Tag Archives: By J.Reut

The River Beneath the River

This article is also available in Spanish

The Anacostia River flows into a better future.

By Jennifer Reut

For a long time, the Anacostia River didn’t even have a name. It was just the Eastern Branch, the other, less promising section of Washington, D.C.’s better known and more distinguished river, the Potomac. But it was always known as a fortunate course to the Nacotchtank, the Native Americans who used it as a trading post, and later to the European colonists who relied on the river’s deep port at Bladensburg, Maryland, to carry tobacco, and to the generations of farmers, tradesmen, and laborers who never seemed to run out of fish, fowl, and game to hunt. Continue reading The River Beneath the River

Out of Time

This article is also available to readers in Spanish. For a full list of translated articles, please click here.

Grappling with how to commemorate people enslaved at Brazil’s Valongo Wharf, Sara Zewde designs a way forward for memorials everywhere.

By Jennifer Reut
Images by Sara Zewde

There are a number of arresting images in Sara Zewde’s proposal for a memorial at Valongo Wharf in Rio de Janeiro, but my favorite is the one with the water. Continue reading Out of Time

Balancing Act

A lift behind the scenes helped bring the National Park Service into being.

By Jennifer Reut 

In February 1916, the American Society of Landscape Architects met in Boston for its annual meeting. Among the reports entered into the proceedings was one of the Committee on National Parks. The committee was made up of Frederick Law Olmsted Jr., Harris Reynolds, Stephen Child, Percival Gallagher, and Warren H. Manning, and it had been formed on the recommendation of ASLA President James Sturgis Pray in 1915, part of a groundswell of unease that had been brewing for several years over the fractured administration of the national parks. Continue reading Balancing Act