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Posts Tagged ‘Chinatown’

BY ZACH MORTICE

Image courtesy of the collection of Nicholas de Monchaux.

California is omnipresent in the world of science fiction. George Lucas filmed Star Wars: A New Hope in Death Valley, and the redwood forests of northern California sat in for the forest moon of Endor in Return of the Jedi. Perhaps the most influential sci-fi document in terms of futurist urbanism, Blade Runner, showed us the megacity Los Angeles with its rain and neon-slicked streets unmistakably reminiscent of a polyglot Chinatown. Larry Niven’s Ringworld books drew their prescription for a sun-orbiting space station—a million miles tall and 600 million miles across—from California’s own impressive history of infrastructural development.

Because of its historic reputation as the final, unspoiled end to the American Western horizon, California has always looked ahead into bracingly new futures. But as espoused by a studio to be taught at the University of California, Berkeley College of Environmental Design, unpacking California’s contributions to sci-fi urbanism and landscapes is also a look back.  BLDGBLOG’s Geoff Manaugh and the Berkeley architecture and urban design professor Nicholas de Monchaux will lead this Studio ONE master’s program, which will begin next school year.

“We have already terraformed one world whether we like it or not,” says de Monchaux. “We are living science fiction to some extent. We might as well acknowledge it and mine it.” Their studio asks: (more…)

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BY BRADFORD MCKEE

The storefront gallery. Image courtesy of LAM.

First, our thanks to the many members and supporters of ASLA who gave their pledges, time, and enthusiasm to help build a new home for us all, the Center for Landscape Architecture. We are holding its public opening this week. What’s especially nice is that the center is our beloved old home, our sweet, four-story, 12,000-square-foot brick box in Chinatown, D.C. It is beautiful.

Sixteen months ago, all 50 of us moved over to Metro Center, into half our usual footage (nobody died, though it’s boring over there). Back home on Eye Street, Coakley & Williams Construction blew out all the gypsum walls that cut up the insides of our building, pulled out half a puzzling scissor stair that, we’re told, wouldn’t meet code today, and found a lot of daylight in the three-story atrium it leaves behind.

The building was redesigned by Gensler. Our lower-level garden is by Oehme, van Sweden. We had such fun bringing it together. It went fast; the hard part to believe is that we began the project in 2014. The process was always focused on embodying the mission and vision of ASLA. We already had the ASLA Green Roof, by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, which opened in 2006 (more…)

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