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BY JANE MARGOLIES

An iconic Robert Moses-designed park on Long Island gets a resilient rethinking.

From the November 2016 Issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine 

 

I’m standing on the boardwalk at Jones Beach State Park in Wantagh, New York, with Faye Harwell, FASLA, a codirector of Rhodeside & Harwell. Our backs to the Atlantic, we look out over a flat expanse that used to be covered by shuffleboard, ping-pong, and tennis courts. Now it’s a mountain of broken-up concrete. By next summer, this will be a rolling naturalistic setting, dotted with a rock-climbing wall, zip line, splash pool, and, yes, a couple of shuffleboard courts, too. It will be the most visible of the many changes taking place at Jones Beach in a $65 million project undertaken by the state’s Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation and guided by a report from Harwell’s firm.

Changes are needed. Built by the urban planning czar Robert Moses in 1929 as part of an unprecedented network of parkways and public parks, Jones Beach once was a six-and-a-half-mile-long marvel along the south shore of Long Island. Moses had used dredged sand to connect several small barrier islands, on which he and the landscape architect Clarence Coombs laid out the park (more…)

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By Zach Mortice

The 2008 flooding in eastern Iowa saw the Cedar River crest at 31 feet, inundating much of downtown Cedar Rapids. Image courtesy of Sasaki.

On the morning of Jun 12, 2008, the landscape architects Gina Ford, ASLA, and Jason Hellendrung, ASLA, of Sasaki woke up in their hotel rooms by the riverside in downtown Cedar Rapids, Iowa, to stifling heat and eerie silence. They were in town to pitch their riverfront master plan to the city council. They knew the Cedar River was expected to flood (and had stocked up on water, granola bars, and bananas just in case) but neither expected any sort of ordeal stemming from the river, which they had come hoping to reimagine as a lively and gregarious urban greenway. The power, air-conditioning, and phones were out. The hallways were empty and pitch black, and a ferocious rainstorm had darkened the skies and pushed the encroaching floodwaters. Reaching each other via cell phone, they discussed their options. In the distance, the Quaker Oats cereal mill plant’s red neon sign was still lit. “It can’t be that bad,” said Hellendrung. “They still have electricity.”

“As I said that, there was a bolt of thunder and lightning, and the sign went out. Then I was like, ‘Maybe the police will get here soon?’”

Police did dispatch rescuers, who led Ford and Hellendrung out of the hotel. A second-floor connection to the convention center (more…)

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A monthly roundup of the news, dispatches, and marginalia that caught our eye.

In this month’s issue of the Queue, the staff reads up on the grand opening of Dilworth Plaza in Philadelphia by OLIN, wonders at the possibilities of a man-made leaf, and gets down with Greenpeace and Reggie Watts on climate change.

CATCHING UP WITH…

    • Dilworth Plaza’s makeover by OLIN (“Follow the Lines,” LAM, January 2014) opens on September 4 in Philadelphia with new transit access, a fountain (and in winter, an ice rink), art, and Cuban food in what had been a desolate sunken plaza.
    • Harsh contentions arise in a current forensic audit on Great Park, designed by Ken Smith in Irvine, California (General Design Honor Award, LAM, August 2009). According to the L.A. Times, the audit finds that more than $200 million has been spent on the project, yet the park has little to show for it.

FIELD STUDIES

    • Dezeen reports on Julian Melchiorri, a graduate of the Royal College of Art in the UK, who thinks he’s got long-distance space travel figured out with his new invention—the world’s supposedly first photosynthetic material that absorbs water and carbon dioxide to create oxygen.
    • Looking at climate change and rising sea levels, the township of Choiseul Bay, 6.6 feet above sea level in the Solomon Islands, is moving to where it will be a little less wet in the future.
    • Think pedestrian crosswalk time limits are too short? Planners in Singapore thought so, too, which is why they recently expanded their Green Man Plus program, a system that allows the elderly and disabled to activate extra time for street crossing with the use of a special card.

OUT AND ABOUT

    • Lines and Nodes, a symposium and film festival that will take on media, infrastructure, and aesthetics, will take place September 19–21 in New York.

DISTRACT ME FROM MY DEADLINE DEPT.

    • If you can’t find this bus stop in Baltimore, then you’re not looking hard enough.

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In the May issue, we  focus for the first time on lighting and landscape with the work of dynamic lighting designers in collaboration with landscape architects. We look at projects by M. Paul Friedberg with MCLA, Ken Smith and SHoP with Tillotson Design Associates, PWP and Michael Arad with Fisher Marantz Stone, WRT and L’Observatoire International, and OLIN with Tillett Lighting Design. There’s also a how-to on Morpholio Trace 2.0 in Workstation, and new research on sin-free lawn grasses. Marcel Wilson talks about his young practice, Bionic. And a graphic designer takes us through the vanishing world of urban typescapes. All this plus our regular features in Species, Books, and Goods. This month’s ASLA CES is on Soils for Landscape Architecture Projects.

You can read the full table of contents for May here. As always, you can buy this issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine at more than 200 bookstores, including many university and independents, as well as at Barnes & Noble. You can also purchase single digital issues for only $5.25 at Zinio that can be read on your desktop or mobile device. Annual subscriptions for LAM are a thrifty $59 for print and $44.25 for digital. Our subscription page has more information on subscription options. Keep an eye on the LAM blog, Facebook page, and Twitter feed (@landarchmag), as we’ll be ungating some May pieces as the month rolls out.

 
Credits: 9-11: Courtesy Fisher Marantz Stone; SteelStacks: Emile Dubuisson for l’Observatoire International; East River: John Muggenborg/www.johnmuggenborg.com; Syracuse: Steven Satori, Syracuse University; Yards Park: David Galen; Dam: MKSK; Morpholio Trace: Lohren Deeg, ASLA; Turf: Suzanne O’Connell; Owls: Courtesy travelwayoflife/wikimedia commons; 50K Trees: Sarah Moos, Associate ASLA.

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BY KEVAN WILLIAMS

Fore-Now_DISTURBANCE-blog

From the April 2014 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine.

The words that scientists and policy makers choose often say as much as the content of their papers and speeches. For instance, a great deal has been written about whether events such as Hurricane Katrina, Superstorm Sandy, and even recent snow days in the Southeast are truly “natural” disasters, or if the framing of these so-called acts of God masks the human responsibilities for their occurrence. Even the seemingly benign word “disturbance,” an ecological term encompassing events such as floods and fires, takes for granted certain ideas about how ecosystems work.

(more…)

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The international competition best private plots – Die besten Gärten 2012, which recognizes achievements in the sustainable design of  private outdoor spaces and gardens, is seeking entries. The submission deadline is June 4, 2012, and entry forms and more details are available here.

The outdoor spaces, either newly designed or a redesign, must have been created no more than 10 years ago, and they must be clearly identifiable as residential and for private use.

Nominated projects will be announced July 10, and winners will be recognized September 29, 2012, at an awards ceremony at the Essl Museum near Vienna, Austria.

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