Posts Tagged ‘New at HQ’

LAM_Oct15_Cover

Whether you’re a professional working on a downtown plaza or a student hoping to shape the future landscape, it’s time to show off your finest work. ASLA is now accepting submissions for its 2016 Professional and Student Awards. Professionals have until March 18 to submit their work, and students have until May 13 (yes, that’s after semester’s end, we hope).

As ever, the competition will be tough, but the opportunity for recognition is well worth the time and effort in submitting. “It’s an honor to be selected by your peers from among hundreds of submissions as one of the best in landscape architecture from around the globe,” says Carolyn Mitchell, ASLA’s Honors & Awards Coordinator.

Once selected, winners will be featured in the annual awards issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine and at the 2016 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO, held this year in New Orleans, October 21-24, 2016.

For more information, please click here.

 

Read Full Post »

BEDIT_Session_2016_IMG_1506

One of the many peer-led sessions from the 2015 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO held in Chicago.

Until January 28, ASLA is accepting session proposals for the 2016 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO, which will be held this year in New Orleans (yes, it is exciting) October 21–24.

The possibilities are broad. New topics, such as research into the mechanics behind a design, are always welcome to help push the knowledge discussion forward. But there is always an eager audience for familiar topics, says Emily O’Connor, the Education Programs Administrator at ASLA. “Residential design and sustainable development have been popular sessions in past meetings,” O’Connor says. But time is running out. Refine your topic, round up any other panelists you might invite, and get your proposal in!

For more information, please visit here.

Read Full Post »

Researchers will be paid an honorarium of $2500 if their work is accepted forthe LATIS series.  Credit: ASLA

Researchers will be paid an honorarium of $2,500 if their work is accepted for the LATIS series. Credit: ASLA.

Solid peer-reviewed research in new landscape practice areas is highly valuable and not always easy to find, and that’s why LATIS (Landscape Architecture Technical Information Series) is such a terrific resource.

LATIS papers provide practicing landscape architects with peer-reviewed technical information about new and evolving practices and products and offer an economical way to earn the professional development hours (PDH) needed to meet state licensure requirements. This work is important to the growth of the field, and the production and distribution of this new research is supported by the ASLA Fund with $2,500 honoraria for accepted papers and free access to LATIS papers for ASLA members (a $50 fee applies for nonmembers). The papers are accompanied by a 10- to 15-question test you give yourself, through which practitioners can earn LA CES approved PDH for an additional fee.

If you are pioneering a new practice area or are successfully using an innovative technique, publicizing your work through LATIS will help increase the fluency in new and developing topics within landscape architecture. Authors of all papers are carefully selected by ASLA, and all papers are subject to a blind review process. ASLA is now accepting proposals for the 2015–2016 LATIS cycle, and accepted LATIS authors will be offered honoraria of $2,500 for their work.

If you’re interested, email Shawn Balon, ASLA, the Professional Practice Manager, at sbalon@asla.org for additional information. Responses to the LATIS Call for Abstracts must be received by COB on Friday, August 14, 2015, to be considered for the 2015–2016 LATIS publications.

Read Full Post »

United States Capitol dome under restoration. Photo Architect of the Capitol

United States Capitol dome under restoration. Photo Architect of the Capitol

A monthly bit of headline news from ASLA’s national office.

It’s April, which at ASLA headquarters in Washington means that Advocacy Day is nigh—Thursday, April 23. Every year around this time, hundreds of ASLA members come to town ahead of the midyear meetings of the Society’s Board of Trustees and Chapter Presidents Council to spend a day on Capitol Hill visiting the offices of their senators and representatives to make the case for national issues that are important to landscape architects.

This year, the focus of advocacy efforts is on three issues: the reauthorization and full funding of the Transportation Alternatives Program and the Land and Water Conservation Fund, and the authorization and funding (at $100 million) of the National Park Service Centennial Challenge. Advocacy Day is about showing strength in numbers. But the individual work of telling Congress what landscape architects do and why it matters never stops—especially because design in the public realm helps create new jobs, stimulate consumer spending, increase property values, and, in turn, generate billions in new federal, state, and local tax revenues. Even design professionals not planning to take part in Advocacy Day activities should stay aware of how these issues are moving, or not, in Washington, and keep in touch with the members and staff of their congressional delegations.

Each day, Roxanne Blackwell, Mark Cason, and Leighton Yates of ASLA’s government affairs staff work with legislators on issues of importance to the profession, and you should follow them on Twitter at @ASLA_Advocacy. But members of Congress really sit up and listen to the concerns of individual constituents and business owners. To help acquaint you with ways to communicate with Congress, the government affairs staff will hold a webinar tomorrow, April 9, from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m. Eastern. You can register to join the webinar here. Questions? ASLA’s government affairs staff is happy to help. Contact the director of federal government affairs, Roxanne Blackwell, at rblackwell@asla.org.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts

%d bloggers like this: