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Posts Tagged ‘Gensler’

Filmed over 18 months by Jim Richards Productions of Reston, Virginia, this time-lapse look into the construction of ASLA’s new home begins with a few swings of the sledgehammer by ASLA executive committee members and staff. Builders Coakley & Williams Construction installed green walls, opened up the roof for a three-story atrium, and dug into the earth to bury a stormwater collection cistern. The design by Gensler, with a lower-level garden by landscape architects Oehme, van Sweden, sets the Center for Landscape Architecture up to act as a leader in workplace design and ecological stewardship for decades to come.

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BY BRADFORD MCKEE

The storefront gallery. Image courtesy of LAM.

First, our thanks to the many members and supporters of ASLA who gave their pledges, time, and enthusiasm to help build a new home for us all, the Center for Landscape Architecture. We are holding its public opening this week. What’s especially nice is that the center is our beloved old home, our sweet, four-story, 12,000-square-foot brick box in Chinatown, D.C. It is beautiful.

Sixteen months ago, all 50 of us moved over to Metro Center, into half our usual footage (nobody died, though it’s boring over there). Back home on Eye Street, Coakley & Williams Construction blew out all the gypsum walls that cut up the insides of our building, pulled out half a puzzling scissor stair that, we’re told, wouldn’t meet code today, and found a lot of daylight in the three-story atrium it leaves behind.

The building was redesigned by Gensler. Our lower-level garden is by Oehme, van Sweden. We had such fun bringing it together. It went fast; the hard part to believe is that we began the project in 2014. The process was always focused on embodying the mission and vision of ASLA. We already had the ASLA Green Roof, by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, which opened in 2006 (more…)

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BY ZACH MORTICE

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The abandoned Michigan Central Station in Detroit. Image courtesy of Zach Mortice.

In a city beset by a nearly incomparable foreclosure crisis and 20 square miles of vacant land, there’s been a growing understanding that landscape architecture and Detroit are perfect for each other. But in 2017, the city will unveil a handful of new proposals on how the discipline can grow back healthy urbanism in the Motor City.

Detroit announced early this month that, after an RFP process, it is awarding a total of $1.6 million across four project teams to plan landscape and streetscape improvements including green stormwater management and infrastructure upgrades. Each team will focus on a group of neighborhoods, (more…)

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The redesign will open the stairwell for better light circulation. Credit: Gensler.

For the next eight months or so, the ASLA national headquarters building, located in the heart of Chinatown in Washington, D.C., will undergo renovations to transform its outdated interior into the new ASLA Center for Landscape Architecture. The society sees the renovations, designed by D.C.-based Gensler, as an opportunity to fully represent the “image and ethic of its great profession.” The ASLA staff is eager to see the sunlight-filled space and a vast, open-floor layout for conferences and events.

Starting December 16, ASLA will be temporarily relocated to 601 13th Street NW in Washington, D.C., while renovations take place. All staff phone and emails will remain the same, and any mail addressed to ASLA should continue to be sent to 636 I Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20001.

While all of ASLA’s many services will be available during this time, ASLA’s library and archival collection will be temporarily unavailable, including all awards materials, membership handbooks, past LAM issues, and Fellows files. However, Brooke Hinrichs, ASLA’s Research/Collections Analyst, will still be able to access the Fellows database and conduct searches for magazine citations. For more information or library contact info, please visit here.

For more information on the new ASLA Center for Landscape Architecture, please visit here.

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