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Posts Tagged ‘Bayou’

Hurricane Harvey flooding and damage. Image by Jill Carlson (jillcarlson.org) from Roman Forest, Texas, USA [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

BY BRADFORD MCKEE

FROM THE OCTOBER 2017 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

Michael D. Talbott wasn’t shy in showing his hand about climate change. For 18 years, Talbott, an engineer, served as the head of the Harris County Flood Control District in Texas until his retirement in 2016. He flatly dismissed any links between climate change and the frequent extreme storms—four of them now since 2015—to hit Harris County, the nation’s third most populated county, and its seat, Houston, the nation’s fourth-largest city. The month he retired, Talbott told a team of reporters with ProPublica and the Texas Tribune that the flood control district did not plan to look at ways climate may be driving the extreme weather that affected Harris County. “I don’t think it’s the new normal,” he said of these weather extremes. (The person to follow him in the job of executive director, Russell A. Poppe, “shares his views,” according to the report.) People who are saying it’s the new normal, Talbott said, have “an agenda” to fight development.

Just as remarkable as Talbott’s denial of climate breakdown was his acquittal of the role that urban development patterns play in worsening or relieving floods. When Hurricane Harvey sat on the region for days in late August, many indignant arguments arose online that Houston’s development habits either most certainly or in absolutely no way helped create the hazards that flooded Texas Gulf Coast neighborhoods from Katy in the west (31 inches of rain) to Beaumont and Port Arthur in the east (47 inches), with Cedar Bayou (more…)

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We figured the cover to this year’s ASLA Awards issue would be timely, but not by a measure of days. We were thinking months and years. The project by Studio Outside of its Galveston Island State Park project, which won a 2017 ASLA Professional Award for Analysis and Planning, shows the gradual progress happening these days with the design of coastal sites given the realities of climate change. As the issue arrived in the mail the past week, Hurricane Harvey swamped Galveston and wasted a huge piece of the Texas Gulf Coast. (Zach Mortice talked to Studio Outside for LAM this weekend as the storm moved in and lingered.)

Along with Studio Outside in our September Awards issue are several dozen projects that heap brainpower on the urgent landscape priorities of today. Out of the 295 projects submitted to the Student Awards, 26 winners were chosen, and 38 Professional Awards were selected from the 465 submissions. In addition, the ASLA Honors highlight the many professional contributions recognized by the society, including the winner of this year’s Landscape Architecture Firm Award, Gustafson Guthrie Nichol.

As always, the digital edition of the September 2017 Awards issue is FREE,  and you can access the free digital issue of the September LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. You can also buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. Single digital issues are available for only $5.25 at Zinio or you can order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Credits: [Professional Award images only] Storm + Sand + Sea + Strand—Barrier Island Resiliency Planning for Galveston Island State Park, Studio Outside/Google Earth; Birmingham Residence, Marion Brenner, Affiliate ASLA; Digital Library of Landscape Architecture History, Benjamin George, ASLA; Klyde Warren Park, Marion Brenner, Affiliate ASLA; Fluid Territory: A Journey into Svalbard, Norway, Kathleen John-Alder, ASLA.

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BY BRIAN BARTH

Parks and bike paths embroider the city in the Bayou Greenway Initiative plan.

Parks and bike paths embroider the city in the Bayou Greenway Initiative Plan.

From the March 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Kinder Baumgardner, ASLA, the president of SWA Group and the managing principal of its Houston office, is not the type of landscape architect to shy away from controversial ideas. In 2013, at the zenith of the vitriolic debate around the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, he sent an unsolicited design proposal to the White House, the State Department, the Department of Energy, the Department of Commerce, and a slew of other federal agencies with a stake in the project. In it were a set of overlay maps of the proposed route that illustrated various ecological and cultural dimensions of the pipeline landscape, as well as a set of renderings suggesting that a bike path be built within the pipeline corridor from its starting point in Hardisty, Alberta, down to the terminus in Port Arthur, Texas, near Houston.

“It was roundly hated,” says Baumgardner of the idea, insisting it was not an endorsement of the pipeline but an attempt to puncture the status quo notion of “infrastructure as a one-dimensional thing.” Reactions were neatly divided along ideological lines. “Some people saw it as: ‘You’re trying to make this bad thing better, and that might mean it would get built.’ On the other side, people who were much more conservative were saying, ‘You shouldn’t be doing this; it’s going to make it difficult to operate and they’ll end up closing it down.’”

The Obama administration recently gave what appears to be the final ax to the (more…)

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