Posts Tagged ‘Rios Clementi Hale Studios’

BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

A new firm in L.A. thinks it’s time to turn up the volume on landscape architecture.

A new firm in L.A. thinks it’s time to turn up the volume on landscape architecture.

From the August 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Earlier this spring, Kelly Majewski, Affiliate ASLA, was one of more than 100 designers in Los Angeles who attended Design for Dignity, a one-day “congress” convened by the L.A. chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) to identify ways to alleviate the city’s homeless crisis. But for Majewski, a landscape designer, the takeaway may not have been what the organizers hoped. “I got asked by multiple architects, once they found out I did landscape architecture, what I was doing at this conference,” she says. “I heard it three times. Which just blows my mind.”

Majewski founded Superjacent, a new landscape architecture and urban design studio, with Tony Paradowski and Chris Torres in January 2016. And it’s interactions like those at the AIA conference that inspired (more…)

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A monthly roundup of the news, dispatches, and marginalia that caught our eye. In this month’s issue of the Queue, the staff wades through a myriad of headlines to find $2.4 billion might not be enough for New York City’s new green infrastructure, reads about gender and urban farming, and slows down to enjoy a dancing stoplight.

CATCHING UP WITH…

    • Frequent contributor Alex Ulam looks at the benefits of New York City’s plan to spend $2.4 billion on green infrastructure, including stormwater management in priority neighborhoods—but some wonder whether it reaches far enough.

FIELD STUDIES

    • With urban agriculture’s popularity on the rise, Michael Tortorello of The New York Times wonders why the majority of workers are female (and why it matters).
    • San Francisco’s new tax breaks for converting vacant lots into urban farms might not make sense when there’s a lack of affordable housing in the city.
    • D.C. residents are slowly shaping alleyways from dark corners of miscreant activity to vibrant social assets for the community—one alley at a time.
    • For every mile of road in Nashville and its county, there is only half a mile of sidewalks, according to the Tennessean. And the city’s new flat rate fee that allows developers to opt out of building sidewalks altogether isn’t going to help.
    • An Op-Ed in the New York Times says Colony Collapse Disorder is in the rear-view mirror, but it’s still too early to breathe a sigh of relief: The United States averages a 30 percent loss of our pollinator friends annually.

OUT AND ABOUT

DISTRACT ME FROM MY DEADLINE DEPT.

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