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Posts Tagged ‘memorial’

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Photo by Tina Chee, ASLA.

From “A Memorial for the Moment” by Timothy Schuler in the April 2021 issue, about a mass shooting memorial in Tucson, Arizona, by Chee Salette and the visual artist Rebeca Méndez that’s redefining the city’s main civic axis.

“Home amongst the stones.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

You can read the full table of contents for April 2021 or pick up a free digital issue of the April LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 250 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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BY BRIAN FRYER

The Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Nation moves closer to permanently memorializing historic injury in Idaho.

FROM THE FEBRUARY 2021 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

 

For centuries, it was tradition each January for several thousand members of the nomadic Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Nation to gather at a bend in the Bear River near the borders of Idaho and Utah. Tribal leader Darren Parry says the Shoshone called the place Boa Ogoi. Bands of the tribe would share stories, use the natural hot springs, and perform the “warm dance” to hasten the coming of spring.

In the mid-1800s, as more settlers came to the area now known as Cache Valley, there were intermittent conflicts with the Indigenous people there. On January 29, 1863, a detachment of the U.S. Army Cavalry attacked a group of Shoshone that had remained at Boa Ogoi after the annual gathering, killing nearly 400 men, women, and children in one of the largest mass murders of Native Americans in the United States. (more…)

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BY MICHAEL DUMIAK

Trees in the landscape around Ypres, in Belgium, mark stubborn boundaries of the first World War.

FROM THE MARCH 2019 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

 

Off the Menin Road in Flanders, Belgium, there is a lane leading to a working farm and a stand of trees. This copse is called Railway Wood.

On a raw day in early spring, the wind runs through the wood over the adjoining field, rustling the leaves of a slight elm sapling at the side of the lane. The elm is protected by a steel frame, and it is marked with a red-trimmed sign. The tree stands in a spot that looked very different once upon a time, from June 1915 to July 1917. At that point there were no trees, none with leaves, or branches, or tops, anyway, and this place was called the Idiot Trench. (more…)

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Photo courtesy Yannick Milpas for Omgeving.

From “Tree Line” in the March 2019 issue by Michael Dumiak, about the Remembrance Trees marking a World War I memorial.

“The Bluff overlooks what was once no-man’s-land—the neutral land between German and Allied forces in World War I.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 250 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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FOREGROUND

Sugar Substitutes (Preservation)
Reed Hilderbrand rethinks Storm King Art Center’s venerable Maple Allée.

Free Markets (Food)
Atlanta’s Browns Mill Food Forest will be a place for the community to gather,
as well as gather food.

FEATURES

Giant Steps
Mithun has made Yosemite’s Mariposa Grove a better experience for visitors as well as for its spectacular sequoias.

Taking the Wind Out of Wildfire
Ashland, Oregon’s new wildfire mitigation project could serve as a model for communities throughout the West.

Tree Line
In Ypres, Belgium, trees grow as living memorials to World War I dead.

All this plus the regular Now and Goods columns. The full table of contents for March can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 250 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting March articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Taking the Wind Out of Wildfire,” City of Ashland; “Giant Steps,” Christian Runge, ASLA; “Tree Line,” The National Archives, Kew, Ordnance Survey/Wikimedia Commons; “Free Markets,” Office of Resilience, City of Atlanta; “Sugar Substitutes,” © Courtesy Storm King Art Center/Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson.

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Image by SWA.

 

From “The Making of a Memorial” in the February 2019 issue by Timothy A. Schuler, about a memorial by Dan Affleck, ASLA, and Ben Waldo, Associate ASLA, commemorating the Sandy Hook Elementary School mass shooting.

“The ‘sacred sycamore’ at the Sandy Hook memorial.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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BY BRADFORD MCKEE

A quirky nook at UC Berkeley memorializes Bill Callaway in style.

FROM THE MAY 2018 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

Peter Walker, FASLA, has thought quite a lot about memorial design. With Michael Arad, he completed the World Trade Center Memorial in Lower Manhattan, which opened in 2011. But a more recent call about a memorial commission was quite personal. It came from Jennifer Wolch, the dean of the College of Environmental Design at the University of California, Berkeley, near where Walker has his firm, PWP Landscape Architecture. She wanted to create a memorial within the school’s Wurster Hall to William Byrd Callaway, known to his friends as Bill. Callaway, who died in 2014 at the age of 71, joined Walker at SWA in 1967 and eventually became its CEO—and a legend to his colleagues.

Wolch “had quite an interesting space, but it was really ugly,” Walker said. “Everyone just threw stuff in it.” The space is a two-story light well for which no use was specified when the building opened in 1964. Faculty members at that time debated its best use but couldn’t agree on what that would be. “The decision was made to put all plans on the back burner,” Wolch said. “For 52 years.” (more…)

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