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Posts Tagged ‘Larry Weaner’

BY ZACH MORTICE

Ten years ago, this landscape was mowed turf. Photo by Larry Weaner, Affiliate ASLA.

A long-running workshop on native landscapes will move online for the first time.

 

Foraging for wild ramps to sauté, collecting and sprinkling seeds over a fallow field, watching how annual nurse plants and slower-growing perennials advance and retreat as a native meadow matures. They’re all ideal landscape experiences for the COVID-19 era: remote, contemplative, and socially distant. They’re also squarely in the wheelhouse of Larry Weaner, Affiliate ASLA, and the organization he started 30 years ago, New Directions in the American Landscape (NDAL). Weaner is a highly sought-after meadow designer, and NDAL is an education and ecological design nonprofit that emphasizes native landscapes and minimal maintenance practices. This spring and summer, NDAL will be bringing its long-running workshops online for the first time.

Weaner views designed landscapes and meadows as continually evolving layers of proliferation and withdrawal among native species, where maintenance can be kept to a minimum. These online seminars, which NDAL typically holds twice a year, are rough translations of the “very intensive native design workshops that go into all aspects of integrating ecological restoration into garden design,” Weaner says. But with the need for social distancing and the move online, Weaner elected to host shorter presentations for landscape professionals, and has programmed separate sessions for general audiences. (more…)

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Our much-awaited 2015 LAM Product Directory is packed into the December issue,  which is free to read through Zinio. In addition to the largest-ever Product Directory, December includes a profile of the work of Larry Weaner, Affiliate ASLA, aka the “meadow guy”; Wagner Hodgson’s  new campus addition to Salem State University, a winner of a 2014 Honor Award in General Design; and the imminent threat to Garrett Eckbo’s iconic design for the Fulton Mall in Fresno, California.

Elsewhere, new peer-reviewed specifications for planting by Brian Kempf, Tyson Carroll, and James Urban, FASLA, adapt modern practices and contemporary science that can be altered for any region. In House Call, Nancy Owens Studio creates a design in upstate New York for an old friend. And in the Back, we have a look at amazing botanical illustrations from the pages of Flora Illustrata: Great Works from the LuEsther T. Mertz Library of the New York Botanical Garden. And, of course, there’s more in our regular Books, Species, and Goods columns.

You can read the full table of contents for December 2014 or pick up a free digital issue of the December LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single back issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating December articles as the month rolls on.

Credits: “If He Does Nothing, What Will Happen?” Larry Weaner Landscape Associates; “The Tilted Quad,” Jim Westphalen; “Fresno v. Eckbo,” photo courtesy Garrett Eckbo Collection, Environmental Design Archives, University of California, Berkeley; “Plant It Right,” Courtesy Urban Tree Foundation; “Dissolved at the Edges,” Michael Moran/OTTO; “Cabinet of Curiosities,” The LuEsther T. Mertz Library of the New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York.

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