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Posts Tagged ‘Hargreaves Associates’

BY SARAH COWLES

Designers find new ways to tell communities about climate change.

FROM THE DECEMBER 2018 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

 

In the early 1920s, leaders of the Soviet Union had a communication problem: how to relay the abstract and complex communist ideology and economy to their scattered constituents across several nations, languages, and varying literacy levels. Enter the agit-train, a multimedia spectacle covered with constructivist supergraphics that drew crowds at every stop. The agit-trains carried agitprop (agitation propaganda) acting troupes, movie theaters, printing presses, pamphlets, and posters.

Today, leaders of coastal cities are facing an urgent communication issue: how to draw public attention to the looming threats of climate change and sea-level rise. Last winter, 10 teams in the San Francisco Bay area were selected to participate in the Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge, “a yearlong collaborative design challenge bringing together local residents, public officials, and local, national, and international experts to develop innovative, community-based solutions that will strengthen our region’s resilience to sea-level rise, severe storms, flooding, and earthquakes.” Resilient by Design, funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, built on the success of the Rebuild by Design initiative, which focused on the post-Hurricane Sandy landscape of New York and New Jersey. Each team was assigned to a swath of bay lands, where a confection of urbanization, predevelopment remnants, and infrastructure collide. A significant component of the initiative was public outreach, to address the issues germane to the most vulnerable communities that are already facing pressure from gentrification.

A significant, and perhaps unexpected, outcome within the Resilient by Design process was a revolution in public outreach, one that echoes Soviet agitprop methods. Three teams, Field Operations, Bionic, and HASSELL+, designed new physical devices, events, or spaces that kick-started public participation in the design process and informed residents on methods of climate change adaptation. Bionic and Field Operations wrapped vehicles with supergraphics to create a striking visual presence at community events, while the HASSELL+ team repurposed a former bank as an info shop. Their agitprop works were especially suited to the constraints of Instagram. The supergraphics make striking backgrounds for selfies, and all teams made liberal use of hashtags. These bold environments prompted action in real and virtual communities.

The Field Operations concept for urban resilience is simple: (more…)

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It’s the beginning of July, which means the latest issue of LAM is here! You’ll find these stories inside:

FOREGROUND

 Urban Scanner (Interview)
Shannon Mattern’s book, Code and Clay, Data and Dirt: Five Thousand Years of Urban Media, uncovers the way information has shaped our cities.

The Hole Story (Parks)
Hornsby Quarry in New South Wales was thought too big to fill and too unsafe to leave open.
Now it could be a park.

Palms Out (Plants)
Palm trees may be iconic of Miami or Los Angeles, but they can
thrive in more—and colder—places than you may think.

FEATURES

The Old and the Neutral
In New Orleans, Hargreaves Associates weaves the hopeful future into
the industrial past in Crescent Park.

Two London Squares and a Theory of the Beige Hole
Sleek, tidy, generic: a critique of Fitzroy Place and Rathbone Square, two privately owned
public spaces in London’s West End.

Balancing Act 
In a wetter world, how do we weigh the need to adapt to the future
against the imperative to preserve the past?

All this plus the regular Now and Goods columns. The full table of contents for July can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting July articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Two London Squares and a Theory of the Beige Hole,” londonsurvival/JOEHOOVER (londonsurvival.wordpress.com); “The Old and the Neutral,” Timothy Hursley; “Balancing Act,” Newport Restoration Foundation/Ashley Braquet; “Palms Out,” Botanics Wholesale; “The Hole Story,” Hornsby Shire Council; “Urban Scanner,” Michael K. Chen and Justin Snider, Michael K. Chen Architecture.

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Photo by Iwan Baan, courtesy Diller Scofidio + Renfro.

From “Soft Power in Moscow” by Stephen Zacks in the April 2018 issue, about how an ambitious riverfront park has radically revised Russian notions of the public sphere.

“Russian rave.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

 

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BY STEPHEN ZACKS

An expansive park at the foot of the Kremlin helped drive a series of revolutionary improvements to the Russian capital.

