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Archive for the ‘CITIES’ Category

 

Produced and directed by Austin Allen, an associate professor at Louisiana State University, Claiming Open Spaces is a documentary on the perception of parks, in cities such as New Orleans and Detroit, from the cultural perspective of the African Americans who use them. As noted by a young Walter Hood, ASLA, the cultural makeup of the communities that use city parks is often left out of planning and programming, which can alienate the people meant to use them. This lapse comes up in interviews with residents who fondly remember a neighborhood park before it was redesigned and with kids who wonder why they are constantly hounded by police for simply enjoying time in the park.

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BY ADAM REGN ARVIDSON, FASLA

Diane Jones Allen works to put public spaces and neighborhoods back together in post-Katrina New Orleans.

Diane Jones Allen works to put public spaces and neighborhoods back together in post-Katrina New Orleans.

From the November 2015 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

In the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans, at a community garden baking in the March sun, some herbs struggle up out of cinder block planters, and irrigation lines snake through the beds, which are awaiting springtime seeds. On the side of a toolshed is a big chalkboard announcing an evening movie screening and other community events. In the shade of a wooden arbor, Diane Jones Allen, ASLA, is meeting with Jenga Mwendo, the director of the Backyard Gardeners Network, which runs the garden. They are discussing not this place, the Guerrilla Garden, but the vacant city block across the street. Mwendo wants to claim it as community space, and Jones Allen is helping her envision what that might look like.

Jones Allen starts up her laptop on the wooden picnic table and presents a few sketches: plastic crates repurposed as small gardens, movable tables on a gravel bed, a pile of tires as a play area. That last idea intrigues Mwendo. “I just came across a pile of tires,” she says. “I’m just trying to remember where I saw that. There are lots of tires in this neighborhood.” She says she could probably make that happen right away, and it would offer some more options for Kids’ Club, an after-school program at the Guerrilla Garden. As Jones Allen presents her ideas, (more…)

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The things our art director, Chris McGee, hated to leave out of the current issue of LAM.

Slide Crater at Maggie Daley Park features multiple slide options for children 5 to 12 years old. Credit: Alex MacLean.

Slide Crater at Maggie Daley Park features multiple slide options for children 5 to 12 years old. Credit: Alex MacLean.

From “We Got Fun. And Foam.” by Timothy A. Schuler, in the November 2015 issue, featuring Maggie Daley Park, Chicago’s newest addition to lakeside Grant Park.

“Maggie Daley Park is like a fantasyland of colors and shapes. It’s like staring into an aquarium!”

—Chris McGee, LAM Art Director

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

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BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER

As drinking fountains fade from view, a call to make them iconic again.

As drinking fountains fade from view, a call to make them iconic again.

From the November 2015 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

There are no reliable statistics on the number of drinking fountains in the United States, but according to the Washington Post, over the years a number of researchers have been documenting their disappearance. This year, the International Plumbing Code reduced its per-building fountain requirement by half.

Studies show that in the absence of drinking fountains, Americans often turn to bottled water, the negative environmental effects of which have been well documented. But equally worrisome is the impact a lack of drinking fountains could have on (more…)

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Design disciplines often bounce around words hinting at the experimentation with practices beyond their expertise: multidisciplinary, collaborative. And it is this idea of expansion beyond one’s discipline that Outside Design wants to explore. From now until December 19, the exhibit will be on display at the Sullivan Galleries at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago as a collateral event to the first Chicago Architecture Biennial. Landscape architecture, architecture, art, materials, agriculture, biology, and more collide in “laboratories” installed on site that change throughout the period of their installment. Using frogs to measure oxygen levels in buildings, reclaimed materials for human and animal cohabitation, and a compact self-sustaining system, these installments experiment with creating fluid movement between neighboring professions.

If you are attending the 2015 ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO, be sure to stop by during the Sullivan Galleries open hours, Tuesday–Saturday, 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. For more information and a list of upcoming exhibit events, please visit here.

Credit: Images courtesy the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Sullivan Galleries; “Honey Windows,” “Habitat Wall,” “Amphibious Envelope,” “Biodynamic Feedback Loop,” Tony Favarula; “Black Gold Magic,” Christine Kousgaard.

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This year’s ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO in Chicago is loaded with the best of landscape architecture, and November’s hefty issue of LAM is jam-packed to match. The work of Diane Jones Allen works to reconnect broken public space in New Orleans; the Public Media Commons by DLANDstudio Architecture + Landscape Architecture in St. Louis makes space for free speech; the new Maggie Daley Park in Chicago, by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, has nearly as much going on under the surface as above; the landscape is loaded with history in the new Palmisano Park in Chicago by Site Design Group; and bison make a comeback in a prairie under restoration in Illinois.

In Interview, the journalist Peter Annin talks about his book The Great Lakes Water Wars, and the complications of a water body with multiple owners; and in House Call, Coen + Partners creates fluid boundaries between public and private in a Chicago house. And don’t miss our regular Now, Species, Goods, and Books columns. The full table of contents for November can be found here.

As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university stores and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also buy single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio or order single copies of the print issue from ASLA. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options.

Keep an eye out here on the blog, on the LAM Facebook page, and on our Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating November articles as the month rolls out.

Credits: “Where the Water Will Be,” © Peter Ringenberg; “Outside Looking In,” Christopher Barrett Photographer; “The Connector,” David Grunfeld; “Street Theater,” Jason Winkeler Photography, Courtesy Nine Network of Public Media; “We Got Fun. And Foam,” Alex MacLean; “Deep Cut,” Robert Sit, Site Design Group, Ltd.; “The Bison Begin Again,” Noppadol Paothong.

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BY GARY HILDERBRAND, FASLA

Dan Kiley's South Garden at the Art Institute of Chicago has seasoned over nearly 50 years into a rugged, magical hawthorn canopy.

Dan Kiley’s South Garden at the Art Institute of Chicago has seasoned over nearly 50 years into a rugged, magical hawthorn canopy.

From the October 2015 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

There is nothing quite like sitting beneath the almost fully connective canopy of 50-year-old cockspur hawthorns in Dan Kiley’s South Garden at the Art Institute of Chicago in early summer. The 32 trees at the center of the garden, set in a 20-foot grid, reached their natural maximum height long ago. Their wily trunks have thickened and twisted with age; their craggy, wandering branches continued to elongate, eventually overlapping and intertwining, creating a space that has a level of repose perhaps unequaled in a midcentury urban landscape space. Crataegus crus-galli has narrow, waxy, obovate leaves, which are naturally held upright at the tops of the branches, suggesting intolerance for shade; they filter a kaleidoscope of sunlight and shadow onto the warm brown crushed-stone paving below. Reflections from the water surface and gravel color the air. Though generally I find the modernist conceit of describing “rooms” in landscapes inadequate or ill-suited, this canopy explicitly creates a ceiling and produces a dazzling sense of interiority within the garden’s sunken court space. It’s hard to believe you are sitting within 150 feet of Chicago’s main drag.

Michigan Avenue, the historic eastern anchor of Chicago’s exalted grid, attracts hordes of traffic and tourists to its institutions, architectural sites, and parks. There are excellent urban landscapes to see here, including the Lurie Garden, Maggie Daley Park, Grant Park, and the grounds of the Field Museum. None is more tranquil than the South Garden. Peter Schaudt, one of Chicago’s most admired landscape architects, considered it Chicago’s best landscape space. This year, ASLA conferred its Landmark Award to the project, which recognizes works between 15 and 50 years old that retain their design integrity and benefit to the public realm. At about its 50-year mark, the South Garden more than (more…)

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