Tag Archives: By K. Logan

Weaving Place

As part of an ongoing effort to make content more accessible, LAM will be making select stories available to readers in Spanish.

Atlas Lab connects Mariposa County’s future to the native landscape.

By Katharine Logan

 

Sourberry, red willow, redbud, sedge: These are some of the plants native to the meadows and creek sides of Mariposa County, at the mouth of California’s Yosemite Valley, where for thousands of years the women of the Southern Sierra Miwuk Nation have woven them into baskets—for gathering food, for cradling infants high and safe while the women work, and for receiving babies as they’re born. Continue reading Weaving Place

Leases to Destroy

Resource extraction companies are moving on public lands like never before.

By Katherine Logan

Formerly part of Bears Ears National Monument, the valley’s Cedar Mesa Sandstone monoliths date back 250 million years. The Navajo, to whom the valley is sacred, interpret them as ancient warriors frozen in time. Photo by Drew Rush.

Since the creation of the Antiquities Act in 1906, American presidents have had the authority, the honor, and the privilege of designating as national monuments the country’s most culturally and scientifically significant public lands—including, by corollary, some of the most spectacular, biodiverse, heritage-rich, and downright magnificent landscapes in America. Continue reading Leases to Destroy

Go! Fish!

Habitat benches and salmon skylights help fish feel at home.

By Katharine Logan

sea wall _blog
New design for Seattle’s Elliott Bay Seawall will include habitat for young salmon and a glass-floored promenade to allow light into the ocean.

Before Seattle grew up on its shores, Elliott Bay was a bluff-backed beach, with intertidal marshes and mudflats providing a complex and varied habitat for birds, fish, and marine invertebrates. Its sloping beaches offered salmon a safe passage through shallow waters, with plenty to eat along the way. Continue reading Go! Fish!