FROM THE APRIL 2018 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE. 

At Zaryadye Park in central Moscow, a procession of Eurasian birch trees, grasses, and shrubs winds downhill from a glass-encrusted outdoor amphitheater that tops the new Philharmonic Hall, framing photogenic views of the candy-colored cupolas of Saint Basil’s Cathedral. The park’s verdant terrain folds onto the rooftops of five scalloped pavilions that shelter a botanical display, an educational center, a food court, and a screening room that plays an immersive 3-D film on Russian history. The park, which covers 32 acres, stretches to the edge of Red Square, and even adds 11 square feet to the square that was uncovered during excavation. The pavilions, with their vegetated roofs, and most of the park’s terrain sit atop a 430-car underground parking garage. To keep the whole landscape in place, a geocell soil-stabilization system rests on top, anchoring granite pavers on pedestrian pathways that stretch onto an arching, boomerang-shaped overlook that cantilevers and hovers over the Moskva River. Here visitors of all ages and groups compulsively photograph themselves against the backdrop of the Kremlin and the Kotelnicheskaya Embankment Building, one of the Stalinist high-rises that define Moscow’s skyline.

Zaryadye Park is an entertaining landscape intended as a spectacular place, a special attraction, and a free public space—a term that Russian architects agree had almost no precedent in the language before a series of convergences brought the park into being. (more…)

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The new Nature Gardens at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County by Mia Lehrer + Associates provides habitat for the city’s surprisingly diverse wildlife and brings the museum’s research outside; Gweneth Leigh, ASLA, compares the dull and outdated playgrounds of the past to two challenging, yet exciting, Australian playgrounds by Taylor Cullity Lethlean and James Mather Delaney Design; and Lauren Mandel, Associate ASLA, looks at how research at the Chicago Botanic Garden roof gardens by  Oehme, van Sweden Landscape Architecture are designed to provide hard data on suitable plants and soil depths.

In our departments, Now highlights Louisiana’s wildlife management areas, Dirk Sijmons’s studies of energy and landscape, and a new program that puts chief resilience officers in cities; Water takes a look at the Miami Conservancy District in Ohio; Practice features an unusual partnership between a salt merchant and the firm Landing Studio; and in The Back Jonathan Lerner wonders if MOMA’s exhibit, Urban Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities, is as tactically urban as it aims to be. All this plus our regular Species, Goods, and Books columns. The full table of contents for January can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating  January articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “So Cal,” Luke Gibson Photography, Courtesy Mia Lehrer + Associates; “No, No, You Go First,” Brett Boardman; “This Is a Test,” Robin Carlson/Courtesy Oehme, Van Sweden; “A Plan to Plan?” Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries/The Conservation Fund; “Dry on a Good Day,” Courtesy Miami Conservancy District; “Strange Companions,” Courtesy Landing Studio; “Growing Pains,” Courtesy NLÉ and Zoohaus/Inteligencias Colectivas.

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The focus is on Philadelphia in the new issue of LAM, with stories on four projects by OLIN Studio in their hometown as well as pieces on the city’s green infrastructure, new habitats at the zoo, special-use parks, and a hardworking new green space on the Penn campus by Andropogon. All this along with the regular features in Goods, Now, and Species, a fresh look at André Le Nôtre’s legacy, and a new book on the work of Hargreaves Associates. Read the full table of contents for January here or preview the digital issue of the January LAM here.

All in?  You can buy the current issue of the magazine at more than 200 bookstores including many university and independents as well as at Barnes and Noble. You can also purchase single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio. Want more? Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options. Check in with the LAM blog as we’ll be ungating some of the January issue as the month rolls out.

Image credits: Cover, © OLIN/Sahar Coston-Hardy; Rodin Museum, © OLIN/Sahar Coston-Hardy; Shoemaker Green, Andropogon Associates; Palette, Steven Gierke, ASLA/Courtesy Hoerr Schaudt; Museum of  Freeway Art, SWA Group; Sister Cities Park, Todd Mason at Halkin Architectural Photography.

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