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At LAM, we’re counting down the days until the 2016 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO in New Orleans and, not least, our Meet the Editors sessions. Journalists from The Dirt, Landscape Architecture Frontiers, The Journal of Architectural Education, and Planetizen will be joining the LAM team for 15-minute sessions on Saturday and Sunday, October 22 and 23. Attendees can bring projects to be considered for publication or tell us about other new goings-on in their practices.

Spots are limited and fill quickly, so be sure to snag a session before they’re gone. Note: Meet the Editors is open to design professionals only. So if you’ve got a new product to share with the magazine, be sure to contact our Goods columnist, Kat Katsma, at kkatsma@asla.org.

Credit: ASLA 2016 Professional General Design Honor Award. Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park. Ramboll Studio Dreiseitl / Lim Shiang Han.

Credit: ASLA 2016 Professional General Design Honor Award. Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park. Ramboll Studio Dreiseitl / Lim Shiang Han.

 

Resilience is a word that has become fixed in the lexicon of landscape architecture, and for good reason. Resilience means, among other things, protecting the 80 percent of the world’s population living near a coast from the onslaught of natural disasters and climate change—and there are rising hazards inland, too. It also brings increasing equity to the valuable roles of landscape architects. There’s a ton of information out there on how communities can become more resilient. To help navigate it, ASLA recently released Resilient Design, a web guide that documents the importance of focusing on resilience (for the human and nonhuman worlds) and offers case studies organized into six general areas to show adaptations that try to anticipate the worst of circumstances. The guide, which was reviewed by several professionals deeply involved in resilience issues, emphasizes layered defenses rather than “heavy-handed infrastructure projects.”

DOUBLE DUTY

BY BETSY ANDERSON, ASSOCIATE ASLA

A stormwater retrofit makes space for a new park on Puget Sound.

A stormwater retrofit makes space for a new park on Puget Sound.

From the September 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

A ferry ride away from Seattle, Washington’s Kitsap Peninsula is a deeply lobed fjordscape whose 216 miles of shoreline have provided the perfect laboratory for development of so-called end-of-pipe stormwater solutions: space-saving treatment occurring at the bottom of the watershed, near aging municipal outfalls. These stormwater retrofits were most recently tested in Manchester, a close-knit village piled up at the peninsula’s eastern edge. Here, a former gas station site was recruited to treat 100 million gallons of polluted stormwater each year, before it enters Puget Sound.

Tucked between homes and businesses and adjacent to a busy swimming beach, the half-acre parcel now known as Manchester Stormwater Park inspired the project team—a cadre of Kitsap County staff plus engineers and landscape architects from Parametrix, N. L. Olson & Associates, and GeoEngineers—to take a multifunctional approach. “People really wanted a green space here,” says Jens Swenson, ASLA, a landscape architect for Parametrix who led the hardscape, lighting, and plant design for the park.

The green space was hard-won. Funded by a million-dollar grant from Continue Reading »

LAMCAST: MISSISSIPPI BASIN

Horace Mitchell, whose title is lead visualizer of NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio, has mapped sets of U.S. Geological Survey data on stream flows of the entire Mississippi River Basin, which, of course, includes the Missouri River and Ohio River watersheds. Mitchell traces the streams’ flows from source to mouth (though not at actual stream flow speeds). It takes a while for water to run from the continental divides to the Gulf of Mexico, but it eventually does get there.

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Credit: Rungkit Charoenwat.

Credit: Rungkit Charoenwat.

From the ASLA 2016 Professional General Design Honor Award winner “The Metro-Forest Project” by Landscape Architects of Bangkok in the September 2016 issue, featuring an urban reforestation project in Bangkok, Thailand.

“Floating above the canopy.”

—Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

You can read the full table of contents for September 2016 or pick up a free digital issue of the September LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

SETTLING IN

BY WENDY GILMARTIN

A Los Angeles firm turns to super-light interventions for a landscape bent on change.

A Los Angeles firm turns to super-light interventions for a landscape bent on change.

From the September 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

It’s been nearly three years since Los Angeles County Waste Management’s fleet of rumbling trash trucks ceased their daily climb up and down the massive landfill in Puente Hills, for years one of the nation’s largest. Now, the 640-acre site is poised to become a public park, and despite its proximity to an area rich in outdoor amenities like the picturesque Powder Canyon and Arroyo Pescadero Trail, it lacks easy access and infrastructure that would allow surrounding working-class San Gabriel Valley communities a chance to experience its spectacular views and raw terrain.

“When the county came to us, they wanted us to think big, and they wanted the public to think big,” says Bryan Matsumoto, a landscape design associate at Withers & Sandgren Landscape Architecture and Planning in Montrose, California. On behalf of the Los Angeles County Department of Parks and Recreation, Withers & Sandgren worked with Auburn, Alabama-based Hillworks Landscape + Architecture and other consultants to develop a careful strategy of maximizing the site’s abrasively Continue Reading »

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Credit: MIR for Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects.

Credit: MIR for Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects.

A rendering from the ASLA 2016 Analysis & Planning Professional Honor Award winner “Memorial Park Master Plan 2015” by Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects in the September 2016 issue, featuring the reworking and restoration of Memorial Park in Houston.

“Morning fog, photorealistic edition.”

—Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

You can read the full table of contents for September 2016 or pick up a free digital issue of the September LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.