Category Archives: Parks

How to Grow a Greenway

For New Orleans’s popular Lafitte Greenway, the plan was just the beginning.

By Jane Margolies

Man planting trees near "Greenway GROW!" sign
Volunteers help plant cypress trees on the Lafitte Greenway in April during an event that sprang from the park’s new Greenway GROW! management strategy. Photo courtesy Spackman Mossop Michaels.

On a recent morning in New Orleans, church parishioners, employees on loan from local businesses, and sailors in town for Navy Week were among the 130 volunteers who showed up to plant 100 cypress trees in a bioswale on the Lafitte Greenway. The city’s Department of Parks and Parkways had already cleared the site bordering the Tremé neighborhood, and staff from the New Orleans office of the landscape architecture firm Spackman Mossop Michaels (SMM) and a tree-planting nonprofit group had marked off where the 15-gallon, one-inch-caliper pond and bald cypress were to go. So the volunteers dug holes, dropped in the trees, backfilled them with soil, staked, and mulched. With everyone pitching in, the job was done in three hours. Continue reading How to Grow a Greenway

Park Diplomacy Across the U.S.–Mexico Border

This article is also available in Spanish

At Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, “two countries, two cities, one culture, one river, one park.”

By Jane Margolies

Zacate Creek, which feeds into the Rio Grande, creates an arroyo with a natural waterfall. Photo by Overland Partners.

Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo in Tamaulipas, Mexico—known colloquially as Los Dos Laredos—were a single city divided by the Rio Grande River until 1848, when a treaty established the international border in the river, leaving one half in the United States and the other in Mexico. Continue reading Park Diplomacy Across the U.S.–Mexico Border

Art Director’s Cut: Rain and Shine

The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

“The devil in the details.”

—Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

Image by Halff Associates, Inc.

From “Rain and Shine” by Elizabeth Lunday in the March 2022 issue, about Halff Associates, Inc.’s Railyard Park in Waxahachie, Texas, which tucks in stormwater management infrastructure and a few material flourishes that speak to the town’s history, detailed here, into a park on the edge of downtown.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 250 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

March LAM: Terminal Ends, New Beginnings

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Foreground

Small Town, Heavy Load (Research)
Urbanites flee to rural areas for the fresh air and open space, but a study of three Iowa towns finds those advantages aren’t enjoyed equally. Small-scale interventions are one way
landscape designers can help.

Features

Unbuilt to Last
Plans to redevelop an Oakland, California, waterfront hit a snag when no one could agree what to do with a massive historic shipping terminal. Instead of scrapping the plan, Einwiller Kuehl
jumped it to the next level, deconstructing the historic fabric and adding just
enough finesse to keep things lively on deck.

Core Four
When Dallas lost out on landing a big corporation because it lacked downtown parks, Robert Decherd took it personally. Over the next 20 years, his foundation-backed Parks for Downtown Dallas transformed the city’s urban core, funding a master plan and four high-profile urban parks, but some are asking if that is happening at the expense of the city’s neighborhood parks.

The full table of contents for March can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 250 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be posting March articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Unbuilt to Last,” Eric Einwiller; “Core Four,” David Woo, Courtesy Parks for Downtown Dallas; “Small Town, Heavy Load,” George R. Barker Drone Photography.

Inter-Active

A deck park proposal for the city of Peoria picks up speed.

By Jennifer Reut

A concept for InterPlay Park called “The Window” would allow visitors to observe the highway traffic below. Image by Terrain Work.

Seattle’s Freeway Park, Boston’s Rose Kennedy Greenway, and Dallas’s Klyde Warren Park. Although all three highway deck parks are known outside their home cities for their audacious design and engineering, it’s the third, by OJB, that arguably has set off a wave of similar projects in the past several years. Continue reading Inter-Active

Roll, Tide

Gulf State Park in Alabama is one of the largest public projects to be funded through the Deepwater Horizon settlement. Many more are coming.

By Jared Brey

The Lodge at Gulf State Park was rebuilt as a sustainable tourism destination after a previous lodge, a popular vacation spot, was destroyed by Hurricane Ivan in 2004. Photo by Volkert, Inc., and Forrest Funk Drone Photography.

The Lodge at Gulf State Park is built directly into the dunes, so when you walk from the parking lot into the spacious lobby, you’re looking straight through the glass back wall of the hotel, across a stretch of white-sand beach, and out into the seemingly endless Gulf of Mexico. Continue reading Roll, Tide