Category Archives: Climate

Bog Wild

Guarded by isolated landscapes and rough ocean waters, Argentina’s remote peatlands are among the world’s most effective and fragile carbon sinks.

By Jimena Martignoni / Photography by Joel Reyero

Peatlands appear in the landscape as extensive, soft surfaces slightly undulated and dotted by small pools of water.

At the southern tip of South America, between the Strait of Magellan to the north and west and Beagle Channel to the south, the Tierra del Fuego archipelago may hold one of the keys to global carbon sequestration: nearly pristine peatlands. Continue reading Bog Wild

Small Town, Heavy Load

Research with rural populations shows that small towns aren’t always better for health equity.

By Anjulie Rao

As part of an ongoing effort to make content more accessible, LAM will be making select stories available to readers in Spanish.

Backdropped by the COVID-19 pandemic, the shift of city dwellers to rural home buyers has been framed as a panacea to the health risks posed by dense urban environments. Continue reading Small Town, Heavy Load

Trees on Their Own Terms

New research into forests at the Arboreal Inquiries Symposium.

By Zach Mortice

Forests are many things to many people—repositories of carbon, factories for our atmosphere, near-sentient biological networks, and totems of climate change salvation, to name a few recent claims. But how can we understand forests separately from the way humans see them? Continue reading Trees on Their Own Terms

Roll, Tide

Gulf State Park in Alabama is one of the largest public projects to be funded through the Deepwater Horizon settlement. Many more are coming.

By Jared Brey

The Lodge at Gulf State Park was rebuilt as a sustainable tourism destination after a previous lodge, a popular vacation spot, was destroyed by Hurricane Ivan in 2004. Photo by Volkert, Inc., and Forrest Funk Drone Photography.

The Lodge at Gulf State Park is built directly into the dunes, so when you walk from the parking lot into the spacious lobby, you’re looking straight through the glass back wall of the hotel, across a stretch of white-sand beach, and out into the seemingly endless Gulf of Mexico. Continue reading Roll, Tide

One Big Picture

A cool map for a warming watershed arrives at the right moment.

By Lisa Owens Viani

As the western United States continues to wither in an extended drought, the Colorado River’s two largest reservoirs, Lake Mead and Lake Powell, have fallen to their lowest levels since they were first filled—Lake Mead in 1935 and Lake Powell in 1963—according to John Fleck, a professor of practice in water policy and governance in the Department of Economics and director of the Water Resources Program at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque. Continue reading One Big Picture

Landscape Architects Are Poised to Lead a New Era of Infrastructure

The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act includes more than a dozen ASLA policy recommendations.

By Roxanne Blackwell, Hon. ASLA

Portland Mall Revitalization, ASLA 2011 Professional General Design Award of Excellence, designed by ZGF Architects LLP. Image courtesy ZGF Architects LLP.

The House of Representatives just passed the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which makes significant investments in the nation’s transportation, water, renewable energy, and broadband infrastructure. The legislation incorporates 13 of the transportation, water, and natural resource policy recommendations sent by ASLA’s Government Affairs team to the leaders of congressional transportation and infrastructure committees and the Biden–Harris administration. Continue reading Landscape Architects Are Poised to Lead a New Era of Infrastructure