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Posts Tagged ‘Martin Smith’

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Photo by Timothy A. Schuler.

From “The Bridge Builder” by Timothy Schuler in the November 2021 issue, about fourth-generation Arkansas Delta native Martin Smith, whose vision of an outdoor recreation-led reinvigoration of the delta is becoming a career-defining capstone.

“Family roots.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 250 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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On the Cover: Students perch on an overlook at the Tennessee River.

“When Stars Align,” by Jared Brey. Thanks to years of work by students and faculty from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s School of Landscape Architecture, the 652-mile trail known as the Tennessee RiverLine has grown from a sparky idea to a full-fledged proposal. It is poised to be part of the region’s next era of people-centered infrastructure.

Also in the issue:
Russell + Mills Studios designs a riverfront for New Belgium Brewing Company in Asheville, North Carolina. | Landscape architect Martin Smith’s vision for revitalizing the Arkansas Delta has grown from passion project to a force for change. | Fallen Sky lands at Storm King Art Center. | Knoxville’s storied Loghaven re-emerges as an artists’ haven. | Seferian Design Group finds a material balance along Lake Ontario. | Carbon counting for city services in Reno, Nevada. | The High Line Canal is a vision for a 71-mile irrigation canal that runs along Denver’s eastern edge. | Goods features new exhibitors at ASLA’s EXPO in Nashville. | Three designers from SCAPE Studio reflect on Hurricane Ida. | A review of Site Matters: Strategies for Uncertainty Through Planning and Design, edited by Andrea Kahn and Carol J. Burns. | Seeking a way to translate wildfire risk in Lake Tahoe, a landscape artist lets the trees talk. 

 

Online this month from the November issue:

“Better Edges for Eels” by Timothy A. Schuler on November 2. On a living shoreline in Ontario, Canada, Seferian Design Group is designing to counteract erosion and provide a habitat for endangered species.

“Home Brewed” by Brian Barth on November 11. A connection with New Belgium Brewing Company led to a chance for Russell + Mills Studios to design the landscape for a brewery in Asheville, North Carolina.

“When Stars Align” by Jared Brey on November 18. A student project to connect people and public lands along a 652-mile river trail gathers steam. English and Spanish.

“High Profile” by Haniya Rae on November 30. The transformation of an irrigation canal east of Denver shows off the region’s diversity.

The full table of contents for November can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 250 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting November articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: Cover, photo by Tennessee River Studio; “The Bridge Builder,” Timothy Hursley; “When Stars Align,” Tennessee River Studio; “Home Brewed,” Mark Herboth Photography, LLC; “High Profile,” Evan Anderman.

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