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Posts Tagged ‘James Corner Field Operations’

BY TOM STOELKER

At Paterson Great Falls, one of the newer national parks, Americans made many things, including history.

At Paterson Great Falls, one of the newer national parks, Americans made many things, including history.

From the August 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Paterson, New Jersey, is a tough town. Gang violence is prevalent, teachers are being laid off, and about 30 percent of the city’s residents live in poverty. But the city’s got soul. On Market Street, the lively main thoroughfare, bachata music spills from 99-cent stores, and the scent of Peruvian food wafts through the air. Paterson has been a magnet for immigration since the 19th century, and the reason why is found nearby. Twenty minutes from the center of town is the Great Falls, now part of Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park, where the Passaic River makes a majestic drop of 77 feet off basalt rock cliffs before it continues its twisted path. These are the falls that made Paterson.

In 1778, Alexander Hamilton, General George Washington’s aide-de-camp, recognized the river’s potential to harness power for both manufacturing and geopolitics. Hamilton understood the young nation needed to grow its industry to be independent of Europe. Through a group he helped form in 1791, the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures (SUM), Hamilton chose Paterson as the site of the nation’s first planned manufacturing development.

Gianfranco Archimede, who today directs Paterson’s Historic Preservation Commission, said: “At the end of the war, the king essentially said, (more…)

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BY NATE BERG

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Agence Ter has won a bake-off to redesign Pershing Square in downtown Los Angeles for the fifth or sixth time. Or is it the seventh?

From the June 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

On a warm May weekday morning, Pershing Square in downtown Los Angeles was, as usual, a bit of a hybrid wasteland. Office workers crossed through as homeless people sprawled across concrete benches. Half the park was closed off for a row of plywood vendor booths related to an upcoming event. A father and son played alone in one of the park’s newly built playgrounds. People walking dogs veered toward the small patches of dirt that break up the park’s vast expanse of sun-baked concrete.

In the middle of the park, under a sheet of black fabric, stood the park’s potential future, a product of an eight-month international design competition. The winning design, unveiled for a crowd of about 75 people, reimagines the park as a wide-open public plaza, with large grassy areas, plentiful shade trees, and a large constructed canopy stretching the entire length of the space. It would be “a timeless design able to grow with a changing community and city,” Henri Bava, a founder of the Paris-based lead of the winning team, Agence Ter, told the crowd. “We will make sure that Pershing Square will become, once again, the dynamic heart of Los Angeles.”

History alone would seem to dictate that Pershing Square is due for a demolition. It’s a predictable cycle for the once and perhaps future (more…)

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BY MIMI ZEIGER

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To revive downtown, the city appears poised to drive right through a masterpiece.

From the December 2014 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

The city of Fresno sits in the middle of California’s San Joaquin Valley. When you drive into town from Los Angeles, the landscape is agricultural and framed by roadside eucalyptus trees. It gives way to off-ramp clusters of gas stations, fast-food chains, and light industrial warehouses. Most of Fresno’s neighborhoods, after nearly 50 years of decentralization and flight from the urban core, sprawl north, tracking the edge of the San Joaquin River. The city’s historic downtown and civic center are a near ghost town.

At the heart of downtown is the Fulton Mall. In the early part of the 20th century, it was Fresno’s main drag, Fulton Street, six blocks lined with banks and department stores. In 1964, the landscape architect Garrett Eckbo turned the street into a modernist pedestrian mall as part of a master plan for downtown Fresno by Victor Gruen Associates. Photographs of the period show a wide promenade full of people flanked by the awnings of existing buildings. Daffodils peek out of Eckbo’s sculptural planting beds, fountains gurgle, and a clock tower by Jan de Swart, an expressive interpretation of a historic form, unambiguously marks the mall as the new town square.

Today, the mall is the center of a fight over downtown Fresno’s redevelopment. The city government, with a $14 million federal transportation grant, supports plans to put a new complete street down the center of the mall. Preservationists plan to file a lawsuit to block the scheme. The rhetorical standoff between sides comes down to revive versus destroy, but the conditions on the ground tell a more complicated story about the role of design as a catalyst and a scapegoat in a changing urban landscape.

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BY FRED A. BERNSTEIN

Set-asides for women-owned firms are a paradox.  some can move you ahead. others are just a headache.

