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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Brian Luenser Photography.

Credit: Brian Luenser Photography.

From “Square Dance” by Jonathan Lerner in the February 2016 issue, featuring Sundance Square Plaza in Fort Worth, Texas, designed by Michael Vergason Landscape Architects.

“There’s something very Lewis Carroll about the reflections.”

—Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

PLANTING CIVIL RIGHTS

BY SONJA DÜMPELMANN

Street tree plant-ins in New York City.

Street tree plant-ins in New York City.

From the December 2015 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

In the 1973 children’s story What Are We Going to Do, Michael? 10-year-old Michael, together with his neighbor Mrs. Jacobson, helps to save an 80-year-old southern magnolia tree that is threatened with being cut down to make way for an urban renewal project in their neighborhood. Nellie Burchardt’s story is based upon true facts and events that occurred in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Yet, the way in which Burchardt portrays Michael and Mrs. Jacobson belies parts of the true story. In the children’s book, the two protagonists appear as white residents of a run-down, racially diverse neighborhood. In reality, Mrs. Jacobson was Hattie Carthan, an African American woman in her 70s living on a deteriorating neighborhood block in Bedford-Stuyvesant. By 1970, Bedford-Stuyvesant had become one of the largest African American communities in the United States, and, as Harold X. Connolly wrote in 1977, “a code word…for America’s unresolved urban and race problems.” It is unclear whether Burchardt’s choice to change the race of her protagonists had anything to do with the sales or readership aspirations for the book, or with the more idealist educational and egalitarian aspirations to cultivate white children’s empathy and awareness of nature in the city and of its ethnically and racially diverse citizenry, or, in turn, even with an unabashed racism. In any case the choice of the story itself as well as the changes made to its principal characters reflect the social concerns and anxieties of the time.

But changing the race of the principal characters—while perhaps making the story more accessible to the anticipated majority of readers—also covered up one of the most important facts about it: Continue Reading »

LAM_Oct15_Cover

Whether you’re a professional working on a downtown plaza or a student hoping to shape the future landscape, it’s time to show off your finest work. ASLA is now accepting submissions for its 2016 Professional and Student Awards. Professionals have until March 18 to submit their work, and students have until May 13 (yes, that’s after semester’s end, we hope).

As ever, the competition will be tough, but the opportunity for recognition is well worth the time and effort in submitting. “It’s an honor to be selected by your peers from among hundreds of submissions as one of the best in landscape architecture from around the globe,” says Carolyn Mitchell, ASLA’s Honors & Awards Coordinator.

Once selected, winners will be featured in the annual awards issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine and at the 2016 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO, held this year in New Orleans, October 21-24, 2016.

For more information, please click here.

 

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In February’s issue of LAM, you’ll find Sweetwater Spectrum, the winner of a 2015 ASLA Honor Award in Residential Design by Roche + Roche Landscape Architecture, designed for a community of adults with autism; Sundance Square Plaza in Fort Worth, Texas, designed by Michael Vergason Landscape Architects to transform a dead block in a resurgent downtown; and a report on what’s behind the numbers of the National Park Service’s  $11.49 billion maintenance backlog. And you won’t want to miss a fabulous project in Massachusetts, where a historic airport has reverted to a naturalistic wetland and meadow, designed by Crosby | Schlessinger | Smallridge.

In Water, a 1,000-year flood in Nashville brought about a park that works with rather than against water; and in House Call, a garden pavilion built from a steep cliff over the San Fernando Valley creates outdoor space with breathtaking views. And don’t miss our regular Now, Species, Goods, and Books columns. The full table of contents for February can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating February articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Welcome Home,” Marion Brenner, Affiliate ASLA; “Square Dance,” Brian Luenser Photography; “Roads to Ruin,” Philip Walsh; “Soft Landing,” © Charles Mayer Photography; “Nashville’s New Porch,” Matt Carbone; “Over the Edge,” © Undine Pröhl.

LAMJan16NPS1

From January’s issue: LAM goes to the extremes in celebration of the National Park Service’s centennial.

From the January 2016 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

On August 26, Americans will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. Members and friends of ASLA can feel especially proud, as the society, along with the American Civic Association, was instrumental in the passage of the National Park Service Organic Act, which established the agency, in 1916. Today there are 59 national parks, sublime wedges of paradise where time seems to stand still. To begin the centenary year at LAM, we’ve gone to extremes to find parks with superlative qualities as a reminder of the awe the parks inspire. Continue Reading »

 

Produced and directed by Austin Allen, an associate professor at Louisiana State University, Claiming Open Spaces is a documentary on the perception of parks, in cities such as New Orleans and Detroit, from the cultural perspective of the African Americans who use them. As noted by a young Walter Hood, ASLA, the cultural makeup of the communities that use city parks is often left out of planning and programming, which can alienate the people meant to use them. This lapse comes up in interviews with residents who fondly remember a neighborhood park before it was redesigned and with kids who wonder why they are constantly hounded by police for simply enjoying time in the park.

BEDIT_Session_2016_IMG_1506

One of the many peer-led sessions from the 2015 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO held in Chicago.

Until January 28, ASLA is accepting session proposals for the 2016 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO, which will be held this year in New Orleans (yes, it is exciting) October 21–24.

The possibilities are broad. New topics, such as research into the mechanics behind a design, are always welcome to help push the knowledge discussion forward. But there is always an eager audience for familiar topics, says Emily O’Connor, the Education Programs Administrator at ASLA. “Residential design and sustainable development have been popular sessions in past meetings,” O’Connor says. But time is running out. Refine your topic, round up any other panelists you might invite, and get your proposal in!

For more information, please visit here.

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