Posts Tagged ‘coding’

BY AIDAN ACKERMAN, ASLA

The collaborative power of information-driven modeling software.

FROM THE JUNE 2019 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE. 

 

It’s a familiar scene in landscape architecture offices of all sizes: Around a conference table, a debate arises about the benefits and drawbacks of adopting a Building Information Modeling (BIM) work flow. The advantages of BIM adoption are rarely as obvious as the drawbacks. The popular architecture-centric Autodesk Revit software lacks functional landscape modeling tools, though it has a library of building objects such as floors, windows, doors, and roofs. Vectorworks, a more landscape-focused BIM software, does not exchange files directly with Revit, an obstacle that impedes digital collaboration with architects. Regardless of the software being used, the up-front costs of adopting BIM, such as software and training expenses, can quickly eat up profits. Yet despite these challenges, landscape architects are beginning to include BIM in their digital toolboxes. A recent survey by the American Society of Landscape Architects’ Digital Technology Professional Practice Network, with Benjamin George, ASLA, of Utah State University and Peter Summerlin, ASLA, of Mississippi State University, found that 21.8 percent of the 480 ASLA members who responded said their firm currently uses Revit, and 30.6 percent were interested in adopting a BIM work flow. Of those currently using Revit, 12.39 percent use the software daily, and 11.06 percent said it is extremely important to their work flow.

The “B” in BIM stands not for an architectural building but for the process of building something, an acronym that hints at BIM’s strengths in capturing the construction feasibility of a design project. BIM models contain information such as material assemblies, structural details, and quantities, all coordinated in a single file that can also be used to generate plans, sections, perspectives, and detail drawings. BIM is a popular and established work flow for architects: In a 2018 survey of more than 2,000 architecture firms, the American Institute of Architects found that 45 percent of architecture firms use BIM for billable projects, an increase from 40 percent in 2015. The largest area of growth in BIM adoption is among firms with fewer than 10 employees, which increased to 34 percent in 2017 from 28 percent in 2015. The report also shows that 71 percent of architecture project revenue comes from BIM projects, with no major differences across firm sizes or areas of specialization. With greater numbers of architects adopting BIM, landscape architects have begun to forge their own path toward this complex technology.

The main draw of using BIM for landscape architects lies not in its modeling prowess, but rather in the ways it enables communication among designers. Landscape architects who work with architects typically encounter frustration when it comes time to (more…)

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Iconic projects and designers are in the spotlight in July’s issue of LAM. Eight years after opening, the Rose Kennedy Greenway—housed over a sunken highway in the middle of downtown Boston—has become a treasured spot for tourists and locals alike. The new Mosholu driving range in the Bronx, designed by Ken Smith Workshop, sits atop one of New York’s largest public works project, the Croton Water Filtration Plant. Anthony Acciavatti, the author of the new book Ganges Water Machine: Designing New India’s Ancient River, discusses the history and influence of India’s sacred river. And plans, drawings, and paintings by the famed Brazilian landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx are celebrated for their artistic value at the Jewish Museum in New York.

In the departments, Interview brings together two authors to discuss their books on wild landscape design, then computational logic and coding pave new avenues for landscape architectural practice in Tech. And don’t miss our regular Now, Species, Goods, and Books columns. The full table of contents for July can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating July articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “The Big Sprig,” Sahar Coston-Hardy; “Driving Concern,” Alex S. MacLean/Landslides Aerial Photography; “A Course in Change,” Anthony Acciavatti; “Where Roberto Burle Marx Belongs,” © Tyba; “Wild Times,” Charles Steck; “Follow the Script,” Responsive Environments and Artifacts Lab/Bradley Cantrell, ASLA; Justine Holzman, Associate ASLA; Leif Estrada.

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