Set-asides for women-owned firms are a paradox. Some can move you ahead. Others are just a headache. Credit: Greeen/shutterstock.com

From the February 2015 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Andrea Cochran, FASLA, the San Francisco-based landscape architect, has received the Cooper Hewitt’s National Design Award, the ASLA Design Medal, and many other honors. But despite her prominence, she says, she still sees sexism affecting the profession. “It’s not overt, but it’s there,” says Cochran, explaining that it is precisely her success that makes her aware of the problem. “If you asked me when I was in my 20s if I had ever experienced sexism, I would have laughed at you,” she says. “But then you get to a certain point in your career and you realize there is a glass ceiling.” In her experience, “It’s still hard to get certain types of jobs, some of the bigger jobs, if you’re a woman.”

So Cochran supports programs that require prime contractors on public projects to award a percentage of the work to “women business enterprises,” or WBEs. “If being a WBE helps me get a job, that’s fine,” says Cochran, her voice rising, “because there are lots of other jobs I would have gotten if I were a guy.”

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BY KATHARINE LOGAN

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New design for Seattle’s Elliott Bay Seawall will include habitat for young salmon and a glass-floored promenade to allow light into the ocean.

From the July 2014 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Before Seattle grew up on its shores, Elliott Bay was a bluff-backed beach, with intertidal marshes and mudflats providing a complex and varied habitat for birds, fish, and marine invertebrates. Its sloping beaches offered salmon a safe passage through shallow waters, with plenty to eat along the way.

The growth of Seattle changed that. The developing city filled and leveled its waterfront behind a seawall built on densely spaced and creosote-blackened pilings. Deep, dark, and toxic, the urban shoreline repels migrating salmon out into the bay on a difficult journey where they become easy prey for other fish and marine mammals.

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Cool relief from dull summer reading is here! The mid-summer issue of LAM focuses on the surprising history and ongoing threat posed to the storied town of Zoar, Ohio, by a 1930s levee; the public spirit of Máximapark designed by West 8, near Utrecht in the Netherlands; and Cliff Garten’s artistic take on civic infrastructure. Elsewhere, we look at city policies on urban farming; the planting designs of Richard Shaw in the harsh, arid highlands of Colorado; the strange relationship between the western fence lizard and the pesky black-legged tick; and a design by James Corner Field Operations on the Seattle waterfront meant to aid in the protection of the Pacific salmon. Kim Sorvig takes on Owning the Earth: The Transforming History of Land Ownership, by Andro Linklater, in Books, and Rachel Sussman shares a portfolio of her work from the instant cult favorite, The Oldest Living Things on Earth, in the Back. And of course, there’s more in our regular Books, Species, and Goods columns. Best of all, the July issue is FREE and easy (see below) for you this season.

You can read the full table of contents for July 2014 or pick up a free digital issue of the July LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating some July pieces as the month rolls out.

Credits: Redesign of Santo Domingo Riverside Neighborhood: INCONSERCA and Ana Báez Sarita; Planting Palette: D. A. Horchner; Ribbons: Jeremy Green; Seattle Seawall Detail: James Corner Field Operations; Zoar Levee: Ed Massery; Research Map: Jong Lee, Student ASLA; Bicyclists in Máximapark: Courtesy Johan De Boer—Vrienden Van Máximapark; Western Fence Lizard: Cary Bass/Wikimedia Commons.

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Welcome to February! Seasonal affective disorder, the malady common to this month’s dreary days, can be treated by looking at Santa Monica’s newest public space, Tongva Park, by James Corner Field Operations, on the cover of this month’s LAM. (For the cure, you will have to make your way to the park itself.) In Queens, a new waterfront park is built tough to take the threat of flooding head-on at Hunter’s Point South, designed by Thomas Balsley Associates and Weiss/Manfredi. A new homeless shelter in Portland, Oregon, has an excellent courtyard designed by Mayer/Reed specifically to encourage people in need to come inside for help. Along with the regular features in Goods, Books, and Species, the Now section features stories on reclaiming urban alleys and forums for urban design addicts, and Peter Harnik and Ryan Donahue of the Trust for Public Land examine why it’s so hard to get a new park built in the San Francisco Bay area. You can read the full table of contents for February here or preview the digital issue of the February LAM here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes and Noble. You can also purchase single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Follow the the LAM blog, Facebook page,  and Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating some of the February issue as the month rolls out.

Credits: Mission Creek Sports Court, Courtesy Ming Deng, Marta Fry Landscape Architects; Green Roof Bed Layers: Materials Assembly, Courtesy Gritlab; Tongva Park, Tim Street-Porter; Mesquite Trees, Adam Barbe, ASLA/Courtesy Ten Eyck Landscape Architects; Hunter’s Point South, Wade Zimmerman; Bud Clark Commons Plant Palette, Courtesy Mayer/Reed.

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