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Posts Tagged ‘CONSTRUCTION’

BY SARAH COWLES

At Washington University, students document and memorialize a landscape in flux.

FROM THE SEPTEMBER 2017 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

The crane whined, the cable tightened, the tree swayed, and the crowd murmured. But Tree B5, an 80-year-old, 85-foot-tall, 15-ton Quercus palustris, did not budge from its place in the Brookings allée. Earlier, a crew used high-pressure hydro-excavation tools and a giant vacuum to daylight the oak’s filigree of roots, and arborists jumared up with four cable slings to steady the crown. The audience in front of the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University in St. Louis was transfixed by this massive marionette, anticipating the moment the formidable machine might pluck it like a weed. After the failure of the initial tug, the crew phoned the crane supervisor to ply more tension, and yet some grounding force would not let go. B5 was defiantly planted.

Choreographing this potent—and at times absurdly moving—tree-removal ceremony was Jesse Vogler, Affiliate ASLA, a 21st-century Fitzcarraldo and an assistant professor of landscape architecture at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts. Vogler and his team of students thought this act of landscape demolition (more…)

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Filmed over 18 months by Jim Richards Productions of Reston, Virginia, this time-lapse look into the construction of ASLA’s new home begins with a few swings of the sledgehammer by ASLA executive committee members and staff. Builders Coakley & Williams Construction installed green walls, opened up the roof for a three-story atrium, and dug into the earth to bury a stormwater collection cistern. The design by Gensler, with a lower-level garden by landscape architects Oehme, van Sweden, sets the Center for Landscape Architecture up to act as a leader in workplace design and ecological stewardship for decades to come.

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Flickr_-_USCapitol_-_AOC_Stone_Masons_at_Work

Stone masonry work in progress at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. Credit: By USCapitol [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

Construction has been brisk across most of the country the past year, but material costs are not bad and are expected to hold steady this year, if not drop a bit more, given falling fuel prices and weakness in China and elsewhere. But the construction labor market is tightening; construction wages will likely need to go up, and some areas may see labor shortages. All this info comes in an excellent roundup on the shape of the current construction economy over at Equipment Today. Rod Dickens called on economists from the Associated Builders and Contractors, the National Association of Home Builders, the Portland Cement Association, the Associated General Contractors of America, and IHS Global Insight. Take the forecasts as you will, but the remarks on the current status of the market are as informed as any report card you’ll likely find. The full rundown is here.

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