Category Archives: Water

Nature’s Salary

A Florida rancher, among others, finds himself enmeshed in conservation’s next big thing: payment for ecosystem services.

By Jonathan Lerner 

Flooded agricultural land in payment for ecological services approach in interior Southern Florida.

Low dikes separate pastures on the Florida cattle ranch Jimmy Wohl’s father bought in 1962, when Jimmy was 12. Continue reading Nature’s Salary

Go! Fish!

Habitat benches and salmon skylights help fish feel at home.

By Katharine Logan

sea wall _blog
New design for Seattle’s Elliott Bay Seawall will include habitat for young salmon and a glass-floored promenade to allow light into the ocean.

Before Seattle grew up on its shores, Elliott Bay was a bluff-backed beach, with intertidal marshes and mudflats providing a complex and varied habitat for birds, fish, and marine invertebrates. Its sloping beaches offered salmon a safe passage through shallow waters, with plenty to eat along the way. Continue reading Go! Fish!

A River to Live By

How the Los Angeles River is evolving from a giant storm drain to something much more complex.

By Jennifer Zell, ASLA

The Glendale Narrows. Courtesy Peter Bennett/Green Stock Photos.
The Glendale Narrows, Courtesy Peter Bennett/Green Stock Photos.

 

 

In the early 2000s, if you were to ask L.A. residents about the Los Angeles River, chances are they wouldn’t have known the city has a river, or they might recall the concrete-lined drainage canal that can be seen while driving over downtown bridges. Continue reading A River to Live By

Boston Faces the Rising Sea

Yet another coastal city that’s looking for a way to “avoid the unmanageable and manage the unavoidable.”

By Elizabeth S. Padjen

Can Boston take action—enough action—to protect itself from rising waters before the next big storm? Or will the city tragically require its own Katrina or Sandy in order to muster the will to protect itself against repeated catastrophe? Continue reading Boston Faces the Rising Sea

Preservation as Provocation

Zheming Cai’s ASLA award-winning student project departs from military history to integrate tourism and landscape preservation.

Shute's Folly Island: Redefining Tourism Site Plan. Courtesy Zheming Cai.
Shute’s Folly Island: Redefining Tourism Site Plan. Courtesy Zheming Cai.

Undergraduate Zheming Cai’s ASLA award-winning student project to reimagine the historic military site of Shute’s Folly Island off coastal South Carolina took on the twin behemoths of preservation and tourism and forged them into a refined solution that balanced the site’s architectural and landscape histories. Continue reading Preservation as Provocation