Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘New at HQ’

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Placing Martha Schwartz, FASLA, the past decade has been tricky to folks in the U.S. She has been teaching here, but otherwise has been anywhere else, working away. Now Schwartz has moved back to New York and says she wants to reconnect with her home ground. James Trulove talks with Schwartz in the July LAM about her practice and teaching, a focus on climate hazards, and recent work in China, where Trulove visited two projects in Beijing.

Liz Sargent, FASLA, doesn’t have a slick website or a press packet, but chances are you’ve probably been to one of the cultural landscapes she’s worked on, including nine U.S. World Heritage sites, 33 National Historic Landmarks, and more than 50 National Park Service sites. Kevan Williams takes a deep dive into her work documenting the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Being online means consenting to leaving a trail of personal data wherever we go, but what does consent mean when you’re in public space? Data-tracking furniture in our parks and cities can have a lot of community benefits, but is the technology way ahead of the privacy conversation? Brian Barth looks into the systems that are looking into us.

Also in this issue: podcasts for designers, not just about them; Meg Calkins, FASLA, on new sustainable concrete products; and just in time for your summer road trip, Jane Gillette reviews landscape architect Jack Williams’s Easy On, Easy Off: The Urban Pathology of America’s Small Towns, a book about how highways helped shape the country. The full table of contents for July can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting July articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Disrupting the Park Bench,” Melissa Gaston; “Context Clues,” Liz Sargent, FASLA; “Martha Schwartz, Reconnecting,” Sahar Coston-Hardy; “Concrete Minus Carbon,” Chicago Department of Transportation; “Reopened for Business,” EPNAC.COM; “Pictures in Sound,” Courtesy Mark Morris, ASLA.

Read Full Post »

Credit: ASLA 2016 Professional General Design Honor Award. Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park. Ramboll Studio Dreiseitl / Lim Shiang Han.

Credit: ASLA 2016 Professional General Design Honor Award. Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park. Ramboll Studio Dreiseitl / Lim Shiang Han.

 

Resilience is a word that has become fixed in the lexicon of landscape architecture, and for good reason. Resilience means, among other things, protecting the 80 percent of the world’s population living near a coast from the onslaught of natural disasters and climate change—and there are rising hazards inland, too. It also brings increasing equity to the valuable roles of landscape architects. There’s a ton of information out there on how communities can become more resilient. To help navigate it, ASLA recently released Resilient Design, a web guide that documents the importance of focusing on resilience (for the human and nonhuman worlds) and offers case studies organized into six general areas to show adaptations that try to anticipate the worst of circumstances. The guide, which was reviewed by several professionals deeply involved in resilience issues, emphasizes layered defenses rather than “heavy-handed infrastructure projects.”

Read Full Post »

Trees-For-Bees-2016-Poster

This year’s official National Pollinator Week poster. Credit: Pollinator Partnership, artist Natalya Zahn.

This is National Pollinator Week, held every year to call attention to the imperiled state of bees, butterflies, birds, and bats, and their pivotal role in the environment and the food web.  Throughout the week, organizations around the country will host events and talks on the problems facing pollinators and possible steps for their future health. There’s a pollinator tour in Caldwell, Idaho; a Discovery Day at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum in Atlanta; Beekeeping for Beginners at Timberline Farm in Belleview, Florida, and much more, all of which can be found on this map hosted on the Pollinator Partnership’s website. There’s also a gathering here at ASLA on Thursday, June 23 to mark the occasion. There are, after all, 200,000 species of pollinators.

On Thursday, June 23 at 10:30 a.m. Eastern, Keith Robinson, the lead landscape architect at the California Department of Transportation, will represent ASLA at a congressional briefing titled “Highways to Habitats: Enhancing Pollinator Forage Areas” to discuss pollinator health and conservation actions with members of the Congressional Pollinator Protection Caucus.

The Pollinator Partnership website is a great resource throughout the year; it has many ways in which to get involved in the protection of our pollinators, including native planting palettes searchable by region. For more information about National Pollinator Week and events near you, please visit www.pollinator.org.

 

Read Full Post »

Citizen scientists and experts work to catalogue and identify as many species as possible during the BioBlitz event.

Species experts and families work to identify and catalog as many species as possible during the BioBlitz event.

Since 2007, the National Park Service (NPS) and the National Geographic Society have teamed up to create BioBlitz, an annual event that celebrates the wealth of biodiversity in the United States. Each year, thousands of families sign up to search for and learn about different species of plants, animals, and fungi, among others, in various national parks across the country.

For the centenary year of the NPS, BioBlitz 2016 will be held at Constitution Gardens on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., where ASLA joins a variety of organizations at the Biodiversity Festival to speak on the importance of soil quality and health. “This is a great opportunity to reach out to potentially thousands of families and let them know what landscape architects do,” says Karen Grajales, the manager of public relations for ASLA, who will be joining Virginia Tech landscape architecture students and other ASLA staff members for the event.

To learn more about BioBlitz and potentially get involved, please click here.

Read Full Post »

WLAM2016-1

Every April is World Landscape Architecture Month (WLAM), when students and professionals from around the world work to promote the best of what landscape architecture has to offer. Born from the need for public outreach for the profession, the celebration quickly evolved from a national to an international platform, and has since created a greater appreciation for landscape architecture through social media and networking.

To build on the success of last year, the April subscriber’s print edition of Landscape Architecture Magazine comes with cutout cards reading “This Is Landscape Architecture” to take pictures with that favorite landscape and share on social media using the hashtag #WLAM2016. And this month’s digital issue of LAM is free in celebration of WLAM to share with friends, coworkers, and the odd family member who still thinks landscape architects mow lawns.

For more information on World Landscape Architecture Month and how to get involved, please visit here.

Read Full Post »

 

The demolition of the interior of ASLA’s headquarters has finally gotten under way, marking a major first step in creating the ASLA Center for Landscape Architecture in the heart of Washington, D.C. Members of ASLA’s executive committee and staff joined in knocking down the first wall, with President Chad Danos, FASLA, taking the inaugural first swing. Demolition continues until late March when construction will begin.

The renovation, designed by Gensler and Oehme, van Sweden, is expected to continue through late summer. Pledges contributing to the project have reached 66 percent of the $1.5 million goal, and continue to grow through the generosity of members and many other friends of the Society. For more information, and to donate, visit cla.asla.org.

Read Full Post »

LAM_Oct15_Cover

Whether you’re a professional working on a downtown plaza or a student hoping to shape the future landscape, it’s time to show off your finest work. ASLA is now accepting submissions for its 2016 Professional and Student Awards. Professionals have until March 18 to submit their work, and students have until May 13 (yes, that’s after semester’s end, we hope).

As ever, the competition will be tough, but the opportunity for recognition is well worth the time and effort in submitting. “It’s an honor to be selected by your peers from among hundreds of submissions as one of the best in landscape architecture from around the globe,” says Carolyn Mitchell, ASLA’s Honors & Awards Coordinator.

Once selected, winners will be featured in the annual awards issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine and at the 2016 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO, held this year in New Orleans, October 21-24, 2016.

For more information, please click here.

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »