Posts Tagged ‘SPECIES’

As part of an ongoing effort to make content more accessible, LAM will be making select stories available to readers in Spanish. For a full list of translated articles, please click here.

Click above for a full PDF of the translated text, with English text available below.

BY MAGGIE ZACKOWITZ

FROM THE DECEMBER 2018 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

 

Sam Droege’s lab at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center does not have a street address. To get there, you count the miles down a winding Maryland road, looking for the seventh in a series of gates (#6 is unnumbered) set into the tall wire fence alongside. Punch the code into a keypad for the gate once you find it, drive up the hill, and hang a sharp left. There sits a low building in a yard of waving grass and wildflowers, encircled by another high fence—this one electrified. It’s a remnant of security for the yard’s former occupants: whooping cranes once raised here to repopulate the species.

“The fencing wasn’t to keep the cranes in so much as keep the predators out,” explains Droege, a wildlife biologist. These days the compound’s objects of study aren’t luring the local carnivores. What’s inside, in fact, are stacks and stacks of pizza boxes. They are filled with bees.

First, the bees are drowned. Cup traps filled with soapy water are placed in sunny areas near blooming plants; the bees cooperate by falling in. Their bodies are then gently washed clean of pollen and dust, dried, assigned bar codes, labeled with date and place of collection, and pinned by the dozens to the floor of the protective pizza boxes to await identification. Bees are sent here by bee collectors from all over the world. “We’re up to over half a million specimens,” says Droege, who has run the United States Geological Survey’s Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab (NBIML) for some 20 years. (more…)

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Citizen scientists and experts work to catalogue and identify as many species as possible during the BioBlitz event.

Species experts and families work to identify and catalog as many species as possible during the BioBlitz event.

Since 2007, the National Park Service (NPS) and the National Geographic Society have teamed up to create BioBlitz, an annual event that celebrates the wealth of biodiversity in the United States. Each year, thousands of families sign up to search for and learn about different species of plants, animals, and fungi, among others, in various national parks across the country.

For the centenary year of the NPS, BioBlitz 2016 will be held at Constitution Gardens on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., where ASLA joins a variety of organizations at the Biodiversity Festival to speak on the importance of soil quality and health. “This is a great opportunity to reach out to potentially thousands of families and let them know what landscape architects do,” says Karen Grajales, the manager of public relations for ASLA, who will be joining Virginia Tech landscape architecture students and other ASLA staff members for the event.

To learn more about BioBlitz and potentially get involved, please click here.

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