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Posts Tagged ‘Public space’

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Photo by Iwan Baan, courtesy Diller Scofidio + Renfro.

From “Soft Power in Moscow” by Stephen Zacks in the April 2018 issue, about how an ambitious riverfront park has radically revised Russian notions of the public sphere.

“Russian rave.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

 

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BY STEPHEN ZACKS

An expansive park at the foot of the Kremlin helped drive a series of revolutionary improvements to the Russian capital.

FROM THE APRIL 2018 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE. 

At Zaryadye Park in central Moscow, a procession of Eurasian birch trees, grasses, and shrubs winds downhill from a glass-encrusted outdoor amphitheater that tops the new Philharmonic Hall, framing photogenic views of the candy-colored cupolas of Saint Basil’s Cathedral. The park’s verdant terrain folds onto the rooftops of five scalloped pavilions that shelter a botanical display, an educational center, a food court, and a screening room that plays an immersive 3-D film on Russian history. The park, which covers 32 acres, stretches to the edge of Red Square, and even adds 11 square feet to the square that was uncovered during excavation. The pavilions, with their vegetated roofs, and most of the park’s terrain sit atop a 430-car underground parking garage. To keep the whole landscape in place, a geocell soil-stabilization system rests on top, anchoring granite pavers on pedestrian pathways that stretch onto an arching, boomerang-shaped overlook that cantilevers and hovers over the Moskva River. Here visitors of all ages and groups compulsively photograph themselves against the backdrop of the Kremlin and the Kotelnicheskaya Embankment Building, one of the Stalinist high-rises that define Moscow’s skyline.

Zaryadye Park is an entertaining landscape intended as a spectacular place, a special attraction, and a free public space—a term that Russian architects agree had almost no precedent in the language before a series of convergences brought the park into being. (more…)

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As part of an ongoing effort to make content more accessible, LAM will be making select stories available to readers in Spanish. For a full list of translated articles, please click here.

Click above for a full PDF of the translated text with English text available below.

BY NATE BERG

FROM THE OCTOBER 2017 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

Among Southern California landscape architecture firms, Los Angeles-based Studio-MLA (formerly Mia Lehrer + Associates) is arguably highbrow. Known for public spaces like the 1,300-acre Orange County Great Park and Vista Hermosa Park in an underserved section of Los Angeles, and transformative master plans for infrastructuralized landscapes like the Los Angeles River and the Silver Lake Reservoir, the firm has a serious approach to the needs of Southern California and the services landscape architecture can provide. It’s complex, civic-minded work built out of decades of engagement in the community.

So it’s somewhat unexpected to see some of Studio-MLA’s recent work (more…)

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BY WENDY GILMARTIN

For the residents of L.A.’s Skid Row, public space is a priority.

For the residents of L.A.’s Skid Row, public space is a priority.

From the October 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine

Speed bumps and curbs that narrow the street to slow traffic. Safety zones for women and LGBTQ residents. Vegetable gardens with citrus trees. Drinking fountains, storage units, and cell phone charging stations. This isn’t a laundry list of community benefits in your local affluent suburb; it’s a wish list for the nation’s most concentrated homeless community in downtown Los Angeles: Skid Row.

Where just five years ago tents, shopping carts, and makeshift campsites lined the streets in this eastern portion of downtown, gleaming luxury condominiums now stand with a Whole Foods market and designer clothing boutiques at street level. Even more high-end stores are under construction in an area that already lacks open spaces and parks.

Skid Row, with 11,000 residents living in an area of roughly 50 city blocks, (more…)

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L to R: John Bela, Blaine Merker, Mayra Madriz, Matthew Lister, Julia D Day. Courtesy Gehl Studio.
L to R: John Bela, Blaine Merker, Mayra Madriz, Matthew Lister, Julia D. Day. Courtesy Gehl Studio.

BY JENNIFER COOPER

When you hear about mergers of design firms, it usually involves a global conglomerate swallowing up a smaller office to obtain local clients and staff. You seldom hear about two firms coming together simply out of mutual interests, but that is how the principals of Rebar, in San Francisco, and Gehl Architects, of Copenhagen, describe their new venture together. The new U.S. entity, Gehl Studio, will keep those offices and have a new one in New York.

In their San Francisco space in the Mission, John Bela, ASLA; Blaine Merker, ASLA, of Rebar; and Helle Søholt of Gehl Architects talked about the impetus for joining offices, which began in March. Søholt cofounded Gehl Architects in Copenhagen with Jan Gehl 14 years ago based on Gehl’s research on people and the ways they use public space. Together they have worked on projects around the world for cities and organizations such as the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank. Until recent years, the firm focused primarily on large-scale planning but saw the need to prove their concepts to governments and communities in urban projects, as they did so successfully with New York’s public plaza and street improvements.

(more…)

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Frontier Town: A Tent Camp for Children in the Urban Wild D MET Design (Elizabeth Skrisson and Joel Schmidt) in collaboration with Sarah Lapinski. Photo Credit:  David Lewinski

Frontier Town: A Tent Camp for Children in the Urban Wild. D MET Design (Elizabeth Skrisson and Joel Schmidt) in collaboration with Sarah Lapinski. Photo Credit: David Lewinski

There’s a lot going on in Detroit, despite what you might read in the papers, including quite a bit at the intersection of landscape architecture, urban art, and public space. The open call for the 2014 DLECTICITY competition caught our eye for its intriguing approach to activating Detroit’s sometimes beleaguered city streets.  This is the second year for the competition and we hear that multi-disciplinary teams of all kinds are forming now. Accepted projects are funded up to $2,500 and there are honorariums as well. The description from the website is below, and the deadline is March 31. For more info, see the DLECTRICITY competition’s website. 

DLECTRICITY is back and ready to see more of your work! For two electrifying nights in 2012, DLECTRICITY brought thousands of people into Midtown Detroit to experience 35 projects by local, national and international artists. 25 of those projects were selected from an open call. This fall, DLECTRICITY will again transform Midtown with site-specific installations of light, video, performance, interactive engineering and nonconformist architecture. From lasers to dance, robots to 3D mapping, we want to see what you create. We challenge you to animate historic buildings, turn streets into oceans – the city landscape is your canvas. Now is the chance to show Detroit, and the world, what you can do!

DLECTRICITY is looking for projects that will activate the outdoor, nighttime landscape of Midtown Detroit’s Woodward Corridor including:

+ Light art
+ Video art
+ 3D video mapping projects
+ Multimedia installations
+ Projects that use technology for interactivity and community engagement
+ Works that utilize mobile platforms (smartphones, tablets)
+ Performance (art, dance, theater, music)
+ Talks and workshops
+ Kid-friendly and/or educational
+ The unexpected

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