Posts Tagged ‘North Carolina’

BY KOFI BOONE, ASLA

A civic hydrology park emerges on Duke University’s campus.

FROM THE DECEMBER 2019 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

Having lived in Durham, North Carolina, for more than a decade, I’ve come to realize that it’s almost impossible to discuss Durham without referencing Duke University, and vice versa. Duke is a private university, and its West Campus, although in the city, stands apart and within Duke Forest, a vast patch of woods created through a component of a century-old Olmsted Brothers master plan. The campus landscapes cultivated by Duke offer a stark experiential contrast to the eclectic environmental qualities of a rapidly suburbanizing region. Duke’s campus is a big draw for wedding receptions, picnics, walking and biking, and the occasional respite from nearby urban life. Durhamites regularly use the campus as an extended city park system. I’ve visited Duke’s landscapes many times with family and students in search of memorable settings in an educational environment.

Duke Pond, one of the newest campus landscapes, has been an increasingly popular attraction. On a recent visit to Duke Pond with my daughter, she waded into shallow water to scoop up a tadpole and said, “This place is kinda scruffy, but I like it!” When I relayed this story to Warren T. Byrd Jr., FASLA, the renowned landscape architect who concluded his career at Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects with this project, he laughed. He was thrilled that younger generations felt comfortable engaging the landscape directly. Enabling the informal discovery of ecology was what he had in mind. On a campus populated with works by many leading landscape architects, most of them manicured and tightly controlled, the pond offers an example of a different aesthetic as well as the roles landscape can play in exciting the next generation about environmental stewardship. (more…)

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Image courtesy Waterkeeper Alliance.

From “Hog-Tied” in the May 2019 issue by Timothy Schuler, about how industrial-scale livestock operations are degrading and polluting farming communities in eastern North Carolina.

“Pandora’s Box aerial.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 250 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

In North Carolina, history, industry, and climate change work in tandem to create landscapes of toxic waste.

FROM THE MAY 2019 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

In Houston, it was the petrochemical plants. In North Carolina, it was the hog farms. In both places, churning floodwaters caused by recent storms were turned into a toxic stew that endangered local water resources and public health. In September 2018, Hurricane Florence made landfall in North Carolina, where seven million gallons of hog waste overtopped the region’s ubiquitous open-air lagoons and quickly made its way into neighbors’ yards and nearby streams.

As by-products go, the fecal sludge of an industrial-scale hog farm is far from benign. The waste can carry viruses, parasites, nitrates, and bacteria such as salmonella. Even in the best circumstances, the odors from these open-air lagoons, which number some 3,300 across the state but are concentrated in the heavily African American counties of eastern North Carolina, are noxious enough that in August 2018 a jury awarded six families $473.5 million for having to live near a hog farm in Pender County. Combined with a severe storm, however, these lagoons become all the more dangerous, threatening the water supply of entire communities and far-flung ecosystems.

Hurricane Florence was just the most recent example of how severe weather events, strengthened by a warming climate, can interact with industrialized landscapes to create new threats to public health and safety. If landscape architects are to grapple with the environmental and human health impacts of climate change, they will have to educate themselves about agricultural waste. (more…)

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It’s the first, which means March’s issue of LAM is here! You’ll find these stories inside:

FOREGROUND

The Tiny Menace (Ecology)
The shot hole borer is having a deadly impact on California’s trees.

Raleigh Finds Its Inner Self (Planning)
New plans for downtown in Raleigh, North Carolina, could help move the
sprawling city beyond its complicated past.

Mind, Soul, Design (Palette)
The landscapes of Virginia Burt, FASLA, are grounded in practicality.

FEATURES: GGN PORTFOLIO

Drawn Together
The pursuit of excellence is embedded in the culture of GGN.

The Streets Are Back
CityCenterDC restores a historic downtown grid that had vanished for years
beneath a convention center.

Promised Land
GGN’s landscape for the National Museum of African American History and Culture
is both leveling and welcoming.

 Extended View
For the University of Washington’s Lower Rainier Vista,
GGN finishes a job that John Charles Olmsted started.

All this plus the regular Now and Goods columns. The full table of contents for March can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting March articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “The Streets Are Back,” Catherine Tighe; “Promised Land,” Alan Karchmer/NMAAHC; “Extended View,” GGN; “Drawn Together,” GGN; “The Tiny Menace,” Courtesy the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens/Maxx Echt; “Mind, Soul, Design,” Richard Mandelkorn; “Raleigh Finds Its Inner Self,” City of Raleigh.

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BY BRIAN BARTH

Cities are getting “smarter.” But are they getting wiser?

FROM THE JULY 2017 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

“Oh, no. My phone is dead. Better head to the park.”

Walk past the basketball court down at Anita Stroud Park, toward the little creek below, and you might find a gaggle of teens clustered around a very modern-looking bench that would seem more at home outside a coffee shop in Soho than in a tiny neighborhood park next to I-77 on the north end of Charlotte, North Carolina.

A pair of USB ports on a console on the front of the bench provides juice from the solar panel mounted at lap level between the seats. Who wouldn’t want to hang out at a bench like this? It certainly catches the eye of passersby. What these kids might not realize, however, is that this bench is watching them back. Underneath that solar panel is a small Wi-Fi enabled sensor that sends data back to an office building in East Cambridge, Massachusetts. Anyone who passes within 150 feet of the bench with a Wi-Fi enabled mobile device in their pocket is picked up by the sensor and (more…)

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Credit: Andy Stephenson [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Credit: Andy Stephenson [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Find the LAM staff out and about in May and June:

May 6–7

Dumbarton Oaks Garden and Landscape Studies Symposium, Washington, D.C.

June 1–4

2016 Vernacular Architecture Forum, Durham, North Carolina

June 10–11

2016 Summit on Landscape Architecture and the Future, Philadelphia

June 13–19

Dredgefest California, Berkeley, California

June 21–23

A Century of Design in the Parks, Santa Fe, New Mexico

You can also find Landscape Architecture Magazine this spring at the following shows:

May 19–21

AIA Convention 2016, Philadelphia

And, as always, at more than 200 Barnes & Noble stores nationwide.

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LAMJan16NPS1

From January’s issue: LAM goes to the extremes in celebration of the National Park Service’s centennial.

From the January 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

On August 26, Americans will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. Members and friends of ASLA can feel especially proud, as the society, along with the American Civic Association, was instrumental in the passage of the National Park Service Organic Act, which established the agency, in 1916. Today there are 59 national parks, sublime wedges of paradise where time seems to stand still. To begin the centenary year at LAM, we’ve gone to extremes to find parks with superlative qualities as a reminder of the awe the parks inspire. (more…)

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