Posts Tagged ‘Turkey’

BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER / PHOTOGRAPHY BY GABRIELLA MARKS

With her one-woman practice, Radicle, Christie Green works to repair our relationship with nature—including the animals and plants we eat.

FROM THE FEBRUARY 2019 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

 

The stars were still out when Christie Green, ASLA, parked her Tundra and turned off the engine. We were somewhere near Glorieta Mesa, Game Management Unit 45, about 30 minutes southeast of Santa Fe, New Mexico. In the moonlight, I could make out the bristle-brush tops of ponderosa and piñon pine. I grabbed the camouflage gear Green had lent me and got out of the truck. The April air was just a few degrees above freezing, and the only sounds were the howls of coyotes and the quiet murmurs of cattle somewhere in the valley. As the chill began to seep in, I tugged on my gloves and cowl. I had no idea how long we were going to be out there.

Green, who for the past five years has run a one-woman landscape design practice in Santa Fe called Radicle, had agreed to take me turkey hunting. Almost all of her projects, (more…)

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From the November 2013 issue of LAM:

By Constance Casey

A couple of million wild turkey hunters in full camouflage go out to the forests and meadows every year to try out various seductive techniques to lure the wary birds into range. Meanwhile, paradoxically, there are turkeys of the same species (Meleagris gallopavo) boldly approaching human beings. In fact some of the birds are chasing runners and bicyclists, digging up flower beds, consuming farmers’ seed corn, and strolling through parking lots and across backyards. More than a few homeowners, if it were legal, could plug a wild turkey from their back decks without donning camouflage or learning turkey calls. The birds seem to have learned where they can coexist with unthreatening human beings, and it’s getting on our nerves. These birds are big; an adult male can be 16 to 24 pounds with a wingspan of close to five feet, and they have sharp spurs on their legs. They can run up to 20 miles per hour on their velociraptor legs and fly at 55 miles per hour in bursts. They’re the largest North American ground-nesting bird, and the bolder ones are on the way to becoming as much of a nuisance to some as Canada geese.

In the wild the turkeys are easily spooked by unusual sights or sounds, so the hopeful shooters cover themselves in drab camouflage from head to toe, including a face mask with a narrow eye opening—hijab for hunters. Turkey hunting is one of the fastest-growing shooting sports; the National Wild Turkey Federation counts 2.6 million turkey hunters. Part of the appeal has to be that it’s a performance. The extremely skilled use their own voices to imitate turkey calls; others make the sounds with a wooden box that has a noisemaking handle or a slate that’s struck with a wooden stick. Whichever method, it’s not easy to re-create the gobble of a randy tom, the purr of a contented female, the cackle of a receptive hen, or the companionable clucks of flock talk.

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Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality

The plans for Taksim Square released last Fall by Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality

The bloody protests in Turkey aren’t just about urban design, but it was a plan to redesign Taksim Square that sparked the original demonstrations.  You may wonder what sort of plans could spark such a passionate response. Well, we’ve embedded animations from the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality’s website to show you.

In February 2012, the city released the animation below. The video begins with an aerial shot of Taksim Square as it is today, with many mature trees, and then shows the barren pedestrian zone that was initially set to replace it. The plans call for the reconstruction of a historic barracks that was to serve as a shopping mall and cultural destination, and almost all of the greenery was to be enclosed within this structure. These plans were by far the most widely circulated on the internet and are the only plans that show up on the municipality’s YouTube channel. (Update, June 6th: These plans have been removed from the municipality’s YouTube channel, but we have found another link to them.)

Apparently, the government got the message that those plans would not do for one of Istanbul’s most prominent open spaces. But instead of engaging with the public, the municipality released these slightly edited plans last October—on the same day it announced that construction would begin. The plans, which the municipality was showing off as recently as Saturday, break up some of the vast stretches of paving with panels of grass but the space they show is still quite inhumanely scaled with benches surrounded by fields of pavement and none of the shade the square previously provided.

There was also little effort to get out word to people living and working nearby about how the plans would affect them. In November 2012, the Hürriyet Daily News reported that some shopkeepers were surprised to discover their businesses had been permanently blocked off overnight when construction began on the underpasses. “Nobody informed us about this,” one shopkeeper said. “Yesterday morning they came and built this wall in front of my kiosk. It blocks my doorway, light and air.” By early May, more than half the project was actually constructed. The protests last week were a last-ditch effort to save the trees that still remained in a part of the area known as Gezi Park.

The Atlantic Cities has a reporter in Istanbul who interviewed Betül Tanbay, one of the activists who was protesting the park’s destruction. “We tried to have a dialogue with the municipality,” she said. “We didn’t say that nothing should be changed [at Taksim]. We said, let’s discuss it together. As citizens, we deserve to be part of the plans — we don’t want them to be made behind doors and declared during construction.”

Yesterday, the Hürriyet Daily News reported that  Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğanhad backed off plans for a shopping mall on the site, but still plans to  remove the existing park and build something there. “You cannot make an AVM [shopping mall] familiar to the international ones in this area,” Erdoğan said. “There is no conclusive AVM project here. Maybe we will make a city museum there or an architectural work that will put different activities in place. Is there any certain document? No.”

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