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Posts Tagged ‘NPS’

BY BRAULIO AGNESE

Art by Katarina Katsma, ASLA. Photo courtesy By Shenandoah National Park from Virginia [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Photo illustration by Katarina Katsma, ASLA. Photo courtesy Shenandoah National Park from Virginia [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

On Dec. 28, 2016, then-National Park Service Director Jonathan Jarvis signed “Director’s Order #21: Donations and Philanthropic Partnerships,” the latest update to the agency’s guidance on engagement in public–private partnerships and the appropriate acceptance of support from the private sector. Originally issued in 1998 and then revised in 2006 and 2008, the directive’s newest version received backlash from several quarters after the NPS released a draft version for a 45-day public comment period in late March 2016. (Jarvis retired from the NPS on Jan. 3, 2017. Michael Reynolds, former deputy director of operations, is serving as acting director until a permanent appointee is named.)

The draft generated a strong negative response from preservation groups, government-focused nonprofits, and corporate watchdogs, which pointed out the greatly expanded possibilities for corporate visuals (such as wraps on NPS vehicles), warned of logos on national treasures, and expressed the worry that park managers would become active solicitors for commercial sponsorships. Scenic America, devoted to preserving the “visual character of America,” partnered with Public Citizen’s Commercial Alert, a nonpartisan, nonprofit initiative for keeping “commercial culture within its proper sphere,” to spread the word about the draft. The NPS received 350 comments on the directive, 80 percent of which were negative, Commercial Alert estimated in a September letter.

In its press release announcing the finalization of the order, the NPS notes that the revised order arose from a desire to “better align the bureau with (more…)

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BY TOM STOELKER

At Paterson Great Falls, one of the newer national parks, Americans made many things, including history.

At Paterson Great Falls, one of the newer national parks, Americans made many things, including history.

From the August 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Paterson, New Jersey, is a tough town. Gang violence is prevalent, teachers are being laid off, and about 30 percent of the city’s residents live in poverty. But the city’s got soul. On Market Street, the lively main thoroughfare, bachata music spills from 99-cent stores, and the scent of Peruvian food wafts through the air. Paterson has been a magnet for immigration since the 19th century, and the reason why is found nearby. Twenty minutes from the center of town is the Great Falls, now part of Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park, where the Passaic River makes a majestic drop of 77 feet off basalt rock cliffs before it continues its twisted path. These are the falls that made Paterson.

In 1778, Alexander Hamilton, General George Washington’s aide-de-camp, recognized the river’s potential to harness power for both manufacturing and geopolitics. Hamilton understood the young nation needed to grow its industry to be independent of Europe. Through a group he helped form in 1791, the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures (SUM), Hamilton chose Paterson as the site of the nation’s first planned manufacturing development.

Gianfranco Archimede, who today directs Paterson’s Historic Preservation Commission, said: “At the end of the war, the king essentially said, (more…)

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Credit: Sahar Coston-Hardy.

Credit: Sahar Coston-Hardy.

From “Industrial Evolution” by Tom Stoelker, in the August 2016 issue, featuring the National Park Service’s management plan to unite industrial history with natural beauty at the Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park in Paterson, New Jersey.

“A view above and below.”

—Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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BY JONATHAN LERNER

When everyone wants a piece of the same postcard.

When everyone wants a piece of the same postcard.

From the August 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Mather Point, a limestone fin that juts into Grand Canyon National Park, is the first overlook from which many, possibly most, visitors to the storied national park get a glimpse into that astonishing other world. In the middle of a short flight of steps down from the rim to the overlook sits a pair of large boulders. There’s often an informal queue at that spot. Every day hundreds, maybe thousands, of people wait to clamber up and have their pictures taken. Shot from below and elevated by the rock above the crowd, people appear to float before the geological fever dream of the canyon. Invariably, they spread their arms wide, like wings. These portraits make an allusion to flight—and an illusion of solitude.

A redesign of the access to Mather Point for cars and pedestrians, and of the park’s nearby main visitor center, was completed in 2012. It more than doubled the parking capacity. But attendance at national parks has soared since then, and already these new facilities are frequently overwhelmed. For the National Park Service system as a whole, between 2012 and 2015, recreational visits were up nearly 9 percent. For national parks in the Intermountain Region, attendance rose (more…)

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Along with the rest of the country this month, LAM is celebrating the centenary of the National Park Service. Our particular franchise on pride in the park service is that ASLA, which publishes LAM, can claim a good deal of paternity in its creation, as detailed in our April issue. A hundred years later, we travel to a couple of the most famous parks, Grand Canyon and Grand Teton, to look at the challenges that landscape architects encounter in keeping these treasured assets balanced between their wild popularity and fragile ecologies. We visit one of the newer national parks, the Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park in New Jersey, to look at how geological beauty and an industrial legacy fit together in an urbanized setting. Looking back at the Mission 66 design program of the mid-20th century, we discover the tensions the park service has in preserving a certain zeitgeist, in which some auto-centric features, in particular, are not universally loved.

There is a lot of other great stuff in this issue: Three landscape architecture firm principals share their approaches to requests for proposals or qualifications by clients, in Office. A report on a new vision for the beleaguered Westside, long an African American stronghold in Las Vegas, finds a mix of hope and anxiety for residents, in Planning. If you want to master a not-even-a-footprint ethos on public lands, ask the Burning Man festival organizers how it’s done. And this month’s book review is about Beyond the City: Resource Extraction Urbanism in South America, by Felipe Correa. And don’t miss our regular Now, Species, and Goods columns. The full table of contents for August can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating August articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Surge Time,” National Park Service/Michael Quinn; “Industrial Evolution,” Sahar Coston-Hardy; “Hit Delete,” Hershberger Design; “Wild Rides,” National Park Service, Yosemite Research Library; “Mind Your RFPs and Qs,” Big Muddy Workshop; “Wary of Change,” Kirsten Clarke Photography; “Mission 66 Hits 50,” Google Earth; “Vanishing Act,” Andrew Miller.

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Credit: South Mountain Partnership.

Credit: South Mountain Partnership.

From “The Greater Margins” by Daniel Howe, FASLA, in the May 2016 issue, featuring conservation efforts along the 2,189-mile Appalachian Trail.

“Show and tell!”

—Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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Citizen scientists and experts work to catalogue and identify as many species as possible during the BioBlitz event.

Species experts and families work to identify and catalog as many species as possible during the BioBlitz event.

Since 2007, the National Park Service (NPS) and the National Geographic Society have teamed up to create BioBlitz, an annual event that celebrates the wealth of biodiversity in the United States. Each year, thousands of families sign up to search for and learn about different species of plants, animals, and fungi, among others, in various national parks across the country.

For the centenary year of the NPS, BioBlitz 2016 will be held at Constitution Gardens on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., where ASLA joins a variety of organizations at the Biodiversity Festival to speak on the importance of soil quality and health. “This is a great opportunity to reach out to potentially thousands of families and let them know what landscape architects do,” says Karen Grajales, the manager of public relations for ASLA, who will be joining Virginia Tech landscape architecture students and other ASLA staff members for the event.

To learn more about BioBlitz and potentially get involved, please click here.

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