape architects at Taylor Cullity Lethlean and Wraight + Associates were trying not to cutify the waterfront of Auckland, New Zealand, too much with their master plan for 86 acres of port. So you get a park, a promenade, a playground, and outdoor dining, but you also get the sights and smells of an active fishing sector and the noises of maritime industry up close. The North Wharf Promenade and Silo Park won the Rosa Barba Prize at the Eighth International Biennial of Landscape Architecture in Barcelona in 2014 for the ways it takes waterside work at face value but makes room for people to relax and play. Our correspondent in Sydney, Gweneth Leigh, ASLA, tells this month how it came together.

You may have read in the New York Times last week about China’s push to be first in the world in developing artificial intelligence systems for things like speech recognition, rescue missions, and warfare. The newly appointed chair of landscape architecture at the University of Virginia, Bradley Cantrell, ASLA, and two colleagues recently wrote a paper in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution about prospects for deploying AI and “deep learning” systems in ecological restoration and management, based on several approximate examples they found currently in action. LAM invited Kristina Hill, an associate professor of landscape architecture and environmental planning and urban design at the University of California, Berkeley, to query the authors’ assumptions and, ultimately, ethical questions around such projected uses for AI, such as: Is a human-induced machine responsible for the effects of its actions, or is the human?

Back in 2008 the Atlanta BeltLine, the ambitious linear park planned to ring around the city, was just getting off the ground. LAM dispatched Jonathan Lerner to survey the role this unique trail might play. Today, big sections of it have been built—though it’s by no means complete—and enthusiasm for its impacts is far from universal. And Lerner has gone back to Atlanta to survey the victories, the asymmetries, and the mixed emotions surrounding the project.

In Books, don’t miss the review of two new books on logistics, by Gale Fulton, ASLA, an associate professor and chair of landscape architecture at the University of Tennessee, and what it reveals about the ways logistics not only shapes our landscapes, but has become them. The full table of contents for June can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating June articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Ecology on Autopilot,” Bradley Cantrell, ASLA; “The Wharf at Work,” Simon Devitt; “A Thousand Moving Parts,” Jeff Keesee; “In Search Of,” Courtesy HBB Landscape Architecture/Jed Share Photography; “Tame the Sun,” Courtesy SWA Group; “Yonkers Uncorked,” Christopher St. Lawrence.

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BY TIM WATERMAN

Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London, has switched off the public life support to London’s embattled Garden Bridge, a tempestuous, contested, and deeply symbolic idea that will die tightly clutching a sheaf of contemporary perversions of the civic good, a cautionary portfolio of design’s worst addictions.

Its life charts a course through the sordid world of politics and displays how the ambitions of the nation–state and the re-emerging city–state have uncoupled from democracy and attached to unplaceable global flows of power and money. The people are left helpless in a muddle of endless doubt, misinformation, threat, and the magical thrall of consumer glamour and celebrity pull. All this (more…)

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