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Archive for the ‘WATER’ Category

BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

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In Owens Lake, a land art installation draws on 100-year-old history while providing critical habitat.

FROM THE FEBRUARY 2017 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

When NUVIS Landscape Architecture was hired to assist the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) with its dust mitigation effort at Owens Lake (see “Dust to Bust,” LAM, October 2012), Perry Cardoza, ASLA, was given a list of objectives. Foremost, any design needed to tamp down the dust that had become a public health hazard, but it also would have to meet very specific habitat goals and help the department meet its water-use reduction targets. (LADWP has used up to 95,000 acre-feet of water annually for dust mitigation.) What was not on the list was any mention of land art.

“In everyone’s mind, this was going to be a hiking trail with a parking lot,” says Cardoza, an executive vice president at NUVIS. “We would have gravel and wetlands and some salt grass, and [we] would call it a day.” The project evolved, however, and the completed landscape, which opened to the public in April 2016 and won an Award of Excellence from the ASLA Southern California Chapter the same year, falls right into the land art tradition, even as it fulfills its mandate as an ecological booster.

Located on a tiny parcel—at 700 acres, the parcel is still just 1 percent of the lake’s total area—near the lake’s northeast boundary, the design includes a monument-like shade structure and a series of plazas and interpretive kiosks that are connected by four miles of walking paths. For Cardoza, what pushes the work into the realm of land art are its 14 (more…)

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM. 

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Image courtesy of NUVIS Landscape Architecture.

From “White Water on Dry Land,” by Timothy Schuler in the February 2017 issue, on a drained lake’s second life as an eerily austere but powerful sculpture garden.

“Waves on still water.”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

 

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BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

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Mapping the historic dunes hidden beneath the surface of Chicago.

FROM THE FEBRUARY 2017 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE.

A few years ago, Mary Pat McGuire, ASLA, became fascinated by the South Side of Chicago—or rather, with what was beneath it. She was flying back to the East Coast often, leaving from Midway Airport, and she started to notice “really interesting patterns along the coastline that looked like stripes, ridges along the shore. They were some kind of remnant,” she says, describing the landscape south of the city. “I just started to wonder, ‘What’s really going on here? What was this place?’”

McGuire, an assistant professor of landscape architecture at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, was already familiar with the South Side’s more recent history of white flight, shuttered industry, and disinvestment. Now, she became interested in the area’s geologic history, and how it might be put to work. The landforms she spied from the air prompted McGuire to look at early soil maps made by the U.S. Geological Survey. What she found were (more…)

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Many eyes are hungrily on the Arctic. The polar region is opening to resource hunters and shippers who see huge advantages in the unfortunate loss of its ice. Heavier development will inevitably find its way north, with enormous impact to ecology and indigenous societies. This month, Jessica Bridger, a LAM contributing editor, reports on the research by Leena Cho and Matthew Jull and their Arctic Design Group. Cho is an assistant professor of landscape architecture and Jull is an assistant professor of architecture at the University of Virginia. They have taken landscape and architecture students to Svalbard, about as north as the settled north gets, to study urbanization patterns and develop design responses to the environmental challenges of industry amid the receding ice and shifting permafrost—signs of much more to come.

In Catalonia, Tim Waterman views the city of Girona as the landscape architect Martí Franch has connected it—humanely, narratively—through removal of vegetation that opens up views and creates connections. It’s as much an act of radical maintenance as it is design. And in El Paso, Mark Hough, FASLA, considers the University of Texas campus newly designed by Ten Eyck Landscape Architects of Austin. It regenerates the desert site (with its Bhutanese architecture) with the vigor you would expect from Christine Ten Eyck, FASLA. In the Back section, Anne Whiston Spirn, FASLA, writes on the work of the artists Helen and Newton Harrison and its suggestive flow into landscape architecture. And in Books, Julia Czerniak reviews The Course of Landscape Architecture by Christophe Girot.

In Now, read about postcoal scenarios for Utah and new moves in Scandinavian urbanism. The Office section asks firms about their collaboration software setups. In Water, Sasaki has helped Cedar Rapids, Iowa, get ready for its next big flood. In Tech, we have the intriguing potential of 3-D scanning for landscapes. And in Goods this month, we have fences—but only nice, almost come-hither fences. The full table of contents for January can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating January articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Permafrost Urbanists,” Jessica Bridger; “It’s About Time,” Estudi Martí Franch; “Desert Bloom,” Adam Barbe, ASLA; “Second Chances,” Sasaki; “Infinite Mapping,” Tommy Jordan; “Sharing Is Wearing,” Norris Design; “The Art of Inquiry, Manifestation, and Enactment,” Piet Janmaat

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BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

Where has all the sediment gone? Image courtesy of Landscape Metrics and the Dredge Research Collaborative.

Where has all the sediment gone? Image courtesy of Landscape Metrics and the Dredge Research Collaborative.

From the December 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

Thanks to a severe shortage of sediment, the tidal marshes of the San Francisco Bay are disappearing, taking with them a vital ecosystem and an important defense against sea-level rise. In response, in June 2016, voters approved a parcel tax that will generate $500 million over the next 20 years for wetland restoration. And yet the sediment hasn’t vanished; it’s a prisoner of the state’s highly altered hydrologic system. “There’s this incredible resource that’s just sitting behind this constellation of dams,” says Landscape Metrics principal Matthew Seibert.

This summer, as a part of DredgeFest California, Seibert worked with the Dredge Research Collaborative and workshop participants to visualize this “hidden sediment reserve.” Based on data published in the journal Water Resources Research in 2009, the team created an interactive map showing where—and when—California’s sediment was diverted, as well as the cost of removing that sediment, which far exceeds the expected $500 million in tax revenue. Seibert is optimistic, however, especially as the economics of climate change become increasingly apparent: “The Baylands have an amazing capacity for flood mitigation that I don’t feel is quantified economically yet, or valued as it should be.”

For an interactive version of this map, visit landscapemetrics.com/dredge.

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

The Farm at Miller's Crossing, Hudson, NY

Photo by Frederick Charles/fcharles.com.

From “A Foodshed Moment” by Anne Raver in the December 2016 issue, the story of the Hudson Valley’s struggle to balance real estate hunger for farmland estates with the need for cropable acres to feed New York City (pictured are Katie and Chris Cashen on their farm).

“Farming is in the family…”

–CHRIS MCGEE, LAM ART DIRECTOR

You can read the full table of contents for December 2016 or pick up a free digital issue of the December LAM here and share it with your clients, colleagues, and friends. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 700 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options. 

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BY ANNE RAVER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY FREDERICK CHARLES

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Preserving farmland is not enough if it doesn’t stay in the hands of farmers.

FROM THE DECEMBER 2016 ISSUE OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE

A gorgeous October morning in the Hudson Valley and people are out leaf peeping, but not Chris Cashen, a farmer.

Every week, on the outskirts of Hudson, 120 miles north of New York City, Cashen and his crew load about 1,300 pounds of organic vegetables—baby bok choy, salad greens, Japanese turnips, sweet potatoes, Tuscan kale—onto a truck headed for a food pantry hub in Long Island City.

The hot, dry summer meant they had to irrigate from the nearby creek, but the vegetables are beautiful and tasty.

A few miles south, Ken Migliorelli zigzags over the potholed roads between his hilly orchard in Tivoli and the flat sandy fields of his cropland in Red Hook. A Valentine’s Day freeze took out all his stone fruit this year—no peaches, nectarines, or cherries—and a hard frost in May reduced his apple crop by 30 percent. (more…)

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