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Posts Tagged ‘San Diego’

Mikyoung Kim, FASLA, accepts the 2018 ASLA Design Medal. EPNAC.

Every year, ASLA presents a number of honors to individuals and groups for their service to the landscape architecture profession and its ideals in the public realm. They include the ASLA Medal, the highest honor conferred by the Society; the Jot D. Carpenter Teaching Medal, given to a distinguished educator; and the Landscape Architecture Firm Award, given to an office that has built a distinguished body of work. ASLA also bestows honorary membership to nonmembers nominated for their service to the profession. (more…)

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BY G. RYAN SMITH, ASLA

BEDIT_Fore_Streets FIN

Separated bicycle lanes are steadily increasing in number, though every design detail counts.

From the June 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

In cities across the country where newly striped bike lanes are seemingly rolling out by the week, separated bike lanes would seem to be the holy grail. By giving cyclists their very own part of the public realm, they practically embody the exceptionalist case for bicycle infrastructure—a demonstrable victory of cyclists over the potentially deadly hazards of motorists who will never learn to be more careful behind the wheel. But separated bicycle lanes, also called cycle tracks or green lanes, are a considerable investment. The price per linear foot of recent projects has run between $120 for simpler installations with flexible posts to $2,000 for elaborately integrated systems. If properly done, they can greatly enhance the active transportation metabolism of a city. If not done right, they can seem pointless.

Landscape architects are only getting started in the design of separated bicycle lanes, also known as cycle tracks or green lanes, but so is everyone else. There are 270 cycle tracks in the United States as of this year, up from 78 in 2011, according to the advocacy group People for Bikes. Cycle tracks are more common in Europe than in this country.

Cycle tracks have their fans and their skeptics, given their significant variations on (more…)

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Credit: Iain Thompson [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Find the LAM staff out and about in March and April:

March 23–26

2016 Conference of the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture, Salt Lake City

April 26–28

Lightfair International, San Diego

You can also find Landscape Architecture Magazine this spring at the following shows:

April 18–20

Coverings, Chicago

April 26–28

Lightfair International, San Diego

And as always, at more than 200 Barnes & Noble stores nationwide.

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In May’s issue of LAM, the current lack of supply of native plant species in the United States shortchanges the potential for a more diverse landscape; Catherine Seavitt Nordenson, ASLA, leads a team at City College of New York to combine landscape architecture, climate science, and urban planning for better coastal resilience; and in Japan, Studio on Site’s persistence for the use of trees in its designs reconnects the city with nature.

In the departments, the Boston Schoolyard Initiative helps transform urban schoolyards into learning oases; open expanses in Vancouver’s Oppenheimer Park, designed by space2place and McFarlane Biggar, allow the peaceful coexistence of both homeless and local residential users; and Spurlock Poirier’s benched plans for San Diego have the potential to create a healthy, green network throughout the downtown area. All this plus our regular Now, Species, Goods, and Books columns. The full table of contents for May can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating May articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “The Chain of Demand,” Courtesy the Pizzo Group; “The Storm We Don’t Know,” © 2015 Structures of Coastal Resilience, Jamaica Bay Team; “Trees For Tokyo,” Makoto Yoshida/Yoshida Photo Studio; “Just Add Nature,” Christian Phillips Photography; “Every Kinda People,” Courtesy space2place Design; “The Thin Green Lines,” Spurlock Poirier Landscape Architects and Joe Cordelle, Animate Digital Studio.

 

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