Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Shoemaker Green’

As part of an ongoing effort to make content more accessible, LAM will be making select stories available to readers in Spanish. For a full list of translated articles, please click here.

BY JARED BREY / PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAHAR COSTON-HARDY, AFFILIATE ASLA

FROM THE SEPTEMBER 2019 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

 

Darren Damone, ASLA, and Katharine Griffiths were standing on a boardwalk at Avalon Park & Preserve, in Stony Brook, New York, looking across the pond at a gang of cormorants loitering in the branches of a beech tree.

“They used to nest over here, and it was a disaster zone,” said Griffiths, the director of the preserve. “It used to smell like a bluefish factory. It was nasty. They did a lot of damage to the trees in this area.… That’s what happens. They strip the leaves to put in their nest, and then their guano is so acidic that it just burns everything. They’re kind of sloppy birds.”

It was a May morning, and the squealing songs of cardinals spilled out of the woods behind us. We took a curving path up a hill to a smaller pond, fed by what looked like an underground stream, and I asked, credulously, where the headwaters were.

“This is just recirculating,” Damone said, looking amused. “This is completely created.”

In 1996, before the preserve existed, Paul Simons, a local nature lover who liked to ride his bike on a path through the property, was struck by a car on Long Island and killed. In his honor, the Simons family created the Paul Simons Foundation, and bought the eight-acre property that would later become Avalon Park & Preserve. Griffiths was a friend of the Simons family and had just finished college in Ontario, studying political science and horticulture, and she moved to Stony Brook to lead the preserve. Creating the preserve was a way for the Simons family to grieve, she said, and it was meant to be a place that Paul would have wanted to be. Beyond that, she told me later, “We didn’t have a vision, really.”

So it turned to Andropogon, the Philadelphia-based landscape architecture firm, to create (more…)

Read Full Post »

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The focus is on Philadelphia in the new issue of LAM, with stories on four projects by OLIN Studio in their hometown as well as pieces on the city’s green infrastructure, new habitats at the zoo, special-use parks, and a hardworking new green space on the Penn campus by Andropogon. All this along with the regular features in Goods, Now, and Species, a fresh look at André Le Nôtre’s legacy, and a new book on the work of Hargreaves Associates. Read the full table of contents for January here or preview the digital issue of the January LAM here.

All in?  You can buy the current issue of the magazine at more than 200 bookstores including many university and independents as well as at Barnes and Noble. You can also purchase single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio. Want more? Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options. Check in with the LAM blog as we’ll be ungating some of the January issue as the month rolls out.

Image credits: Cover, © OLIN/Sahar Coston-Hardy; Rodin Museum, © OLIN/Sahar Coston-Hardy; Shoemaker Green, Andropogon Associates; Palette, Steven Gierke, ASLA/Courtesy Hoerr Schaudt; Museum of  Freeway Art, SWA Group; Sister Cities Park, Todd Mason at Halkin Architectural Photography.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: