The Utterly Meaningless Agenda 21

In sustainability programs and smart growth, some people see a United Nations plot to take over your community. 

By Linda McIntyre

The commissioners of Baldwin County, Alabama, are set to decide this month whether to file the comprehensive county plan the commission adopted in July 2009—a plan that cost $280,000—in the garbage can. Continue reading The Utterly Meaningless Agenda 21

The Trouble with Brick

Disability watchdogs have decided that brick sidewalks are nothing but trouble.

By Elizabeth S. Padjen

Rian K. Long.

Brick, beans, and cod—you know we’re talking about Boston. But nobody bakes beans anymore, and the feds have clamped down on cod fishing. Now, even brick is under siege. In the country’s most famous walking city, the dominance of the venerable paving material has been challenged by the decidedly more pedestrian concrete and asphalt. Continue reading The Trouble with Brick

Your Tent has No First Amendment Rights

Park design, regulation, and the Occupy protests.

By Lydia DePillis

Sarah Stierch

As the Occupy movement mushroomed around the country last October, most aspiring activists didn’t agonize over which patch of grass or concrete to take over in solidarity with those who were camping out on Wall Street. Continue reading Your Tent has No First Amendment Rights

Reparations Becomes a Park

The Port of Los Angeles wanted to move further inland. The neighbors said: We have a better idea. 

By Jennifer Zell, ASLA

The Arup designed cable-stayed pedestrian bridge has become an iconic image for the park. Photo by Craig Kuhner.

On the southern edge of the city of Wilmington, California, just before the Port of Los Angeles begins, lies the newly constructed Wilmington Waterfront Park. It will be remembered for some time, maybe this lifetime, maybe longer, as a place of contention. Continue reading Reparations Becomes a Park

The Magazine of the American Society of Landscape Architects